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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 257 total)
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  • in reply to: The Only Way to Give Columbus a True Identity #521966

    swan
    Participant

    Hey there – infrequent reader, extremely infrequent poster but I’m keen to chime in here because I’m a little bit surprised at how quickly people discredit the original poster as “too new to know what he’s talking about” , rather than, say, entertain his position for conversation sake. I would first discredit the extremely popular notion that if you’ve lived in Columbus longer, you’ve cultivated more experience therefore you’re more knowledgeable pertaining to the city and how it compares to others in relation to future growth. I think the example par excellence of this is the cheerful naivety of ChrisSunami. I say this because even though he has only lived in Columbus for one year, the original poster has made some very acute and well-founded observations, although presented them in a far too polarized way.

    The first thing I would do is drop the discussion that an “identity” is important to attracting future talent. Identity is an abstract concept used to classify things. No more, no less – and it takes very real things to attract talent to an area.

    I think you have to ask the question, where does the value lie within the city, and how do we use this value to create productive relationships, in relation to housing and the workplace. It sure isn’t having a sandwich named after you. Capitalizing on existing relationships (the arts scene, major stakeholders in the area, etc) and tailoring future development to those needs is a good way to create the type of environment which will attract higher value relationships and talent to a city (the creatives would be one of those categories).

    Whether the city is or isn’t supporting the arts community seems to be debatable in this thread, but the fact of the matter is that it isn’t a resounding yes… and it certainly isn’t providing the type of support found in other cities. Look at the development of Hamburg, Tel Aviv, Berlin or Tainan and you’ll see cities which have their political and social ideals in line to be conducive for future growth. Also, discrediting larger cities as if they belong in some other category and have nothing to show us is absurd. It’s no coincidence that the Fitzrovia/Bloomsbury area of London is full of media start-ups and creative types. There are organizations in place like The Welcome Trust and educational institutions such as the University College of London which actively encourage the development of mutually beneficial relationships. Those companies are there because they don’t want to be anywhere else in the world and that’s the type of ambition that the active developments and political parties of Columbus need to have.

    Unfortunately it seems that the political parties, land owners, and most of the population would agree with the poster Polis’ mentality that all development is good, and we can’t say no and we want tax revenue etc. What a city needs is to develop the tools – whether through the creation of land holding entities or stronger planning departments – to resist developer avarice looking for short term profit rather than adding long-term value to a city. Through looking at projects posted on this site, it’s appears the vision that Columbus has for itself is, as the original poster correctly pointed out, normalcy.

    Nearly every project I’ve seen excels at creating quantum rather than quality (the Bexley masterplan, every development with a ubiquitous trendy name like tribeca, the near east side development). The developments create generic living and working environments and the city approves them. The buildings have little relationship to the street, the streets don’t work to create the characteristics to support neighborhood life, fundamental elements which give qualities to urban areas (hierarchy, balance, differentiation) are absent. No need to beat a dead horse here.

    Anyway, that’s my take. I studied at Ohio State, I have lived in downtown Columbus for years, I moved to NYC (and I lived in Tribeca), I now live in London. My research focuses on the generative potential of social inclusivity and the complexities of the 21st century multi-cultural city. I essentially focus on how to reposition cities to be more viable in a global market… and I’m hungover so I apologize if this seems a bit disjointed. Cheers.

    in reply to: Help Needed – What would make Ohio/Columbus Cool? #441354

    swan
    Participant

    a light rail!

    in reply to: 8 reasons Comfest can cause suicidal fantasies #383402

    swan
    Participant

    …you are so awkward.

    in reply to: LEED Green Associate Certification Preparation Courses #378228

    swan
    Participant

    I’d be extremely surprised if your house met any of the prerequisites in any of the categories, let alone attain enough points for certification. And who is going to recognize a garage as a leader in energy and environmental design? haha you have a lot more studying to do.

    Being LEED certified really doesn’t mean anything anymore, for an individual or on a resume. It’s just another interchangeable acronym to add to an email signature.

