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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 188 total)
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  • in reply to: Artisan Vermouth is a thing now #1121580

    Lu
    Participant

    I’ve been waiting for this. I was always so embarrassed my vermouths didn’t have compelling origin narratives I could share.

    in reply to: Crossroads Project #1120522

    Lu
    Participant

    Columbus should take advantage of the delay in these projects and seriously study the possibility of removing some of the innerbelt freeways. I’d love to see us follow the lead of other cities that have converted their downtown freeways into boulevards and parks. That would do more than anything to improve downtown and the surrounding neighborhoods.

    in reply to: Driverless Cars / Self-Driving Cars #1118521

    Lu
    Participant

    Very exciting to see that Columbus is one of seven finalists in the DOT’s Smart Cities Challenge, and that Columbus’ proposal is to use the funding to develop a driverless car network in Easton.

    As other folks have said on here recently, perhaps the silver lining of Columbus being so late to the game in developing transit options is that we can instead focus our spending on the coming driverless revolution and be at the forefront of the change. Winning this grant would be huge for our city.

    The other finalists are Denver, Portland, Pittsburgh, Kansas City, San Francisco and Austin.

    in reply to: Light Rail in Central Ohio #1117028

    Lu
    Participant

    In some places yes. In the Short North the development is there. A street car is actually needed for mobility there, now.

    Ned, see the NPR story I posted above. Cities are finding that their modern streetcars are performing poorly on travel times (worse than buses). Light rail with dedicated ROW is a different story.

    If streetcars don’t improve transit, and the only benefit is to encourage development, the Short North is the last place in Columbus that needs this.

    in reply to: Hamilton Road and 161 Development #1116808

    Lu
    Participant

    The City of Columbus is not the developer here. It can react to what is being proposed, but can not “lead the charge” when it comes to private development.

    Sure it can. Dublin is doing it. Many cities are successfully using form-based code to set higher standards for new development.

    A great example is Arlington, VA, which has used an optional form-based code to encourage better design. A developer knows in advance exactly what the county wants in new developments. If a proposal meets the requirements in the code (which are transparent and known in advance), the developer is all set and enjoys expedited approvals. Or, it can opt out, submit a proposal the traditional way, and go through all the normal red tape. It has been a huge success.

    in reply to: 5xNW needs to celebrate #1115892

    Lu
    Participant

    According to this 2013 Columbus Business First post, CCS spent more per student than Dublin, Worthington, New Albany, Gahanna, or Hilliard. Of course, it’s not an apples-to-apples comparison because student needs are surely higher in CCS than these suburbs. But equal spending per student doesn’t seem to be the key issue here.

    in reply to: Light Rail in Central Ohio #1115576

    Lu
    Participant

    NPR had a story yesterday about the problems cities have faced rolling out modern streetcars, particularly those that share the road with traffic. It sounds like the problems have been due to slow speeds from not being able to maneuver around traffic, low ridership, and cost overruns.

    It sounds like light rail lines separated from traffic have fared better. BRT has the advantage of being able to maneuver around traffic. Hopefully Columbus will take into account the recent experiences of these other cities.

    http://www.npr.org/2016/02/23/467813006/revived-streetcars-may-be-on-track-for-disappointment

    in reply to: New Del Baggio pizza shop coming to Italian village #1115468

    Lu
    Participant

    pizza and craft beer, pizza and craft beer, pizza and craft beer…. the IV mantra.

    I love my pizza and craft beer as much as the next guy, but I do wonder if the trend is getting a bit bubbly. Kind of like the great FroYo Bubble of 2013. Or the Curves Gym Bubble of 2006. Not complaining though!

    in reply to: Scioto Peninsula Development – News & Updates #1115148

    Lu
    Participant

    A multi-million dollar project to cut COSI open to remove a five minute stroll for park-walkers doesn’t seem like a good use of money IMHO.

    Compared to the cost of burying a parking lot, the cost to reconfigure a lobby may be negligible.

    in reply to: Scioto Peninsula Development – News & Updates #1115142

    Lu
    Participant

    Or… just walk around? It’s not THAT far.

    Are you kidding? The building is a monstrosity. It’s a windowless wall two-blocks long that turns its back on Franklinton and and separates it from the river and downtown.

    A passthrough would mitigate some of the problem by allowing people to pass easily between activity in the new park and activity by the river. Maybe check out a couple of exhibits on the way. :)

    in reply to: Scioto Peninsula Development – News & Updates #1115132

    Lu
    Participant

    I wonder if some sort of public pathway can be created through COSI that would allow people to pass through from the new park to the river. Perhaps reconfigure the lobby and allow people to cut through without paying admission?

    in reply to: Two25 17 Story High Rise Proposed for SE Columbus Commons #1114262

    Lu
    Participant

    IndyGo Redline- why can’t we do it here?

    Taxes. For some reason, our local taxes are already significantly higher than these peer cities. Folks are stretched thin, so there’s little appetite to fund major infrastructure if it means even higher local taxes.

    in reply to: Two25 17 Story High Rise Proposed for SE Columbus Commons #1113251

    Lu
    Participant

    I’m not sure comparing European cities to Columbus is really all that fair. First of all, most of those low-rise buildings tend to be historic in nature and built in a way that very, very few sections of Columbus are now

    Then take a look at DC, which has a wonderful downtown full of mostly modern mid-rise buildings. This isn’t by accident: DC requires all new downtown buildings to have uniform setbacks from the streets and uniform heights, which creates a “street wall” that helps to frame and activate the sidewalk. DC also has strict minimum requirements for street-level retail and for sidewalk amenities.

    All of this gives downtown DC the feel of a European city, but with relatively modern buildings. It works extremely well.

    in reply to: Two25 17 Story High Rise Proposed for SE Columbus Commons #1113249

    Lu
    Participant

    As a city we should be measuring ourselves based on the vibrancy of our streets and the urban design at street level, not an ‘edifice complex’ that says if we’re not building a 20 story building we’re failing. Most of the tall buildings we currently have are detrimental to the vitality of Downtown, not additive due to poor urban design.

    This, exactly. Some of the best, most enjoyable cities in the world have shorter buildings downtown. The vibrant street life of Paris and DC is, if anything, helped by block after block of uniformly mid-rise buildings with plenty of storefronts, lots of sun, visible skies, and fresh air.

    I’d hate for us to end up like Charlotte’s downtown, which has dozens of skyscrapers surrounded by parking lots, and has the depressing feel of an enormous office park.

    in reply to: Light Rail in Central Ohio #1113035

    Lu
    Participant

    The Detroit Auto Show last month was dominated by driverless news. The White House pledged $4b in driverless R&D. Toyota pledged $1b. Michigan is building a fake downtown to test driverless in urban environments. Ford is testing their autonomous cars in the snow. Alphabet made its driverless division a primary subsidiary (on par with Google). GM invested in Lyft. Elon Musk announced that new Teslas will be fully driverless as soon as 2018.

    This is moving faster than anyone predicted and is hardly a far-off utopian fantasy.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 188 total)

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