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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 2,512 total)
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  • in reply to: Chicken Stories #1058641
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    One more chicken story from the memory banks.

    I was sitting on the back porch looking out over the hazy, drowsy fields awhirr with katydids and dusty clouds of tiny little insects. It was a very hot afternoon. I was just sitting there, doing nothing. In front of me was a yew bush someone had planted long ago when the back porch was the front porch, facing old Rte. 50. I’m sure at one time it had been neatly clipped but now it dozed in the sun, frowsy with light green tips, expanded into an amorphous, cloudlike shape. I thought of Thomas Hardy novels and accounts of giant pillars of impenetrable yew trees planted by custom in English graveyards. These yews had been revered as magic trees. And here was one right in front of me, doing as it pleased. I looked off to my side at the giant drooping spiraea bush, barely able to hold the weight of its many clusters of starlike little white waxy flowers. Leggy underneath with deshabille dusty hardpan dirt that the chickens had made little scooped-out dustbaths in, it was clearly long unpruned. All of the sudden my eye swept out over the vast expanse of plant life surrounding me on all sides. Every single one growing rangy, dead in spots and bright green in others, and bursting with jolie laide elegance. The shaggy silver maples with their exuberant crowns and dragging dead branches, with the clothesline hung between. The stately elder hemlock dripping its lacey fairy boughs over the broken cement picnic table and the fence where the goats came by to look at me. The reedy dry prairie grasses of the field dusty with pollen and garish blooms. The wind gently moved all of these one way, and then gently the other. I thought back to all the days I had spent in places like countless tiny apartments in countless towns, most of them identical, all of them white gypsum boxes with aluminum windows, some subdivision houses in tidy cul-de-sacs, and I could see my spirit squeezed into those little boxes like an animal in an experimental facility. Sure I had been alive– I had survived. But my spirit was squeezed, squeezed into a white cube shape, and then again even smaller, so that there was room for furniture and cars and televisions and other people and pretending it was normal. Like a person getting out after a long car ride and stretching their legs, the yew bush told me to stretch out my spirit. “But I have calmed and quieted myself, I am like a weaned child with its mother; like a weaned child I am content.”

    in reply to: Chicken Stories #1054173
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    These are good leads so far. Hello David! And nice to see Twix here with her expertise!

    Yeah we’re not totally set on a by-the-book tiny house, just a small house.

    It’s tough because we do have very limited funding. Might be running into a very small windfall in the next 6 mos., but not nearly enough to just out-and-out buy something.

    I have various issues that functionally amount to a disability. But I do know how to run a good household and take care of things nicely so I’m wondering if there is some way to do a Kickstarter or Go Fund Me for a bed-and-breakfasty type thing. We have a little baby I stay home with and would like to homeschool. We would eventually want to get a few goats, chickens, garden, etc.

    My husband works but our income is not super high. Just don’t want to get caught in the rental trap forever, particularly because we could be landowners that left our land better than when we found it.

    We could join an intentional community but that usually means making no more savings and frankly, dealing with roommate-type-relationships which we would rather not deal with again– we always have to live with other people and that’s enough of that :)

    So basically, just looking for a solution for a complicated situation. Once we could get settled in somewhere I would be so busy working and making things lovely.

    in reply to: Chicken Stories #1053977
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    Thanks guys, keep the suggestions coming!

    in reply to: Chicken Stories #1053958
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    Hey people,

    I haven’t posted in forever but I have a question you civic types at CU may be able to help me with. I know there was a thread about a gentleman who wanted to build a tiny house in the city, but what about in Franklin or Licking County in general? It’s really hard to find building regulation stuff for tiny house building.

    Specifically I’m looking for how small a residence can be, if it is required by law to have water and electric hookup, what building materials are accepted, etc. etc.

    If I were rich I’d just build now and apologize later, but I really don’t have the money to have my house torn down for code violation.

    We are inclined to just buy a little sliver of land near Columbus and try to build a tiny little house. Woodstove, outhouse with septic (I hope), rainwater, etc.

    in reply to: Climate Change #1018797
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    And now, although I am sure the entire CU community is breathlessly awaiting another endless Rus/someone else debate, I will curb my carbon emissions by signing out. I’ll leave you with this amuse bouche:

    https://bookofbadarguments.com/

    in reply to: Climate Change #1018793
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    So you’re saying, technology made it possible to have more people? And that that is what happened? Because that is what happened, I rest my case. Thank you for your assistance.

    in reply to: Climate Change #1018791
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    Correction

    in reply to: Climate Change #1018789
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    So please explain why population has increased exponentially as more technology has been developed and used. Seems to me you are looking at a brief snapshot in time, while climate change deals in geological time.

