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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 54 total)
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  • in reply to: WalMart is “Going Urban” with New Stores #385033

    Klablut
    Member

    In 2003, Californian suburb Contra Costa County managed to overturn proposals for a new Wal-Mart supercenter. Part of the evidence that went towards this decision was a study done by the San Diego County Taxpayers Association, ‘a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization.’ It found that an influx of such stores would cause an annual decline in wages and benefits between $105 million and $221 million, and an increase of $9 million in public health costs. As so few Wal-Mart workers are covered by health insurance, the taxpayer ends up paying for the health of its workers – and stacking shelves and smiling mechanically all day can’t be too good for your health. In the words of Ruth Rosen of the San Francisco Chronicle, ‘We, the customers, get such low prices and convenient shopping because we, the taxpayers, subsidize Wal-Mart profits by paying for county public health services, food stamps and social services for its retired employees.'[5]

    in reply to: WalMart is “Going Urban” with New Stores #385031

    Klablut
    Member

    Ohio Subsidizes Walmart with Approximately $68.5 million Each Year
    The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services released a report on Sept. 9, 2009 ranking major employers by their employees’ reliance upon various state run programs like Medicaid and food stamps. With health care reform on the front burner of the American political agenda, this is obviously a pretty important report. It shows that large companies are shirking their responsibilities and forcing tax payers to subsidize them, and guess who was at the top of the list in Ohio.

    Walmart has more than 15,000 employees and their dependents in Ohio on Medicaid, costing state taxpayers $68 million a year. Walmart has higher Medicaid and food stamp numbers than any other company on the report.

    Walmart is attempting to convince the American people that their company is a positive force when it comes to health care. They’ve run ads, started programs, attempted to open health clinics in their stores, and more. But stories like this throw Walmart’s credibility in to question. Yet, In spite of astronomical profits, Walmart fails to cover nearly 700,000 of its employees and offers plans too costly for its average employees to afford.

    Walmart claims that only 2.6% of its employees use Medicaid. Yet, in Ohio, the number appears to be much higher.

    in reply to: WalMart is “Going Urban” with New Stores #385030

    Klablut
    Member

    Snarf wrote >>

    Klablut wrote >>

    Twixlen wrote >>
    I “get” what both sides of this arguement are saying…. because I’ve felt both things. I mean, if someone is willing and able to sell something at a cheaper price than other folks in town with the same items, why on earth wouldn’t I take advantage of that? That’s the free market. Also, why do I care what WalMart does or doesn’t carry – what their own corporate culture deems as vulgar or appropriate – since I can find whatever I want in other stores or on the internet?
    And yet, I have a problem with it. I remember when WalMart came to the nearest town when I was a kid – how excited we were. It was a tiny store by today’s standards (this is mid/late 1970’s), and it was a big deal to get hired by WalMart. They had tough standards for their employees, and rewarded them in kind. It was a store that had brought many different stores under one roof – but it wasn’t necessarily cheaper. It was just a convenience thing.
    Compare that to modern WalMart. Now, stores are deliberately built within miles of one another to drive out local competition. Once that competition is gone, one store is usually the clear favorite, and the other store is mothballed – to sit empty, since WalMart will not sell their former stores to anyone deemed competition. In some cases, these stores have gotten so blighted, they’ve ended up being torn down with taxpayer money. We’ve seen this happen here in town (not necessarily the taxpayer tear-down, but the empty space) – I know I’ve seen it happen in other towns.
    WalMart DOES censor – they’ve admitted to that censorship, in the guise of creating a more “family friendly” environment. It makes me uncomfortable when a corporation wants to be my parent, or to parent. Because they are so very huge, record labels, magazines, books and such have either changed their cover/content entirely, or create a separate “WalMart” version. So, in all those small towns, where WalMart has driven out competition, and the vast majority of folks do all their shopping there – do they realize their choices are limited? Pema Chodron has some of the bestselling religion/spirituality books on Amazon – has anyone ever seen one of her books in a WalMart, the largest box store in the world? I’ve never seen a book there on anything but conventional Christianity, or generally very conservative values. And yup, it’s WalMart’s choice to limit selection in any way they please, but it makes me very uncomfortable to have them make those kinds of choices. Especially considering that they deliberately limit the choices of shopping locations in smaller towns.
    It’s taking me too long to articulate this – I’m sure ya’ll’ve moved on to discussing why it is so many folks feel like pajama bottoms and slippers are acceptible attire in some stores, blah blah blah.
    For me, there are problems with WalMart – they’ve had class action problems with how they’ve treated women in the workplace (deliberately limiting advancement, less pay, etc), they play games with hours of employees to keep them from qualifying for insurance (this was NY, not sure of OH rules), they censor (remember the Brokeback Mountain debacle?)… and when they are the largest private employer, the largest retailer, they ARE making choices for people.

