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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 35 total)
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  • in reply to: Light Rail in Central Ohio #1093927

    tk3000
    Participant

    St. Louis, MO, has an amazing, large, and dense light rail system that goes underground through tunnels, overground (what a view!), and ground level; and St Louis has 1/3 of the population of Columbus (so likely, much less traffic issues).Even Detroit –which still is very much bankrupt and shrank population — in the last few years came up with the idea of built a brand new light rail system that has been touted as the next big thing in order to attract a new wave of young newcomers to the city; and amazingly enough they not only came with the idea, but they in fact built it in a couple of years and it is operation right now. Moreover in Charlotte, NC, “On February 22, 2006, the Charlotte Area Transit System announced that its rapid rail lines will be called the “Lynx.” and “On November 24, 2007, first light rail line opened, called the LYNX Blue Line. It runs 9.6 miles (15.5 km) between Uptown Charlotte and stops short of Pineville, using a railroad right-of-way paralleling South Boulevard in its entirety.”

    It seems that Columbus is indeed the city of ineptitude and anachronism. One has to consider moving out: Charlotte has a very nice weather.

    in reply to: Garden Moss #1088515

    tk3000
    Participant

    Thanks for the info. I like moss due to its texture and fluff feeling. I am not in a big hurry to replace the whole grass area with moss, it should take place in stages; but many years is too long a time. I was wondering if there was a moss created by a process of combination+selection or even GMO that would grow faster even in sunny conditions.

    in reply to: Light Rail in Central Ohio #1056787

    tk3000
    Participant

    Historically speaking, I believe many of the things we cherish today as essential were criticized as unnecessary before built, including: Ohio Stadium (incredible)! Nationwide Arena, the outerbelt, and even the statehouse dome. Rail transportation isn’t something that’s happening only in NY. And LA. We should be more forward thinking about our future. And, eight years isn’t too long a time table. The metro in DC opened in 1976. But was planned way back in 1966.

    It is very true indeed. Consider the Interstate Highway system built throughout the whole country and nowdays it constitutes the artery of our transportation network whereby and without which the flow of goods, services, and people would be severely impaired and the economy would largely come to a standstill. It was initially an act of dilletantism and cold war era paranoia.

    On occasion of being stationed in Germany — during the post-war era – Eisenhower was very much impressed by their Autobahn and then was utterly motivated to build something similar in America. And to make it more acceptable one of the mainstays in the justification of such monumental project and its build-up was as necessary means to evacuate the major US urban centers in case of a nuclear exchange with the Soviet Union.

    The argument often purported and used to delegitimize and detract from the construction of a fast rail system in the US that there is no demand for a fast rail network in the US is rather ridiculous and ludicrous. I am rather impressed that there is any demand for Amtrak considering how poor and precarious the service is. Since there are a substantial ridership for such a substandard and subpar service currently provided by Amtrak then one should conclude that Fast Rail would be a monumental success.

    in reply to: Old North Arcade #1049198

    tk3000
    Participant

    The renascence of the old arcade geared up towards nostalgia and bar entertainment is fairly interesting. I am into vintage computer, console, and arcade games. Also have developed games in the far away past. I heard that Columbus have an arcade museum, but it seems to open to the public once in a while; any impressions about the arcade museum? Are there any computer museum in Columbus as well (maybe located in a college campus)?

    in reply to: Columbus-Chicago Passenger Rail #1048590

    tk3000
    Participant

    It is amazing how one would distort and display statiscs to suit their message. The average has very little meaning in this context, nonetheless the distribution of wealth and the index of human development purports real meaning. The mainstay herein is that there are too many super rich people in America, so the average is high; but the poor in America often have to work two jobs just to be able to pay their bills and still leave in poverty. Funnily enough the super rich pay very little in taxes given that their income is mostly derived from capital gains.

    On the other hand, countries like Germany have Maglev (that literally gravitates on a magnetic field) High Speed Trains and rich speeds of 300 mph. The Fast Rail system is all other the place in Germany. And as far as the use of automobile goes, did you know that “In 2010, Germany produced more than 5.5 million automobiles; the U.S produced 2.7 million. At the same time, the average auto worker in Germany made $67.14 per hour in salary in benefits”

    in reply to: Columbus-Chicago Passenger Rail #1047887

    tk3000
    Participant

    It is not only about distorted and disconnected metrics that often detractors of fast rail systems come up with, it is more often than not about their bizarre rationales. The large benefits of a fast rail system suitable for a modern and dynamics society are the intangible ones: freedom of choice and degree of freedom of the populous, and alongside these freedoms come amazing benefits to society and civilization as a whole (should one spend 20 hours per week driving with tension and stress while staring at the grass, or should one spend that time in a comfortable train cabin writing the next big best seller, or maybe help to write an amazing piece of code that will leverage the well-being of humanity). Low and behold, time is the most valuable asset that one have.