    Nature will take its course eventually. It is logically improbable that human beings will devise a more efficient system of energy use in a few thousand years, than evolution has devised over millions of years. We co-evolved with this very finite set of living conditions, and we will find it very unpleasant if damn near impossible to live for very long outside those conditions.

    in reply to: Climate Change #1018777
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>Manatee wrote:</div>
    A certain amount of work requires a certain amount of force, at cost to us and the world around us, and there’s no overdraft protection. We can run everything on nuclear energy– with pretty sizable risks– to compress more force out of the world. But how much will ever be enough? Every advantage we gain in making life easier for ourselves only makes it that much easier to reproduce, thereby exacerbating the problem exponentially.

    Yet we see declining birth rates in countries with a lot of these comforts and conveniences, as opposed to less prosperous countries.

    Oops, sorry I need to clarify– technology not only makes reproduction easier, but lengthens life expectancy. Net result is more people at one time, worldwide.

    And more prosperous countries use more resources per capita than less prosperous ones, net result, more resources used even if birth rate is lower.

    in reply to: Are You a Hipster? #1018773
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    in reply to: Climate Change #1018772
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    Well, we don’t like to do physical work, unless its on an elliptical machine or something. Something or someone has to do the work of our sustenance for us, and that job usually falls to exploding carbon-based fuels and/or people in lower economic stations than ourselves.

    A certain amount of work requires a certain amount of force, at cost to us and the world around us, and there’s no overdraft protection. We can run everything on nuclear energy– with pretty sizable risks– to compress more force out of the world. But how much will ever be enough? Every advantage we gain in making life easier for ourselves only makes it that much easier to reproduce, thereby exacerbating the problem exponentially.

    We need to balance the equation– that is, make the amount of work we do closer to equal to the amount of force required to sustain us. That is using our bodies and the world more efficiently, and it is what we evolved to do. At some point if we were to sustain this current lazy mode of living, in order to balance the equation, there would simply need to be fewer people. This would only come about when we had degraded our standard of living– of which the natural world is a vastly underrated provider– to the point where we slow reproduction, and/or some people’s standard of living is reduced to such a degree that they actually perish. Of course this will take a while in human time, and in the meantime we’ll have a lot of nonsense bickering and flaky rhetoric blowing around, just like every other era of human history, except magnified by the internet or whatever new media we generate in an effort to speed up life as much as possible.

    I’m not sure when I turned into Andy Rooney, it was so gradual I didn’t notice.

    in reply to: Climate Change #1018690
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    I think there’s zero chance we’re gonna turn this climate change train around in enough time to save our current standard of living, and I also think things like carbon credits are a crock.

    I hate to sound so cynical but I think we’re just going to have to get used to living on a hotter planet. We should do something about reducing our carbon emissions, but I’m afraid the desire for those changes won’t really gain major traction until the rise in temps endangers the first world’s comforts and conveniences. I already do my part to be as efficient in my energy use as possible.

    I don’t think of it as giving up hope, but merely being realistic. I will miss all the ways the world used to work, but the world will find new ways to work. There are too many people on this planet for me to control what every single one of them does.

    If the human race en masse does not find specific hills, rivers, plants, animals, seas or icebergs as compelling in their own right as I do, there’s not much I can do about it except hopefully provide a good example of what I would consider to be right livelihood.

    in reply to: Are You a Hipster? #1018687
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    I like stuff that’s even further out from the mainstream, so I’m… more hip than a hipster? Or just hopelessly out of touch? Perhaps both.

    in reply to: "This is Cleveland" Branding/Imaging #992151
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    I like what they’re doing here, but… THIS is the Cleveland I remember:

    in reply to: CU Holiday Party – Thur, Dec 19 at Strongwater – Presented by Kemba #554548
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    groundrules said:
    don’t ask for this served tall. ain’t gonna happen.

    “The Gin Sweeney… it’s better than you.”

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 2,512 total)

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