    Thank you. There are a ton of issues with this company. Some just want to turn a blind eye because of the savings. It’s quite sad actually.

    And you, martyr of spending, are so SO much better than those people.

    I don’t think so but thanks for voting. Some people just don’t have much choice in the matter.

    Walmart’s increasing drive for profits and moving into other product markets caused huge food and business ‘deserts’ in the USA – especially in small towns. Arrivals of Wal-Mart stores are particularly scary because when local business is completely smashed and profits come down (when the incomes of local communities are lowered by the decline of competitive business) the company immediately removes its store to the nearest bigger town. Most of these cases involve removing stores from a couple of smaller towns to one bigger one, hence the name ‘strategy of consolidation’. Local business cannot come back to life immediately, so people in the smaller towns are still dependent on Wal-Mart and therefore have to cover much longer distances for their shopping trips. The process thus creates more traffic as well as social dislocation.

    While others may feel that they have to shop at WM due to budget constraints.

    The battle against Wal-Mart in U.S. is about maintaining quality community living standards. The true legacy of Wal-Mart isn’t lower prices. The true legacy of Wal-Mart is lower living standards for hard working Americans and those overseas. The fact is for every Wal-Mart store that opens, jobs are lost to the community, the tax base shrinks, the number of workers with health benefits declines, and the number of workers eligible for welfare increases.

    From a study conducted by Consumer Reports: surveyed 30,666 of its readers over a year’s time, asking them to rank experiences and products at 11 retailers, including Wal-Mart. Consumer Reports issued this brief disclaimer: “Results might not reflect experiences of the U.S. population.”
    Wal-Mart will not be reprinting the Consumer Report survey on its website. The results are not very flattering—and they’re not very different from a similar survey the magazine published eight years ago.

    For openers: “Last year shoppers spent $405 billion at Wal-Mart, the world’s largest retailer. But according to a new study by the Consumer Reports National Research Center, they might be better off if they switch stores.”

    Consumers shop at Wal-Mart for one reason only: presumed low prices. But CR readers said prices at the 10 other retailers (which included JCPenney, Sears, and Target) were “at least as good.”
    Almost 75% of Wal-Mart shoppers found at least one problem to complain about, and half had two or more complaints. In terms of overall store rating, Wal-Mart finished 10th out of 11 stores, barely nosing out Kmart at dead last.

    “Wal-Mart was near the bottom of the Ratings,” CR concludes. “The number of complaints about Wal-Mart’s lines and narrow aisles was above average. About 44% of its shoppers had a problem with the staff if they sought help. Quality of apparel, jewelry, kitchenware, and electronics was rated below average.”