    As far as cheap air travel goes, it seems that across the board the prices are extremely expensive statistically speaking compared to just about any other country. Personally I could never find any airfare even with 3 months antecipation or more in my regional travel that would a price anywhere close to being acceptable. Moreover, the vast majority of people often have to drive 50 miles to the next airport whereon the airfares is still very high but not as exorbitant as the airport nearby for a trip of 200 miles (one sometimes would prefer to drive the 200 miles by car, instead of flying at all)

    Often, detractors highlight the cost of maintenance of a new rail system… How about the cost of the maintenance of roads and thousands vehicles – each one weighting few tons –- that would then stay inside a garage instead of creating more wear and tear on the roads. How about the cost of maintenance for individual and families with their automobiles which then would drop substantially (often mechanics charge over $100 per hour, or more depending on the complexity of the job), on top of that there is also wear and tear of the vehicle itself with then more frequent maintenance work (oil, fluids, tires, etc); and last but not least a huge depreciation in the value of the vehicles (coupled with lower resale value). Not to mention the billions of dollars sent to Arab countries for an ever growing supply of fuel, that monumental volume of money expended to import fuel from this region of the world creates fortunes over there which often foment and finance extremist groups masterminding new plots against America and America’s Interest abroad (guess has just seized large portions of Iraq). Large part of this money would then stay right here at home creating wealthy and prosperity. Concomitantly, as a direct result in the drop in consumption and thus demand for petrol and its derivative there would be less pressure on the price of fuel and thus lower gas prices at the pump (so even the detractors of the fast rail system would benefit; henceforth, both systems are not mutually exclusive but clearly they are complementary and accessory to each others existence)

    Some republic governors whose administration refused to take the federal money in order to build a modern fast rail mode of transportation argued that they would not get the money given that their roadways was still in a state of disrepair… Well, guess what: such things are unrelated. If one would take federal money to plant flowers on the edging the roadway shoulders — thus beautifying the roadways — then they would be related. They are as unrelated in the similar way that building new runways for airports would be unrelated; and neither are they mutually exclusive in any way, shape, or form. It is really absurd that politician occupying important position in the high sphere and echelon within the mantra of the public administration are capable of such bizarre and grotesque articulation.

    The incumbent governor Kasich refused the federal funds for the project arguing future financial woes. Whenever one incurs in infrastructure projects that benefit millions of people there need to be a certain volume of investments purported by the government. Given that the initial volume of investment is large, the return over the investment is long, and the risk is high; this of project that can only be undertaken by the public entity in the form of the public government whose primary goal is to further the public interest and benefit of the public for now and for the foreseeable future. Besides, it has been the case in the whole civilized and developed world possess much larger and faster rail systems than the one currently proposed to Ohio, maybe Ohio does not belong to the civilized and developed world ( Japan, Germany, etc, possess for a long time a much larger, faster, sophisticated and way more expansive fast rail system than the one currently proposed to Ohio) and thus can not afford to have such facilities available to its population.

    Did you know that the average American pay more in taxes than the average Japanese. So, how come they can have amazing marvels of technology such as the bullet train to further its modern and dynamic society and augment their quality of life; and we can not even afford to have a slightly faster train.

    in reply to: Sales Taxes on Food in Ohio #1042226

    tk3000
    Participant

    But still this whole thing of sugar added equals tax added = ludicrous. Besides everything (from tomato sauce to ice cream) has glucose on it. Also, eating in or eating out can be very relative. Thanks for the input!

    in reply to: Sales Taxes on Food in Ohio #1041027

    tk3000
    Participant

    Glad I always drink black coffee. With no tax added, just black.

