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Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 373 total)
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  • in reply to: Weinland Park Redevelopment – News & Updates #1086703

    goldenidea
    Participant

    A newly built 2 bedroom home in Grant Park, with 2-1/2 baths and a 2 car garage starts at $246,699. I consider that an incredible deal for new construction. New construction is energy efficient, and no worries about the furnace dropping dead next year, or the roof leaking the year after.

    +1 …Great location too: less than 5 minute walk to the emerging 4th St corridor and less than a 10 minute walk to prime stretch of Short North High Street, with places like Bros Drake & The Table along the way, and more retail coming fairly soon at Summit & Fifth.

    in reply to: Short North White Castle Site to Be Mixed-Use Development #1085344

    goldenidea
    Participant

    Awhile back, I spoke with one of the long-time W.2nd Ave homeowners, located not far from High St. Concern seemed to center around the size/height of the building (up to 11 stories, right?) dwarfing nearby homes and the fact that the new White Castle drive thru would be accessed via 2nd Ave rather than via High St., as it presently is. They feel this new/relocated drive thru access will very likely increase traffic, noise, possibly litter, etc along W.2nd Ave., which is probably true. Keep in mind that the WC drive thru stays active until early morning hours.

    in reply to: Jeni's recall #1080548

    goldenidea
    Participant

    I disagree with last comment above. Like any business, Jeni’s has the right to price their product as they choose. We, in turn, have the right to pay for it, or not. It’s a free market. Have they overpriced their products? That’s a matter of personal opinion and taste. Obviously, many don’t think so. Many people are willing to pay for higher quality & variety.

    As for this now reoccurring Listeria problem. When you consider that Jeni’s is based on and driven by a very high level of creativity… “outside the box” creativity… and given they produce such a wide variety of flavors drawing from very many ingredients, coming from a wide variety of sources, perhaps that contributes to this issue? Also, ever-increasing popularity and growth begets increasing production runs, making it ever more difficult to make it all run right. It’s a shame they are facing these challenges. If they only produced plain vanilla, chocolate & strawberry, perhaps less likely to be like this? But they wouldn’t be Jeni’s if that’s what they did.

    in reply to: BrewDog US Expansion #1080261

    goldenidea
    Participant

    oops, wrong use of quote marks above ^ :)

    in reply to: BrewDog US Expansion #1080260

    goldenidea
    Participant

    I’m just a bit disappointed because if you’re gonna tweet about how “Columbus Fucking Rocks” and tell everyone all the great places you’ve been to that supposedly helped sell you and then locate your facility in a different city away from all of that, it just feels like a bit of a let down.

    Yeah, from our micro-viewpoint… inside looking out… it’s too bad they didn’t choose a location close to and within the center of Columbus but hey, this guy’s viewpoint is from OVERSEAS, he’s speaking from friggin’ Scotland, so not too surprising that he generalized. Also, he probably didn’t want to & couldn’t be any more specific. He was extremely complementary!

    I bet more than half of the employees they hire end up living in Old Town, Marion Village, GV & Short North… if they don’t live in these neighborhoods already. I bet some employees eventually go on to open their own great local craft breweries, many within the city. I bet Brewdog makes major positive contributions to our (that’s Columbus’) craft brew image & scene as viewed nationwide and even internationally. I bet they are major sponsors to our various craftbrew festivals, sports and cultural events, and may even create new events of their own IN THE CITY. Toooo bad they didn’t choose my favorite/our favorite urban location(s), but big-picture-wise, THEY ARE COMING HERE! THIS IS GREAT NEWS!!!

    It’s not like we don’t already have plenty of great places to drink great local beer within the city already. You also have to assume they’ll open a retail location within the city too.

