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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 93 total)
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  • in reply to: Short North Tax Abatements #1126715

    honestlyinsincere
    Participant

    Not a very attractive side of the Mayor: “Andrew Ginther: You’re opinion is that it has not, and that it has not worked and the Short North has been an abject failure. And that’s wrong.”

    in reply to: Sidewalks for third ave? #1106863

    honestlyinsincere
    Participant

    Thanks for posting! I may be missing it, but is there a bike lane or off-road multi-use path?

    Also, what’s with the separated intersection with curved ramps to enter Rail Street? As a pedestrian I feel this is auto-centric design that encourage drivers to go faster when taking the turn. Why can’t an intersection just be an intersection? Nearly 90 degree turns force cars to slow down when turning and be more aware of pedestrians.

    in reply to: Bike Lanes on Summit and Fourth #1105637

    honestlyinsincere
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>jOHnH wrote:</div>
    If you don’t like the new traffic flow on 4th and Summit, take 71 or 315. This wasn’t just done for cyclist, it was a traffic calming project, which in my opinion has help with speeding and safety for all involved. That would include people on bikes, people walking, people trying to cross the street and dare I say, people driving a car!

    +1

    These changes are a right-sizing of the road infrastructure. For far too long, Columbus planners have built roads with rush hour in mind, even though it only makes up less than 15% of the hours in a normal week. That kind of planning creates infrastructure that is over-accommodating and wasteful the other 85% of the hours of the day. Roads should be built to handle traffic averages, not traffic extremes. This is one of the reasons Downtown was turned into a ghost town in the late 20th century. Too much emphasis was placed upon getting people in and out quickly, and the priorities of creating a better 24/7 environment were compromised.

    Ultimately, the changes to Summit & Fourth are a better fit for the area on more of a 24/7 basis.

    One small comment on “Columbus planners have built roads…” The Department of Public Service is actually in charge of the design and construction of roads, not the Planning Department. The Dept. of Public Service just recently hired their first planner—the staff is composed of engineers.

    in reply to: Bike Lanes on Summit and Fourth #1105494

    honestlyinsincere
    Participant

    We live and work in a city with no suitable form of transportation besides a road. How does a bus move you from a congested road, oh yea it doesn’t. These are useless, plus I barely even see the bikers like i did 4 years ago, its a fad that is finally dying. Played out like kwame and them polka dots.

    I work out at Polaris though so this never affects me, I just feel for the drivers, and the bicyclists actually because this will not end well for them. Horrible implementation.

    A question/statement like “How does a bus move you from a congested road, oh yea it doesn’t” really demonstrates your lack of understanding of urban issues and transportation. Just keep complaining about how hard driving a car in Columbus, Ohio is.

    in reply to: Bike Lanes on Summit and Fourth #1105470

    honestlyinsincere
    Participant

    If traffic makes drivers anxious, they should find another mode of travel.

    If you “totally understand that bikes have the right to use whatever lane they want,” then you’ve answered your question. The cyclist who was in the roadway was exercising the right that you acknowledge. During rush hour, a cyclist would be foolish, IMO, to use the roadway lane rather than the protected bike lane north of 11th Avenue due to the likely slower travel speed in the roadway. The bike lane would be a much faster option. And a cyclist in one of the lanes doesn’t “result in one less lane for cars,” as you’ve alleged. Just like other slow moving vehicles, parked vehicles, turning vehicles, etc., the cars have to go around that cyclist. This doesn’t mean the same thing as reducing the lanes from two down to one.

    If a cyclist using a lane they have a right to doesn’t seem “fair to those of us who have to drive,” then I suggest you consider how fair the built environment around Central Ohio is to those who choose not to or cannot drive.

    in reply to: Recreate German Village Design? #1105015

    honestlyinsincere
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>heresthecasey wrote:</div>
    There’s actually a newer subdivision up in Avon Lake near Cleveland that is based on German Village.

    Street are named Schiller, Kossuth, Jaeger, Hanford, Brust, etc; houses are styled like GV cottages; and everything’s spaced closer together than typical suburban design.

    Bizarre. Isn’t the entire point of a suburban subdivision the enormous plots of land? Why wouldn’t someone who wants this just move into the city?

    Lots of people are afraid of cities, whether consciously or subconsciously. This, to some, would be the best of both worlds–like the New Urbanism. They can have quaint homes on small lots in a more rural setting where they have a stronger perception of safety and less economic diversity.

    in reply to: Recreate German Village Design? #1104689

    honestlyinsincere
    Participant

    Wow, thanks so much for that Google Map link! What an interesting exercise in architectural mimicry. I wonder if the folks at GVS know about this?

    in reply to: Bike Lanes on Summit and Fourth #1100750

    honestlyinsincere
    Participant

    I don’t think the lane is a big F-U at all, but I think the cyclists that don’t use it on that stretch are (even if it is legal, which it shouldn’t be).

    I know that most here will think I’m crazy, but I think that cyclists that ride on the road should be required to go through training and be licensed just like drivers are. I also think that learning about driving with cyclists should be a part of driver training. Far too many cyclists ignore traffic laws in a way that is comically dangerous and far too many drivers use this as an excuse to treat cyclists like shit and drive dangerously around them. It’s just a shitty mix, and it’s mostly a matter of poor attitudes on both side.

