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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 130 total)
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  • in reply to: Cutting the Wire – Goodbye Cable TV #1062758

    sirlancelot
    Participant

    We dropped Time Warner cable two weeks ago. It is not worth $75 a month for the majority of channels we do not watch. Yes, there are a few channels I miss but overall, over-the-air tv works just as well. The public library has plenty of DVD movies to choose from. Also, I notice that the cable channels rerun the same movies for months on end. In a word, cable tv is BORING and EXPENSIVE!

    in reply to: Police Brutality & Violence in the US #1052366

    sirlancelot
    Participant

    What is not clear to me is whether or not Michael Brown was the same person ID’d for shoplifting; why was he and another man walking in the middle of a busy street; what did the police officer actually say to Brown and how did Brown respond. Right now, everything I see and hear points to an person who failed to obey a lawful police request, who acted in a disrespectful manner, and was perceived to be a threat to a police officer. There seems to be a divergence of fact and fiction. Obviously, the courts and the Feds will review the case.

    People must teach their children about how to deal with law enforcement and so avoid situations like Ferguson. Requests to answer reasonable questions from law enforcement and obey legitimate orders, or demands to provide ID, is not police abuse, but standard procedure. Brown apparently did not learn that, and that is why he is dead. I was taught to say yes sir or no sir to police questions, not cuss or threaten an officer, to keep my hands visible and NOT do anything that could be perceived as a threat.

    Distrust of law enforcement in minority communities is understandable, given the history of bias and violence by police and government. That distrust cannot justify disrespect toward people we pay to enforce laws we all are supposed to obey.

    in reply to: OSU Fires Band Director Jon Waters #1036030

    sirlancelot
    Participant

    What I find amazing is how Ohio State went about removing a popular marching band director and the justifications used. One assumes they have competent legal counsel but it looks like the situation was badly handled. Obviously, we are not privy to all the facts but the methods here do not jive when compared with similar situations. What matters is how things appear, and it appears that Mr. Waters was treated unjustly. If the issues had been handled correctly, there would be no need for a second investigation.

    Second, I have heard a rumor that the real reason why Waters was fired is that he is a conservative Christian and some people are uncomfortable. I am not a conservative Christian but if personal lifestyles or beliefs play are an issue here, Ohio State University will lose much more than a marching band director.

    in reply to: Israel Palestine Conflict #1034087

    sirlancelot
    Participant

    The core issue (to me) is the inability of some Arab/Muslim groups to accept the right of Jews to their own state in that area commonly called Palestine. The Israelis don’t seem to have a problem with an Arab-run Palestine, except for some details. We really need to redefine what Palestine is, that area used to comprise, before 1917, the region which includes present day Israel, Gaza, the West Bank, Lebanon, much of Syria and Jordan east of the Jordan River. That the region has been under Muslim domination since the 8th/9th century does not diminish that Jewish claims. That Mohammed is alleged to have ascended into heaven from the Temple Mount, in Jerusalem, does not diminish Jewish claims to their homeland. The only significant issue here, beyond Jewish claims, are the rights of non-Jews (i.e. Arabs) to self governance in Palestine, who have been a majority since the 9th century. So, the question now is whether or not different peoples can co-exist and share the land and its resources. We see what is happening elsewhere in the Middle East (Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan) to know the answer.

    If Hamas leaders were smart, they’de recognise a Jewish state (Israel) and negotiate a practical social and economic solution for Gaza. This would legitimise and solidify their control. If Arab leaders in the Palestinian Authority (West Bank) were smart, they’de stop militant Arabs from terror attacks in Israel and Jews, and negotiate a practical solution that also would legitimise and solidify their rule. If the Israelis are smart, they’de provide an economic stimulus for the West Bank and Gaza equal to efforts on Israeli settlement expansion. Employed, middle class Arabs who know their children will have a better future are far less likely to engage in terrorism. Second, Palestinian refugee camps should be shut down and refugees assimilated into Jordan and the West Bank, providing them with economic opportunities, and would drastically reduce the terrorism threat. Third, allow Palestinians a West Bank corridor to Arab Jerusalem, from where they can govern. The two states should then establish permanent boundaries, allowing the free movement of people and commerce, and the Palestinian state allow reestablishment of symbolic historic Orthodox Jewish communities that existed since Roman times. Israel would compensate Arabs and direct heirs, who lost their homes in Israel after the 1948 war. Arab states would compensate Jews who fled those states and settled in Israel after 1948. Israel would have the right to take action to defend itself terrorist actions.

    This seems a very sensible strategy but the Middle East has nas never been sensible from our POV. Americans should know that Western sensibilities are not often shared elsewhere.

    in reply to: Ohio Governor's Race 2014 #1034077

    sirlancelot
    Participant

    Kasich and the Ohio GOP should be very careful about the political mudslinging. It works both ways and Kasich may find his own closet door opened. I agree that the Fitzgerald driver’s license issue is fair game. What he was doing at 4:30 am, with a unknown woman in his car, and no evidence of criminal conduct, should be a private matter.

    in reply to: Strippers Protest at Ohio Church #1034071

    sirlancelot
    Participant

    Two things. The church might have more Sunday attendance from men if they know they get to ogle some bare chested ladies. Second, protests can go both ways. If New Beginnings Church is upset with strippers demonstrating outside, perhaps the church should reconsider picketing a legitimate business.