    Finally, as for visiting any brewpub/restaurant they build “out” at their brewery location, down the road or bike path from Columbus, it will be a *whole lot easier* to get to than Stone’s will ever be!

    in reply to: BrewDog US Expansion #1079981

    goldenidea
    Participant

    Perhaps this has already been discussed, but I wonder if there’s a 42 acre site anywhere in Columbus City… perhaps near the airport? Timken & Grandview are both near rail lines, but the entire Timken site is only about 40 acres (approximating) and I believe Grandview is smaller. A significant part of Timken is going to Rogue. It would be nice to see it sited within the city limits, but any local metro site sure beats seeing it go somewhere outside of Ohio.

    in reply to: Natural Gas Drilling / Fracking in Ohio #1079938

    goldenidea
    Participant

    EPA Study of Fracking Finds ‘No Widespread, Systemic’ Pollution
    by Mark DrajemJim Snyder
    June 4, 2015 — 12:19 PM EDT Updated on June 4, 2015 — 2:34 PM EDT

    Hydraulic fracturing has contaminated some drinking water sources but the damage is not widespread, according to a landmark U.S. study of water pollution risks that has supporters of the drilling method declaring victory and foes saying it revealed reason for concern.
    The draft analysis by the Environmental Protection Agency, released Thursday after three years of study, looked at possible ways fracking could contaminate drinking water, from spills of fracking fluids to wastewater disposal.
    “We conclude there are above and below ground mechanisms by which hydraulic fracturing activities have the potential to impact drinking water resources,” the EPA said in the report. But, “we did not find evidence that these mechanisms have led to widespread, systemic impacts on drinking water resources.”
    The study was commissioned by Congress and represents the most comprehensive assessment yet of the safety of fracking, a technique that has led to a boom in domestic oil and gas production but also spawned persistent complaints about pollution. Fracking involves the injection of water, sand and chemicals underground to break apart shale rock and free trapped oil or gas.
    Water Resources
    Thomas Burke, the EPA’s top science adviser, told reporters that given thousands of wells drilled and fracked in the last few years, “the number of documented impacts on groundwater resources is relatively low.”
    Still, it’s not accurate to say that there have been no cases of contamination, he said.
    “There are instances where the fracking activity itself” led to water pollution, he said.
    The EPA looked at the potential for spills of fracking fluids, poor wastewater disposal or migration of chemicals shot underground.
    The American Petroleum Institute, an industry trade group, said the study was a validation of the safety of fracking. It said it showed existing oversight from state regulators is working.
    “Hydraulic fracturing is being done safely under the strong environmental stewardship of state regulators and industry best practices,” Erik Milito, API’s upstream group director, said in an e-mail.
    Bigger Risk
    When the study began much of the focus was on the risk that chemicals mixed in fracking fluids could flow through underground fissures and into underground water reservoirs. The study results show that might not be the biggest risk.
    “The process of fracking itself is one risk factor. But in fact it’s not the biggest one,” said Mark Brownstein, vice president of the Environmental Defense Fund. “Ongoing physical integrity of the wells and handling the millions of gallons of wastewater coming back to the surface after fracking, over the lifetime of each well, are even bigger challenges.”
    Amy Mall, a senior policy analyst for the Natural Resources Defense Council, said the study provides “solid science that fracking has contaminated drinking water across the country.”
    Mall said, however, that a lack of cooperation from industry meant EPA lacked key data necessary to fully assess its safety.
    Another environmental group, Earthworks, said EPA analysis points to the need for regulation.
    “Now the Obama administration, Congress, and state governments must act on that information to protect our drinking water, and stop perpetuating the oil and gas industry’s myth that fracking is safe,” said Lauren Pagel, Earthwork’s policy director, in an e-mail.
    The EPA said it analyzed more than 950 sources of information. The study included an analysis of industry-backed disclosures of the chemicals used in fracking, case-studies of local communities where homeowners feared their water wells were contaminated and a review of well construction.
    The EPA said as many as 30,000 fracked wells were drilled annually between 2011 to 2014, as oil production reached its highest level in more than three decades.
    “People in favor of drilling will see this as vindication,” said Rob Jackson, a Stanford University professor who has tested drinking water near fracking sites in Texas, Pennsylvania and other states. “People opposed to it will see this as a whitewash.”

    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-06-04/u-s-epa-study-finds-only-limited-water-pollution-from-fracking

    in reply to: Primanti Bros coming to Ohio #1076769

    goldenidea
    Participant

    I’ve visited the Primanti Bros (original?) restaurant on Market Square in downtown Pittsburgh. Very nice setting, nice place & nice people! I also enjoyed their corned beef, but I like my fries on the side, not in my sandwich. Better to taste the meat that way. That’s why I prefer Jake’s corned beef sandwich on Public Square in downtown Cleveland!


    goldenidea
    Participant

    From the linked article: “At 5-feet an hour, the massive 95-ton drill is doing its best to churn through miles of limestone. “We encountered more water than we anticipated so we had a big overhaul of the machine to deal with that,” Hall said.””