    in reply to: WalMart is “Going Urban” with New Stores #385024

    Klablut
    Member

    Twixlen wrote >>
    I “get” what both sides of this arguement are saying…. because I’ve felt both things. I mean, if someone is willing and able to sell something at a cheaper price than other folks in town with the same items, why on earth wouldn’t I take advantage of that? That’s the free market. Also, why do I care what WalMart does or doesn’t carry – what their own corporate culture deems as vulgar or appropriate – since I can find whatever I want in other stores or on the internet?
    And yet, I have a problem with it. I remember when WalMart came to the nearest town when I was a kid – how excited we were. It was a tiny store by today’s standards (this is mid/late 1970’s), and it was a big deal to get hired by WalMart. They had tough standards for their employees, and rewarded them in kind. It was a store that had brought many different stores under one roof – but it wasn’t necessarily cheaper. It was just a convenience thing.
    Compare that to modern WalMart. Now, stores are deliberately built within miles of one another to drive out local competition. Once that competition is gone, one store is usually the clear favorite, and the other store is mothballed – to sit empty, since WalMart will not sell their former stores to anyone deemed competition. In some cases, these stores have gotten so blighted, they’ve ended up being torn down with taxpayer money. We’ve seen this happen here in town (not necessarily the taxpayer tear-down, but the empty space) – I know I’ve seen it happen in other towns.
    WalMart DOES censor – they’ve admitted to that censorship, in the guise of creating a more “family friendly” environment. It makes me uncomfortable when a corporation wants to be my parent, or to parent. Because they are so very huge, record labels, magazines, books and such have either changed their cover/content entirely, or create a separate “WalMart” version. So, in all those small towns, where WalMart has driven out competition, and the vast majority of folks do all their shopping there – do they realize their choices are limited? Pema Chodron has some of the bestselling religion/spirituality books on Amazon – has anyone ever seen one of her books in a WalMart, the largest box store in the world? I’ve never seen a book there on anything but conventional Christianity, or generally very conservative values. And yup, it’s WalMart’s choice to limit selection in any way they please, but it makes me very uncomfortable to have them make those kinds of choices. Especially considering that they deliberately limit the choices of shopping locations in smaller towns.
    It’s taking me too long to articulate this – I’m sure ya’ll’ve moved on to discussing why it is so many folks feel like pajama bottoms and slippers are acceptible attire in some stores, blah blah blah.
    For me, there are problems with WalMart – they’ve had class action problems with how they’ve treated women in the workplace (deliberately limiting advancement, less pay, etc), they play games with hours of employees to keep them from qualifying for insurance (this was NY, not sure of OH rules), they censor (remember the Brokeback Mountain debacle?)… and when they are the largest private employer, the largest retailer, they ARE making choices for people.

    Thank you. There are a ton of issues with this company. Some just want to turn a blind eye because of the savings. It’s quite sad actually.

    in reply to: WalMart is “Going Urban” with New Stores #384971

    Klablut
    Member

    Core_Models wrote >>

    Klablut wrote >>

    Walker wrote >>
    Can we get this back on topic? The cheap personal potshots aren’t really adding anything of value here.

    But it does tell me a whole lot about the mindset of WalMart’s shoppers. Shiny cheap things = good. Censorship of books and music, environmental and human rights abuses, who cares? As long as I can save a penny.

    So by “censorship” you mean choosing what you sell in your own store…
    By “shiny cheap things” you mean stuff you don’t want to buy, but clearly someone else does…
    and by “human rights abuses” you mean paying the federally mandated minimum wage to a million unskilled Americans and giving a bunch of them health insurance too…
    got it…thanks.
    ETA: btw, a quick C/U search tells me you’re a homeowner in Grandview enjoying crepes for breakfast…WTF do you know about the people who are looking to pinch a penny?

    Wow. Really? Personal attacks? lol Thanks for the laugh. So I can’t take issue with the worlds largest retailer’s politics because in God knows how many years – I downed a crepe at the North Market? This makes it much too easy. Hope that there was a roll back on boxed wine at Wally World for one to come up w/ that logic. I can only imagine what the richest Americans consume, four out of the top ten happen to be named Walton.

