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Viewing 10 posts - 226 through 235 (of 235 total)
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  • spfld_expat
    spfld_expat
    Participant

    reggiano1 said:
    And once the “newness” wears off (which I really hope it does, but doubt it will)- There is baseball season which will have it’s share of fans looking for a “sports bar” and then you will have the beloved Buckeye football season.

    To be fair, baseball season shouldn’t be too bad. Mostly just Reds/Indians/(clippers) fans looking for a place to have a few beers and watch the game. Of course, there are few places to escape the standard OSU nonsense in Columbus on game days. I feel for you on the parking, but I’m “optimistic” that it will get better. I’ve been to several WLs, and none of them have been as slammed as this one is. I have to imagine its just the place’s novelty + OSU’s run in the NCAA tournament causing a lot of the current trouble. Hang in there!

    Sports Bars get a bad rap. At least WL is fighting the good fight WRT a very nice beer selection.

    in reply to: Sewer Tunnel Train #537674
    spfld_expat
    spfld_expat
    Participant

    GCrites80s said:
    In the States though, motorcycling developed an image problem because of the movie “The Wild One” all the way back in the ’50s. The movie’s premise was flawed as compared to the actual events of the incident, but it didn’t matter. It took a lot of work to shake that image somewhat but motorcyclists are still seen as hellions with a death wish. In other countries it’s considered just another way to get around. There’s a lot of resistance to being seen as a “motorcycle person”.

    I would say motorcycle’s real image problem is that it is an expensive hobby for old timers:

    Harley, You’re Not Getting Any Younger

    “The average age of a Harley rider is 49, up from 42 five years ago.”

    in reply to: New Pope Chosen #536092
    spfld_expat
    spfld_expat
    Participant

    FSonicSmith said:
    Walker; while I have utmost respect for you and how you handle being owner/administrator, it pays to have a sense of humor. In 2013 a bunch of very old men in Rome play politics under the rubric of “divine intervention” and choose a Pope with all the attendant rite and ritual and pomp and circumstance. Forget about all the other issues the Church faces and it is still a bit farcical. No more farcical than the over-the-top attention the press and media gave to the Carnival Cruise ship being towed into port but that proves the point-yes the media cater to the masses rather than what is truly important. Nothing titillates the public like a bunch of people being stuck on a ship with shit rolling down the halls. The tail wags the dog. Whatever happened to the Fourth Estate. Well, it died, intestate. Without a will, Walker. Forgive the puns.

    According to some, this pope could be the last pope…

    Prophecy of the Popes

    in reply to: Restaurant Rants #535604
    spfld_expat
    spfld_expat
    Participant

    groundrules said:
    ah, the ol’ Webster’s cut/paste! a sure fire way to win the internet! </tip>

    Also, the beginning of every high school graduation speech ever.

    “Webster’s dictionary defines success/friendship/achievement/whatever as blah blah blah…”

    in reply to: Restaurant Rants #535579
    spfld_expat
    spfld_expat
    Participant

    buckette13 said:
    Pro tip:

    I hate to say this, but for all of you tippers out there, please remember most servers prefer cash tips. :)

    How people do their taxes is their own business, but if servers want to be tipped cash so they can cheat on taxes I don’t want anything to do with it.

    After all, serving is a profession, and professionals gotta pay their taxes!

    in reply to: Restaurant Rants #535514
    spfld_expat
    spfld_expat
    Participant

    Dotson said:
    Here is my rant regarding change. When I am at a restaurant and the server brings back my change, but does not bring back the change (ie. 26 cents or whatever it is). Why are you assuming that I am giving this to you? I have a zero tolerance policy with this and you earn 0 for a tip if this occurs.

    Oh yeah, that’s a huge pet peeve for me, too. I find it incredibly lazy, rude, and disrespectful. The one time in my life I stiffed a server was when that happened to me.

    in reply to: Easton Gateway #513155
    spfld_expat
    spfld_expat
    Participant

    jbcmh81 said:
    We need some giant bling on the Scioto.

    Damn straight, dramatic public art = swagger.

    in reply to: Easton Gateway #513142
    spfld_expat
    spfld_expat
    Participant

    Only on CU would a relatively innocuous thread that started 5 months ago about a shopping mall expansion turn into “who are we?” “Why are we here?” “What will the future bring?” (that may sound snarky, but I say it with affection).

    Anyway, forget zoning, light rail, walkable neighborhoods, bike lanes and all that. Mike Coleman was right, what Columbus needs is SWAGGER.

    in reply to: Most Americans Want a Walkable Neighborhood, Not a Big House #480960
    spfld_expat
    spfld_expat
    Participant

    I think a lot more of that issue is perception than real crime. I know lots of people who are nervous to walk on Parsons Ave. I don’t, however, know anyone who’s actually been a victim of crime on Parsons Ave.

    It happens a lot more than you would think. All over the city, really.

    https://www.crimereports.com/map/index/?search=Columbus+OH

    in reply to: Columbus Economy – News & Updates #529496
    spfld_expat
    spfld_expat
    Participant

    InnerCore said:
    But that is the primary reason. People aren’t living in Cincinnati or Cleveland and saying “man I need to move to Columbus because its so cool”. They’re moving to find a job, any job.

    Honestly, I think the emphasis you put on the sheer number of new residents the “cool” cities attract is misplaced. I think the “job-based” growth Columbus sees in the long run does much more for sustainably growing our city.

    I grew up in a dying rust-belt town (Springfield) and I new a lot of people who fled for greener pastures elsewhere. It always seemed crazy to me to pack up and move cross-country on the basis of moving to a cool city, so I moved to Columbus for practical reasons (work). I was always somewhat jealous of those that moved to Cool places like Portland and Austin.

    However, a decade later it is amazing how many of those people returned to Ohio after languishing for a few years in low level service or retail jobs. The fact is the job market in those places is incredibly competitive, so it is extremely difficult to hack it long term.

    So maybe the so-called cool cities attract more transplants on a net basis year-in year-out, but how long do they stay? Do they put down roots, start careers, buy homes, send kids to school, and otherwise truly join and grow the community? I would love to see some sort of retention rate statistic showing how long new residents stay in various cities. In other words, if someone moves to Columbus, Denver, Portland, or wherever, how likely are they to still be living there in 5 years, 10 years, etc.? I think Columbus-style growth means we gain AND keep residents more than a lot of other cities. (Obviously, I have no empirical data to support this, it is just my theory based on my personal anecdotal experience, so ymmv).

Viewing 10 posts - 226 through 235 (of 235 total)

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