    Although educating the public on sustainable practices through design will always be beneficial.

    in reply to: Starcraft II #127702

    swan
    Participant

    holy cow. i’m going to deliberately not buy this game until winter.

    in reply to: Hating the Ohio Union #357455

    swan
    Participant

    not trying to beat a dead horse… but here’s a great video that concerns the subject of aesthetics and beauty vs ugly and a paycheck in relation to making money as a designer.

    it’s overly clear that the union falls into the latter category.

    it’s also completely hilarious how emotionally invested certain people in this thread have become despite having no formal understanding (or really any understanding) of the profession but are still more than willing to put down other people based on their opinions.


    swan
    Participant

    ha!

    in reply to: Briarcliff MX Ohio’s Premier Motocross Facility #360732

    swan
    Participant

    oh also, if you go onto the pitracer.com message board and put in a request for novice riding partners… you’d probably get a whole bunch of really nice people who’d love to ride with you and show you some tracks.

    in reply to: Briarcliff MX Ohio’s Premier Motocross Facility #360731

    swan
    Participant

    that’s an amazing offer and i’d take you up on it in a heartbeat… but theres a 90% chance i’m moving to NYC next week… just out of curiosity… what type of bikes do you have?

    in reply to: Briarcliff MX Ohio’s Premier Motocross Facility #360728

    swan
    Participant

    haha well if you’ve been to scenic highlands + briarcliff i’d love to hear what you think.

    also, i’m not trying to disprove you, just offering up other places to ride that are absolutely mind-blowing incredible.

    i sold both of my bikes when i moved to italy a few years back and haven’t really gotten back into the sport since… i miss it everyday, especially when we have weather like today. le sigh.

    also, for ohios PREMIERE MOTOCROSS WEBSITE… check out pitracer.com

    in reply to: Briarcliff MX Ohio’s Premier Motocross Facility #360726

    swan
    Participant

    oh you’d be fine blammo… i’ve raced MX since I was four years old and six days a week since i was around 12… i’ve never seen a novice get landed on in practice. Any experienced rider would have no problem going around you… i’d also recommend you get into it ASAP because MX is really the most fun you can have with your clothes on.

    also, anyone who refers to Briarcliff has “Ohio’s Premiere Facility” has never raced Scenic Highlands… they’re not even close to being the same tier. I’d also put Beans Road, Dirtworld and Spring Valley ahead of Briafcliff… although it is a pretty good track.

    Scenic Highlands —> http://www.ohiomotocross.com/

    in reply to: Hating the Ohio Union #357407

    swan
    Participant

    enormous tall monolithic masonry rectangles? surely you’re being facetious. people we’re having this exact same conversation via smoke signals, hand gestures and cave drawings back in the 60s and 70s.

    in reply to: Hating the Ohio Union #357398

    swan
    Participant

    drew wrote >>

    gramarye wrote >>
    I have trouble with the notion that only those who have formal architectural training are qualified to “critically support or defend the Union.” If the issue is how well it meshes with the other campus buildings nearby and its aesthetic effects on High Street, I don’t see why one would need an architectural degree for that.

    If you haven’t been permanently scarred by a critique from Peter Eisenman, you’ll be considered unfit to judge architecture by those who have.
    In other words, I agree with you.

    HAHA what a great video! i love how kipnis is just sitting out of frame and closes it out. In my 2nd year I saw a 6th year graduate student told by Eisenmann that he has no business being an architect and should seriously consider switching majors. Talk about disheartening…

    in reply to: Hating the Ohio Union #357378

    swan
    Participant

    this conversation took place back when they released the original renderings and elevations of the proposed design.

    also, by a significant margin, it is the most expensive student union in the country. in case that exacerbates anyone enough to continue with the always entertaining design-inspired ranting which without fail, follows every development in columbus, regardless of scale.

    in reply to: Post a Funny Photo / GIF / Video / Etc #228784

    swan
    Participant

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 257 total)

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