    But alas this is not about you as much as you would like it to be but aboutthis corp. I am interested in hearing about Walker’s take. Most things that I read and hear about WalMart, besides the low pricing, is so much that I despise about a Southern corp. that heavily favors donations to the Rpubs. Were there prayer meetings/circles at your work place? How were employees treated and what were the benefits like? I guess that this job was something you held while young and not a career move raising X amount of children and having to provide health benefits?

    in reply to: WalMart is “Going Urban” with New Stores #384962

    Klablut
    Member

    Walker wrote >>
    Can we get this back on topic? The cheap personal potshots aren’t really adding anything of value here.

    But it does tell me a whole lot about the mindset of WalMart’s shoppers. Shiny cheap things = good. Censorship of books and music, environmental and human rights abuses, who cares? As long as I can save a penny.

    in reply to: WalMart is “Going Urban” with New Stores #384955

    Klablut
    Member

    Core_Models wrote >>

    Klablut wrote >>

    Core_Models wrote >>

    Klablut wrote >>
    Walmart costs American jobs and gives us crappy Chinese goods.
    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/walmart/view/

    Again…you’re talking government policy as much as anything. You do realize that companies are still tax incentived to move their production out of the US? Companies aren’t moving production jobs out of the US so they can sell their stuff at rock bottom Walmart prices, that association is not worthy of a show like Frontline. As far as those American jobs, they also provide over 1 million of them. Here. In the US.
    BTW, a bit more of note on your RCA plant in Circleville featured there…
    They made glass tubes for TVs…glass…tubes. You bought a TV with a glass tube in it recently?
    I’m sure the people worried about getting cancer from that site aren’t that worried about the job loss…
    http://www.epa.ohio.gov/cdo/rca.aspx

    Oh yes – cancer rates. Sure have not heard about any cheap products coming from China resulting in cancer recently.
    http://www.unmadeinchina.org/contStd.asp?lang=en&idPag=33
    http://fortheloveofthedogblog.com/news-updates/walmart-selling-toxic-china-made-pet-toys
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2010/jun/07/china-cancer-villages-industrial-pollution

    Wal-Mart also killed JFK.

    When you can’t argue the facts, be snarky. The kids on cu love it!

    in reply to: WalMart is “Going Urban” with New Stores #384953

    Klablut
    Member

    catnfiddle wrote >>
    This is silly. Right now there isn’t anything downtown that is accessible and affordable. If this is how Columbus could get urban groceries and toiletries, so be it. The way this town works, it could also spur some of the local people to organize and create something ma and pa to counter it. Hey, if THAT is what finally works, great. Just get something in place to service those who live or who want to live there.
    I know I’ll probably get ripped to pieces by someone for saying this.

    Kroger in the Brewery District is both accessible and affordable.

    in reply to: WalMart is “Going Urban” with New Stores #384950

    Klablut
    Member

    Ohhh cheap shiny things! I guess that clears it up.

    in reply to: WalMart is “Going Urban” with New Stores #384928

    Klablut
    Member

    Core_Models wrote >>

    Klablut wrote >>
    Walmart costs American jobs and gives us crappy Chinese goods.
    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/walmart/view/

    Again…you’re talking government policy as much as anything. You do realize that companies are still tax incentived to move their production out of the US? Companies aren’t moving production jobs out of the US so they can sell their stuff at rock bottom Walmart prices, that association is not worthy of a show like Frontline. As far as those American jobs, they also provide over 1 million of them. Here. In the US.
    BTW, a bit more of note on your RCA plant in Circleville featured there…
    They made glass tubes for TVs…glass…tubes. You bought a TV with a glass tube in it recently?
    I’m sure the people worried about getting cancer from that site aren’t that worried about the job loss…
    http://www.epa.ohio.gov/cdo/rca.aspx

    Oh yes – cancer rates. Sure have not heard about any cheap products coming from China resulting in cancer recently.

    http://www.unmadeinchina.org/contStd.asp?lang=en&idPag=33

    Walmart Selling ‘Toxic’ China Made Pet Toys

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2010/jun/07/china-cancer-villages-industrial-pollution

    in reply to: WalMart is “Going Urban” with New Stores #384920

    Klablut
    Member

    With close to two million employees worldwide, Wal-Mart has faced a torrent of lawsuits and issues with regards to its workforce. These issues involve low wages, poor working conditions, inadequate health care, as well as issues involving the company’s strong anti-union policies. Critics point to Wal-Mart’s high turnover rate as evidence of an unhappy workforce, although other factors may be involved. Approximately 70% of its employees leave within the first year.

    in reply to: WalMart is “Going Urban” with New Stores #384918

    Klablut
    Member

    Walmart costs American jobs and gives us crappy Chinese goods.