    It’s not a crazy idea, but it would require a lot of effort. Motorists need to be licensed because they’re driving machines that kill tens of thousands of people every year. Cyclists rarely kill pedestrians or motorists–they are vulnerable and generally only putting themselves at risk, not others. Requiring cyclists to have a license will greatly discourage a carbon-free, efficient, and low-cost means of transport and leisure. It would also likely have a disproportionate impact on low-income people, especially people of color. Of course cyclist education is critical, as is driver education. The motor vehicle test should be much more stringent and include more content about multi-modal transit situations. There should also be more frequent testing, perhaps every four to five years.

    I’d like to see a study that shows cyclists break laws at a higher rate than motorists. I’m a daily pedestrian and see dozens of infractions by drivers on my 15 minute walk in the University District. The behavior of cyclists is held to a different standard by the dominant transportation mode. Illegal driving behaviors are written off as exceptions, while illegal cycling behaviors are taken as the rule. The context of the power dynamic is also critical. Again, cyclists don’t kill people, drivers kill people. We have to realize that the more powerful actor has a responsibility not to injure or kill other road users. Of course cyclists should obey the law. But realize that they’re putting themselves at more risk than when drivers break laws.

    in reply to: Bike Lanes on Summit and Fourth #1100679

    honestlyinsincere
    Participant

    Josh T, because some people are trying to get from point A to point B without taking the scenic route. Just because you don’t feel comfortable riding on certain roads doesn’t mean others shouldn’t. Consider a trip from Hudson and Summit to Fox in the Snow in IV. Why shouldn’t a cyclist take Summit? The route is much faster considering the spacing of traffic lights. Why should someone spend 25 minutes taking High Street when they can spend 10 on Summit Street?

    in reply to: Bike Lanes on Summit and Fourth #1100536

    honestlyinsincere
    Participant

    Although most of the bike lane on Summit is painted, there is still debris and orange barrels in the lane, and the queue boxes have yet to be installed. Even when the bike lane is open, cyclists will still have the 100% legal option of occupying an entire lane of traffic on Summit. City streets are not the exclusive domain of personal automobiles.

    in reply to: Columbus Development Map #1099071

    honestlyinsincere
    Participant

    Hi! I work at a research center at OSU that has an ongoing development map: http://go.osu.edu/development

    Let me know your thoughts and suggestions! My ultimate goal is to get to this point: http://devmap.io/cities

    If any programmers/designers want to volunteer, please let me know!

    in reply to: Redevelopment of Barrett School Building in Merion Village #1098856

    honestlyinsincere
    Participant

    The Dispatch article from 10/20/15 doesn’t say that the Barrett Middle School site will be affordable:

    “Fourteen groups will be outlining their commitments. Among the strategies:

    -Developing 250 affordable rental units for low-income households.
    -Building 30 new houses through Habitat for Humanity-MidOhio.
    -Developing 106 apartments and 22 townhomes at the Barrett Middle School site in Merion Village through Homeport, a nonprofit development company, and Casto, a for-profit company.
    -Completing 40 home rehabilitations, including duplexes, in the Hungarian Village and Reeb-Hosack neighborhoods.”

    Article link: http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2015/10/19/South-Side-initiative-aims-to-create-affordable-housing.html

    in reply to: 12-story, 170-room Hilton Garden Inn Proposed Downtown #1098297

    honestlyinsincere
    Participant

    I’m disappointed by the commission’s attitude toward enforcing the design standards. Just like with the new Hilton, our governance structure fails to enforce consistent sidewalks and no skywalks. Why do we even have these standards if developers get a variance? Why should a hotel get a curb cut? They can’t find a way to operate without one? There must be literally thousands of hotels around the globe that operate perfectly fine without cutting into a downtown sidewalk and creating a hazardous situation for pedestrians. Did they seriously threaten to pull the plug on the project without a curb cut??

    in reply to: The Value of Urban Street Trees #1097512

    honestlyinsincere
    Participant

    Wow! Thanks for the update–that’s too bad. I suppose the upside is that they’re very busy planting trees! If you happen to live in Weinland Park, you might be able to get something sooner with the opening of the tree nursery there.

    in reply to: The Return of White Populations to US Cities #1096769

    honestlyinsincere
    Participant

    Are you saying that people shouldn’t call in housing code violations? Does living in a neighborhood for a couple of decades offer exemption from city ordinances?

    The whole idea of a neighborhood belonging to a certain group of people is utterly ludicrous. Isn’t the progressive ideal to support integration? You can’t have integration without people of different income levels living nearby.

    As Walker asked, what’s the solution? Well, if we could muster up the political support for affordable housing mandates, that would be a start. Mixed-income housing should be a goal for every neighborhood in the city, and every city in the metro region. It would also be worthwhile to consider the voluntary nature of Section 8 housing subsidies to address economic segregation. There are also some innovative affordable housing models like land trusts and conservation districts that our non-profit, corporate, and civic leaders should be discussing.

    The talk of neighborhood intruders, however, is not advancing these solutions. It only further divides us.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 93 total)

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