    in reply to: Obamacare / Healthcare Reform – News & Discussion #948385

    sirlancelot
    Participant

    I am still waiting for a response from the State Of Ohio to my insurance sign-up, via the federal website. This was in January. I received a confirmation (early February) call from the federal site, and they said that my application information was transferred to Ohio and I would be contacted by Ohio. Is this the normal response from Ohio or do I have to call someone? A friend of mine also signed up via the federal website and qualified for Medicaid, and so far, has heard nothing from Ohio’s health insurance exchange. One wonders if Ohio Republicans hope to discourage people from participation through bureaucratic inaction.

    in reply to: Nationwide Children's Hospital – News & Discussion #458105

    sirlancelot
    Participant

    I used to live near the area, and it looks better now than 10 years ago. What NCH should be doing is assist in creating more local affordable housing options for both area residents and lower salaried employees.

    in reply to: Suburban Poverty #365799

    sirlancelot
    Participant

    There are lots of poor people in the suburbs, but they are less visible. I live in S.E Columbus/Madison Township and I can assure you that there is as much poverty here as in Old Town East. Just think about the area around Eastland Mall. I moved out here last year and I feel safer downtown. Poverty is poverty no matter where but it comes down to a matter of definition. A nanny who lives in Bexley, making $20,000 annually, is obviously poor when compared to her employer, an executive power couple with two kids. I have no answer to the solving the poverty problem but I can say that a poor person should be treated with as much respect as Les Wexner.

    Further, it is in the best interest of business and the upper class to reduce the poverty rate, if only to preserve their power and lifestyle. If the gap between the rich and poor continues to widen and if the social safety net is eliminated, as pointed out in an article last year from Forbes, social unrest, civil war and the collapse of the United States is inevitable.

    in reply to: Las Vegas #554727

    sirlancelot
    Participant

    If you visit LV for more than a few days, I recommend a day trip to Hoover Dam, the Valley Of Fire State Park, and Red Rock Canyon (not necessarily in one trip). If one goes to the Grand Canyon, you can go or return via Route 66 in AZ and get a feel of how U.S. travel used be. I would avoid LV in summer unless one likes temps of 100-115 degrees daytime. A good website that covers LV events and reviews hotels and attractions is Vegas4visitors.com.

    in reply to: Working visa for the States #555019

    sirlancelot
    Participant

    AnnaRos, you should contact an attorney who specialises in immigration law. The Columbus Bar Association can refer you to one. You also might want to check out some legal references on immigration law (Steele On Immigration, for example) which are updated frequently because they cover green cards and work visas. The application process is complex with frequent changes in rules and forms. If you are a student, that might affect your eligibility.

    in reply to: Dang Jehovah Witnesses #554711

    sirlancelot
    Participant

    My exoerience has been that a simple “no thank you” to peddlers who visit my door will suffice. If the same people keep returning, then contact their church or organisation and complain. If visits continue, call the police and have the visitors cited. As for appearing naked at the door, I don’t recommend it because one could be arrested for public indecency, or worse, an old hag might get turned on! This reminds of a story I heard when I was a kid: Mother was raking grass clippings next to the flower garden, located next to the street. A woman was walking by and carrying a portable record player which was playing a vicious anti-Catholic sermon. We aren’t Catholic but that didn’t stop mother from taking the rake and beating the hell out of that woman and chasing her down street. The Baptists never came back.

    in reply to: 'Stand Your Ground' Legislation in Ohio #489571

    sirlancelot
    Participant

    My brother-in-law and nephew are in law enforcement and oppose “stand your ground” legislation because too many people are not trained in firearms safety, or they are incompetent to know when to use a gun. The stand-your-ground legislation does not make one safer at home. In life threatening situations outside the home, one may do whatever is necessary to preserve life, subject to circumstances. This is why in shooting cases such as Trayvon Martin, the accused shooter must prove there were no other options except use of a firearm.

    in reply to: Housing Value Change showing Gentrification? #554934

    sirlancelot
    Participant

    sirlancelot said:
    Walker indicates that gentrification is less of an issue in areas where there is less population density. Density is not the real issue. Rather, it is the conversion and renovation of older housing stock to make them more profitable, or creation of additional but more expensive housing. Gentrification means housing marketed toward upper income people.

    The Near East Side may have lower population density but the housing stock is predominately older, thus less expensive and more affordable to lower income people. As that area becomes gentrified, the housing stock will become more valuable and thus less affordable to the current low income residents. This is what happened in German Village.

    The situation begs the question of where all of these low income people will live. A reduction in habitable, affordable housing has huge social implications which include increasing crime and homelessness. Note the Columbus Dispatch articles on problem landlords, lack of affordable housing and the increase of homelessness here.

    By the way, I lived for 16 years in downtown Columbus and recently relocated outside the city. While I appreciate the continued development of downtown, it has become too expensive for people like me.

    in reply to: Housing Value Change showing Gentrification? #554933

    sirlancelot
    Participant

    Walker indicates that gentrification is less of an issue in areas where there is less population density. Density is not the real issue. Rather, it is the conversion and renovation of older housing stock to make them more profitable, or creation of additional but more expensive housing. gentrification means housing marketed toward upper income people.

    The Near East Side may have lower population density but the housing stock is predominately older, thus less expensive and more affordable to lower income people. As that area becomes gentrified, the housing stock will become more valuable and thus less affordable to the current low income residents. This is what happened in German Village.

    The situation begs the question of where all of these low income people will live. A reduction in habitable, affordable housing has huge social implications which include increasing crime and homelessness. Note the Columbus Dispatch articles on problem landlords, lack of affordable housing and the increase of homelessness here.

    By the way, I lived for 16 years in downtown Columbus and recently relocated outside the city. While I appreciate the continued development of downtown, it has become too expensive for people like me.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 130 total)

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