    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/walmart/view/

    in reply to: BP Protest Thursday, June 17th 2010 #378977

    Klablut
    Member

    lifeontwowheels wrote >>

    I’ll take my chances at another station that may or may not funnel profits to BP.

    So basically you are going to continue with an activity that makes off shore drilling necessary?
    The better protest would be to start using a bike, bus, walking or carpooling more and get others to join in the effort. Show some conviction behind your principles, thats why the bus boycotts, the salt march, the sit ins et al. worked so effectively. “I’m going to boycott BP and hit the Shell up down the street to top off the tank after” really doesn’t carry a lot of weight.

    It makes more sense than – F-it – I’m going to support BP one way or the other – so let me just buy gas at BP anyhow and save a penny a gallon that everyone else on here seems to support. Nevermind that BP has hired a posse of top public relations cronies to send out press releases such as “don’t hurt the poor little man” to try and save their fast sinking ship.

    in reply to: BP Protest Thursday, June 17th 2010 #378974

    Klablut
    Member

    Talcott wrote >>
    I feel like something is getting lost here when the argument becomes about protesting in the abstract. There are a lot of different kinds of protests, and they are not all created equal.
    Protests can still be effective, as part of a larger strategy. They can draw attention to an issue that is being under represented (or not at all represented), and they can being together people who share a common cause in a hybrid of solidarity and social justice networking. That’s how the best protests have functioned historically, but I don’t see how this specific protest would help.
    The problem in this case is that everyone knows about the spill, and everyone is angry at BP. If the oil spill was happening in another country, and wasn’t being reported in the US media, then I think there could be a good argument made for the protest. I still don’t think protesting an individual station would be that great of a plan (and I don’t understand why this station has been picked twice), but that could be reason for a [well planed] demonstration. But that’s not the case here. I can understand this demonstration as a reflection of anger toward BP, but there doesn’t seem to be much beyond that.
    And I do agree that “go help clean up the gulf” is a flip and perhaps impractical response, but in this case, writing representatives, writing checks, canvasing neighborhoods with a petition to encourage clean energy innovation, even writing essays and articles, are more effective directions to work in than a narrowly-focused but ill-defined protest.

    Thank you. That was a very well written response. The only problem I have is that not everyone knows about alternative energy solutions and what they can do in terms of turning their angst into something productive. Most protests that I have encountered usually have information to give out to those who will take it; names and addresses of people/companies/politicians to contact or information on the reason behind the protest. That is how these protests can be effective. You can assume that everyone is educated on these matters but that is simply not true. I don’t consider this a protest againt a particular station but an opportunity to spread the word so to speak. I know that there are other ways to do this, such as canvassing. But a protest would most likely bring in the media. It is a controversial decision to protest at a particular station, I understand. My way of protesting is by not purchasing gas at BP. I’ll take my chances at another station that may or may not funnel profits to BP.

    in reply to: BP Protest Thursday, June 17th 2010 #378969

    Klablut
    Member

    And the protesting thing, yeah, it’s now 2010 and nobody cares about protesting anymore. PLUS, the civil rights movement was a lot more than protests and it had A LOT more people behind it AND the end game had actual results desired, not just letting BP know how mad we are at them. Your comparison if a fail.

    Well I am glad that you speak for everyone and know what year it is. There are wanted results with this protest too:

    petition to get support for clean energy initiatives in Ohio and nationwide.

    I am not saying that targeting one station is the best solution but sitting behind a compt. yacking about it is not either.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 54 total)

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