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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 539 total)
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  • in reply to: 2015 Columbus Metro and County Population Estimates #1127522

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    Sheer necessity will force the issue, even in places where there has been great opposition to it. I suspect though that we may be more likely to see it first in places like NE Ohio that aren’t really growing anymore and that face a sustained crisis due infrastructural breakdown, a declining tax base and aging demographics–problems that I don’t see for Columbus/Central Ohio for quite some time.

    in reply to: 2015 Columbus Metro and County Population Estimates #1127445

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    At this rate, Columbus’ population will be at 900k by 2020. Barring any dramatic changes in current trends, we could very easily see 1 million people within the city proper limits before 2030.

    It will be curious to see what impact Columbus’ continued growth has on the rest of the state, and on the multi-state region in general. Columbus and Indianapolis remain the only two major Midwestern cities that have been seeing steady population growth from decade to decade. Even Chicago has stagnated and lost population in recent years, and is actually in danger now of being overtaken by Houston as the third largest US city.

    At some point, I wonder if Cleveland and Cincinnati seek to take one or more drastic measures to avoid becoming complete afterthoughts in a state where the capital has become the principal city on so many fronts and no longer merely serves as the seat of state government. As politically untenable as city-county consolidations and between-city mergers have been, Dayton being only the latest to stop a proposal dead in its tracks, I can’t help but think that both NE and SW Ohio, and perhaps Toledo/NW Ohio as well will eventually look at and finally act on these, and even more radical restructuring measures of some kind, just to stay relevant and viable as metropolitan areas, and other rust belt cities outside of Ohio like Pittsburgh and Buffalo may very well join them, or even pave the way. Declining suburbs and crumbling infrastructure will each exact huge tolls on take a huge toll on political barriers to change.

    in reply to: Idea: Relocating Crew Stadium to the Arena District #1127224

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    Maybe it’s where I sit. I’ll grant you the tailgating culture, though. You are on point as far as that not being duplicated Downtown.

    in reply to: Idea: Relocating Crew Stadium to the Arena District #1127216

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    So Lowe’s, the State Fairgrounds, and I-71 all count as a neighborhood? Likening this to the area surrounding Wrigley in Chicago seems like a stretch. A very long one.

    In any case, I don’t see any of the romantic/nostalgic appeal you suggest. You can’t even see the downtown skyline much from where Crew Stadium is located. It might be in Columbus, but we kinda say the same thing about Polaris too.

    Moving the team and stadium downtown to the Arena District would definitely be a huge improvement for them both on multiple fronts.

    in reply to: Ward System for Columbus City Council – News & Updates #1126700

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>jbcmh81 wrote:</div>
    Aside from the corruption discussion, I also see another potential problem. While the idea of more representation for all neighborhoods is a good one, I worry that this would just turn into each one fighting for a piece of the pie for their own agendas rather than supporting any true unified direction for the city at large. I’m not really sure the goal should be pitting one neighborhood against another for attention. The tone of the debate in media has already been that way to some extent, with the arguments against Downtown projects.

    I think an even mix of at-large representation and ward-district representation would be the best solution. Creating 20 wards (representing around 4,000 people each) and having 20 at-large representation would be a good way to combat corruption. The equal representation gives the city a vision while ensuring that ward representatives are included in the discussion in order for it to pass. Vice versa, if the wards unify for something this already benefits the city and can also ensure that the at-large representation can’t dictate policy.

    The current city government simply can not keep up with the fact that Columbus is expanding so fast. We need better representation of the residents. Not only diverse, but also more voices. Increasing the city council from 7 representatives to 40 would increase the voices as well as increase creativity and more discussion at the city level.

    This is similar to what I suggested above, but I think it would also go along way towards actually addressing some of the issues that are raising growing concerns about the current city council system.

    A balance of at-large and ward reps would be a good compromise, rather than going with other models that favor ward-dominated council arrangements with a few token at-large reps. Having more reps overall AND equal numbers of each type would provide for meaningful representation at the community level (wards) without completely losing sight of the “big picture” direction and outlook of the city itself, items that tend to be the focus of at-large reps. At-large reps also keep City Council from devolving into an arena for perpetual conflicts between communities with competing and even adversarial interests and agendas.