    I wonder why they’ve encountered more water than anticipated. Drilled into a previously undetected/unexpected fractured bedrock zone? Plug off the water boys, them high water bills are hard to handle!

    in reply to: Grandview Yard – News & Updates #1076767

    goldenidea
    Participant

    Based solely on drive-by observations: It seems physically impossible to add sidewalks under the existing railroad bridge. The underpass looks too narrow and steep.

    Perhaps this much needed improvement has been deferred because they wanted to first focus on actual development of the Yard and wait to see how that impacted traffic? Or perhaps it’s been delayed because they don’t own that real estate (i.e. the road/right of way/railroad bridge, etc.). I believe that earlier someone posted on this thread that a new, wider bridge is planned that will eliminate this bottleneck and will hopefully to include sidewalks & bike lanes. Meanwhile, one needs to be patient and keep dodging the cars!

    BTW, even after we do get a new bridge and wider underpass, it will be challenging and expensive to put sideways along the north side of 3rd Ave along/behind the Fort Tribeca garages. Why developers of that complex didn’t build sidewalks along that stretch of the 3rd Ave roadway, while they were building, is hard to know.


    goldenidea
    Participant

    Anyone know his name? I’ve been waiting for an obvious candidate. He gets my vote for mayor!

    in reply to: Interactive Play hours at Scioto Mile Fountain Changed #1075003

    goldenidea
    Participant

    Isn’t this mostly a matter of some Waterford residents resisting change? They are used to having peace & quiet, because it was mostly peaceful and quiet in that area until the fountain arrived. Waterford isn’t a super-pricey condo building, but long term residents there DID have a quiet environment despite living in the center of the city. They are reacting to change, just like some people dislike some emerging characteristics of the “new” Short North or the issues created by the ever-growing, more rowdy crowds at ComFest.

    So the question is, are these legacy or established residents entitled to keep some of the environment they have always had, at least for part of every evening, or do those who wish to use the new fountain now get priority? It is not a class or racial issue. The new hours seem like a fair and reasonable solution, especially if they match hours at other similar recreation facilities across the city.

    in reply to: BrewDog US Expansion #1073815

    goldenidea
    Participant

    Does anyone know how much space Rogue is taking at Timken vs. the total area available? Timken is so large, it’s hard to imagine Rogue taking even half of it.

    in reply to: Downtown's next big move? #1072891

    goldenidea
    Participant

    The “blue dragon snake” was actually meant to be a serpent, symbolic of Ohio’s serpent mounds built by and of great spiritual significance to some of Ohio’s native American tribes. I agree that was an excellent concept & proposal. I don’t recall why it was never built… probably too costly, but the idea was a great one! Back when it was proposed, there was a cover story in “The Other Paper” or another weekly that described it.

    in reply to: Building Collapse in OTE #1072884

    goldenidea
    Participant

    In case anyone has interest, here are some key personal observations on our historic masonry (brick) buildings: exterior walls consist to two layers of brick, an outer & an inner layer. The outer layer bricks are usually more ornate; they are harder (they were kilned at hotter temps), more durable, less porous and therefore more weather resistant. This outer brick layer serves as the building’s “shell”. The inner bricks are softer and less weather resistant. Most people/building owners rarely see the inner bricks as they are covered by plaster on the inside and covered by the outer brick layer outside. The inner bricks serve as an important element of the building’s structure. They bear much of the vertical load, supporting the interior framing of the building: the floor joists & roof rafters.

    This inner brick layer or course is vulnerable to weathering and degradation when exposed to the elements, which normally does not happen. They shouldn’t be allowed to get wet, and if the building is heated over winters, will normally not freeze. But when exposed to rainfall/snowfall/wetting coupled with many winter seasons of freezing/thawing, especially in a vacant, unheated building, the inner brick layer can be damaged.

    Roof leaks, broken/missing windows, bad gutters & downspouts, and bad exterior mortar joints allow water to enter and wet the inner bricks and many cycles of freezing/thawing work on the inner layer to gradually disintegrate bricks that get wet from such “leaks”. Once a enough of the inner layer disintegrates, things go downhill, even though the exterior bricks may still look fine. This was probably the first big step toward how/why the wall in this building failed.

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 373 total)

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