    in reply to: Photovoltaic/Solar Panels Residential Use in Columub #1034782

    tk3000
    Participant

    Apart from installing the solar panels in my roof, I have done some roof work in the past; and I do not see it as an issue at all. Of course, it depends on the size of the solar array,etc, and it is mostly labor. Normally solar panel are held in place by brackets attached to the roof by screws with robber seals and calked to avert moisture build up over time. So, in case you need to replace the roof you would need to simply remove the solar panels from the brackets, then unscrew the brackets from the roof; once new roof is installed simply drill holes for the brackets, install then, and put the solar panels in place again.

    in reply to: Photovoltaic/Solar Panels Residential Use in Columub #1034710

    tk3000
    Participant

    derm: thanks for the links and hint. Need to scale up eventually. Right now I Using 105 Ah deep cycle batteries (not agm ones though), smart and future reach charge controller, low dc voltage wires, and led dc lights throughout. Also, I am using switched voltage regulators (not linear ones) when necessary to step up or step down the dc voltage, the following:

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/5-pcs-DC-DC-LM2596-Power-Supply-Step-Down-Adjustable-Converter-Module1-3V-35V-/130984321712?tfrom=141082066753&tpos=top&ttype=coupon&talgo=undefined

    Mostly everything nowdays (exception of large appliances) uses DC. And it is amazing how efficient the cheap power supplies can be: a typical notebook power supply can be only 50% efficient.

    Ned23: Good to know! It is amazing how the price point went down, a 100 watt solar panel nowadays costs 1% of the its price back in the 70s (it is certainly much smaller too).

    Mostly everything nowsdays (exception of large appliances) uses DC. And it is amazing how inefficient the cheap power supplies can be: a typical notebook power supply often is only 50% efficient. Thus the need to use DC voltage throughout. But I also have a pure sine wave inverter for AC inductive loads if needed.

    One of the main problems I have are very large trees nearby. And of course the winter with its short cloudy days, thus the need to use wind turbines as well.

    in reply to: Franklin County Property Value Update 2014 #1034310

    tk3000
    Participant

    I also got the new evaluations sheets. But at around $2,700 in property taxes per year I would imagine that my property is over evaluated for tax purposes, so about two months ago I filed a request for reevaluation with the Frankin County Assessor. On occasion of filing such request I filled out the required forms, and providing extra pertinent documentation, etc, but I have not heard from then so far. So I was wondering whether or not anyone would have any experience with the process and the likely outcomes.

    Thanks,
    tk3000

    in reply to: Online Sales Taxes #1031284

    tk3000
    Participant

    I see, but as consumers how likely are individuals to proactively remit the tax to the State?

    in reply to: Online Sales Taxes #1031043

    tk3000
    Participant

    My understanding is that if one purchase an item online whose retailer and its warehouse do not have presence within the State, then one would not pay sales taxes over the item. So, isn’t that the case in Ohio? As of now, in MI at least that is the case.

    There are lots of seller based in places like Hong Kong who ship to the USA. And, believe it or not, often it is cheap (and getting faster all the time) to ship from China directly to the continental USA than shipping from within the USA.

    Does not the government extort too much money from its people already..

    in reply to: Condo in Reynoldsburg #1027416

    tk3000
    Participant

    But the truly most distressing part of any real estate negotiation is dealing with realtors: nothing but unnecessary, uneducated and illiterate middlemen who pretend to be doctors; one could say, very expensive door openers.

    in reply to: Condo in Reynoldsburg #1027043

    tk3000
    Participant

    neekap: Where is your condo located? I hope you will find a suitable buyer soon.

    buckeyecpa, neekap: Hopefully, I will be able to sell my condo in Lansing, MI, sooner than later. I understand the point of keeping the ratio rental/owner occupied to a certain level, but I believe that it should be dictate by the market conditions. Besides, allowing some owners to rent whilst barring others from doing so likely would create contentions and lawsuits.

    On top of that there are so many anomalies in a condo living situation and even construction standards: I lived in a condo whereon somebody’s else sewer line (pipe) went visibly and exposed into my basement, guess what would happen if the old cast iron pipe would crack. Nobody’ s sewer line should ever be interconnecte, they should merely converge to the same end point. There should be a clear separation and independence between such utilities (sewer, electrical [have had other’s electrical wire running into my basement ceiling for that matter], water, etc). Often builders cut all possible corner to go cheap. There are so many strict codes and rules for mostly everything in a house, but in a condo there is an abherration in the making all the time to a point whereby the standards of construction in Somalia would seem much better than many condominium complexes built over here. So, it seems to be a good idea to look into the blueprints of the construction.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 35 total)

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