    Along with having the two types of reps, ward and at-large, the actual number of reps must be addressed as well. More reps overall would definitely be better than the current seven for a city of 850k and growing, but where wards are concerned in particular, that number needs to take into account factors like average community population, as well as diversity–racial/ethnic, sexual, living arrangements, economic, etc. I would rather see a higher number of wards that give more communities and a wider range of people a voice (and a reasonable compromise for single-member districts), than a much smaller number that tends to work to the benefit of the most privileged in a given community.

    Either this, or create fewer wards overall that correspond to community boundaries as much as possible, but with proportionally-allocated multi-member districts.

    in reply to: Ward System for Columbus City Council – News & Updates #1126607

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    NDaEast, what is there to stop a Ward-based City Council from also appointing replacement council reps to fill vacancies on a near-perpetual basis? Having ward reps does not make a City Council any more immune to, or even adverse to, the practice.

    As for sponsorship and heredity factoring into the people who get positions, that pretty much happens with all elected offices, with or without voter approval. Even when people do have the chance to vote, why is it that they often push the button for the candidates with names that they know, more often than they vote for those with names that they are unfamiliar with? In Ohio, the Taft and DeWine families seem to benefit from this, while on a national level, who doesn’t know of the Kennedys, the Bushes, and the Clintons?

    I think you need a different angle for your argument, because what you propose to replace the current at-large council system with really is more like rearranging the chairs on the deck of the Titanic than it would be a fundamental improvement in municipal governance. Even if you were to be successful, I think you would ultimately be disappointed with the end result when most of the problems you cite in the current system resurface in uncannily similar ways.

    Personally, I wonder if we’re getting to the point in our politics, both locally and nationally, where it’s time for more of a European-style model of governance? Maybe we should have a City Council with 30 or so representatives, and with 10 or so of them being elected at-large, and the remaining 20 or so being allocated based upon some combination of party affiliation and ward/district?

    One thing I have never been a fan of are single-member, “winner-take-all” districts at any level. The very setup is antithetical to democracy and is what has given us the overly reductive and awful two-party binary system of politics that we have today. Elected office always seems to be a “one or the other” deal in the US, which is why I think people are increasingly seeking out extreme alternatives to traditional Republicans and Democrats. Maybe it is time we acknowledge that not everything is a one or the other proposition, and that there are multiple shades of gray and points of compromise along the political spectrum?

    in reply to: Ward System for Columbus City Council – News & Updates #1126558

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    Ward systems aren’t the answer to everything. You can still get corrupt people who who can hold onto a ward and the rest of the city can’t do anything to unseat them. People are always looking for some kind of outside answer to the problems that they create with their own votes.

    This has always been my critique of city council ward systems elsewhere. I’m not patently against them, but it is disingenuous of advocates for implementing a ward system in Columbus to suggest that making such a change will eliminate the flaws and corruption inherent in the current all-at-large representative system.

    Your ward-based council rep would still have just as many opportunities to be out of touch and corrupt as any given at-large council rep currently does, and they won’t necessarily even be restricted to their area of representation.

    in reply to: Apartments/retail at Grandview Giant Eagle? #1126032

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    I figured it was only a matter of time. With Balboa and the Grandview Theater reopening, and the Grandview Cafe still to come, the Grandview Ave corridor is booming right now, too much so for such a lot and property to remain underused indefinitely. My guess is that we’ll probably see something quite similar to the View on Fifth, mixed use–apartments, with ground-level storefronts along Grandview and Fifth Avenues.

    I agree that a parking deck with a couple of public/open access levels would be very helpful here, particularly since so many have gotten used to using the old GE lot to get around paying the meters on the Columbus side of Grandview Ave. Personally, I don’t expect it to be free, though I’m sure a fee and the loss of parking spaces will likely be met with people seeking out parking on Broadview Ave and other nearby streets.

    in reply to: NBA in Columbus ? #1125900

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    Sorry guys, this pretty much suggests the NBA isn’t happening in Columbus anytime soon. The Cavs are enjoying very strong TV ratings in NE Ohio, as well as in Western PA (Pittsburgh), Western NY (Buffalo), and of course, here in Columbus/Central Ohio. I don’t see Cavs Owner Dan Gilbert wanting to divy that up between himself and anyone else, anytime soon, even after LeBron James is gone since the Cavs still ranked among the more watched teams, even in his absence. If the NBA were to expand in Ohio, it would probably go back to Cincy first.

    Not to mention that an NBA team here would essentially be competing with Ohio State, the same problem that an NFL team would run into.

    Honestly, of the three major sports leagues not represented here, I think Columbus might have the best chance with MLB. Although the Reds and Indians split Columbus fairly evenly for loyalties, neither have so much of an ingrained presence here that a new MLB franchise couldn’t take root, and Ohio State Baseball doesn’t draw anywhere near the same amount of attention and interest that Basketball and Football do. Promote the Clippers to an MLB team.

    in reply to: Has America 'Jumped the Shark'? – Primaries 2016 #1125898

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>NEOBuckeye wrote:</div>
    I almost felt bad for Kasich. For a moment, and with special emphasis on almost.

    Really, as governor, he’s done more and in so many ways to damage and dampen my hopes and dreams for this state, and for the quality of life for those of us in it, than any other Ohio politician to come along during my lifetime that I can think of. IMHO, it serves him right that he gets to see own lofty dreams and ambitions completely shattered and broken to pieces before his own eyes, and by someone who couldn’t even give a damn that he had them in the first place. The jerk hiding behind the “Mr. Nice Guy” mask got trumped (pun intended) by someone who soundly outclassed and beat him at his own game.

    Ooh, yeah, that’s gotta burn. And it’s going to eat at Kasich for quite a while, I’m sure.

    Yeah Kasich ruined my dreams. He stole all hope for ohios future. literally caused everything bad ever imagined to almost happen. Who would have imagined we would be killing poor people for food and rounding up folks into camps based on race and sexuality when we elected him.

    Let’s keep this in the proper frame. Kasich’s not the beginning or end of all of our problems, but he’s certainly signed off on some pretty big and nasty ones, like fracking and deep injection wells, which surely won’t come back to bite us a few years down the road when the earth shifts and the chemicals we hoped to forget about find their way back up into the water tables… right?

    He’s also pigheadedly and foolishly stood in the way of action on key infrastructure issues, like doing something about Ohio’s tragic lack of a modern passenger rail system. Let’s be real, by the time he leaves office in January 2019, we will all have lost at least a decade of our lives that could have seen genuine progress in terms of connecting Ohio’s major cities with passenger rail.

    Also, for a state with so many large and mid-sized cities and that depends on these cities for its economic health and well-being, he and his administration have gone out of their way to undermine their home rule powers in favor of strengthening the governments of sprawling suburbs and townships, while also supporting a state government more concerned with stopping abortion and making life difficult for gay couples than it is with creating a state where people from all walks of life want to be.

    I don’t think it’s too much for anyone to want to dream of this state being a much better place to live, work, play, and raise a family than what it has become under Kasich and his administration, do you? Cities around the US are thriving, and Ohio’s are trying to keep up with them. Why then do we endorse and support a governor and political party that seem so hell-bent on throwing roadblocks into their path at every turn?

    So yes, I am laughing at the jackass of man who somehow thought he had done such a bang up job here that he felt entitled to spend at least the next 4 years on 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. Ohio and the United States both deserve better leadership. Not that Trump is it, but that’s a different post.

    in reply to: Has America 'Jumped the Shark'? – Primaries 2016 #1125522

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    I almost felt bad for Kasich. For a moment, and with special emphasis on almost.

    Really, as governor, he’s done more and in so many ways to damage and dampen my hopes and dreams for this state, and for the quality of life for those of us in it, than any other Ohio politician to come along during my lifetime that I can think of. IMHO, it serves him right that he gets to see own lofty dreams and ambitions completely shattered and broken to pieces before his own eyes, and by someone who couldn’t even give a damn that he had them in the first place. The jerk hiding behind the “Mr. Nice Guy” mask got trumped (pun intended) by someone who soundly outclassed and beat him at his own game.

    Ooh, yeah, that’s gotta burn. And it’s going to eat at Kasich for quite a while, I’m sure.

    in reply to: The Columbus-Cleveland Rivalry #1121011

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>Madeinohio wrote:</div>
    What’s interesting to me is while some Cleveland and Cincy partisans are dependably snarly in their digs at C’bus, I hear nothing but positives from Pittsburghers.

    Same here. I don’t suppose it should be much surprise, though, that there’s mutual respect among similarly prosperous cities.

    The interesting thing to me is that Pittsburgh seems like a strong counterpoint to Cleveland’s inability to prosper, seeing as how they both hit similar lows within similar timeframes, but only one recovered. What do Pittsburghers tend to think of Cleveland?

    You haven’t spent much time in Cincinnati, which really isn’t doing too bad in its own right these days. But they are still insanely jealous of Columbus, which they feel they should not be competing against as a vastly oversized state capital.

    As I said above, put Pittsburgh in Ohio, and you will see their attitudes toward Columbus change fast when they are competing with us for state tax dollars for municipal operations and economic development.

    in reply to: The Columbus-Cleveland Rivalry #1121010

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    Born and raised in Columbus. Have lived as a resident alien in Pennsylvania (I’ll always be an Ohioan) for more than 25 years.<br>
    What’s interesting to me is while some Cleveland and Cincy partisans are dependably snarly in their digs at C’bus, I hear nothing but positives from Pittsburghers. Many Yinzers I know have friends or family living in Central Ohio and have nothing but good things to say about the city and region.

    That’s because Pittsburgh isn’t in Ohio and so is not competing with Columbus for political attention and tax revenues from state government here. It is much easier for them in this sense to maintain an impartial view towards Columbus.

    If Pittsburgh were located in Ohio, their prevailing attitude toward Columbus would likely be very different, and much similar to Cleveland and Cincy’s attitudes, or else the existing antagonistic attitude they have towards Philadelphia which seems to get the bulk of favors and attention from Pennsylvania state government.

    in reply to: 2015 Columbus Metro and County Population Estimates #1119963

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    I realize as Walker indicated that housing is being constructed, but like you mention, it just does not seem to be on the level that the population growth would suggest. Maybe ‘vacancies’ are being filled as you suggest (particularly after the Great Recession and housing bust) and when that is done the building will have to start increasing…either that or the estimates may be a bit optimistic. Only time will tell. If the info is correct the housing unit construction is going to have to pick up big time at some point-there are only so many vacancies to go around.

    Don’t want to end up with a shortage and see rents start skyrocketing. People online have been complaining about the growth in Austin and how the traffic is now a nightmare and the cost of living is exploding with the rapid growth. There is a down side to such rapid growth if you do not anticipate and adjust for it.

    Rents are already skyrocketing here despite the current construction boom, even for older apartments that don’t have all the bells and whistles of the newer units going up like weeds all over the place. It seems mere proximity to new construction is enough to lead to a rent hike, something I’ve personally experienced. Demand probably does have something to do with it, but it’s not the whole story. Some of it comes down to the complex owners themselves seeing that they can make even more $$$$ on leases through marketing and the brand/image of the city as a trendy place to be.

    Other cost of living components in Columbus/Central Ohio haven’t gone up dramatically (yet) but if things keep pace here, I’m sure it’s only a matter of time.

    Transport-wise, Columbus isn’t ready for 500k more people to move here in the next 20-30 or so years, but probably nothing will be done about it until our roads and highways are truly gridlocked, even on weekends, and then relief will be even further off than what it might have been had we really been interested in planning ahead. It is so maddeningly typical of ‘Murica that we wait until the eleventh hour to finally address what we should have been doing all along.

    in reply to: Has America 'Jumped the Shark'? – Primaries 2016 #1119097

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    Is the site itself the most ideal and reliable of a source? No. But even a broken clock is right twice a day. Even Fox News or MSNBC isn’t completely “wrong” on everything. They just slant much of what they present through one particular political lens or another.

    I didn’t need Gawker myself to arrive at the conclusions I have come to about Kasich being a terrible governor as well as a loser of a presidential candidate. Regardless, it is good to see that not everyone is drinking the Kool-Aid that he is some kind of great dark horse of hope for America and savior to this state when his actual record indicates otherwise, in stark contrast to his PR image and media portrayal as a nice guy. The writer could have just as easily written a fluff piece about him kissing babies, hugging women, etc., claiming him to be “the anti-Trump” or even “the next Reagan”. They didn’t.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 539 total)

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