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Viewing 15 posts - 886 through 900 (of 902 total)
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  • in reply to: What and why do you buy local? #319709
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    jenlauren wrote >>
    Mostly food, including a split half of beef every year. I would love some suggestions on farmers for pork, lamb and poultry. My chest freezer is sadly empty right now.
    For me, I find that overall it is less expensive and tastes batter. I buy in bulk from the farmers market, add that to what I grow on my own and I end up doing a lot of freezing and canning.
    I always prefer to support local business owners when I can, even when that means that what I am buying isn’t locally made. At least some of the profit stays in the community. And to me that is what buying local is about. Keeping as much money on your local ecomony which in turn spurs growth.

    Here is the best resource to find whatever you want, just type in the name under product search.

    http://www.oeffa.org/search-geg.php

    in reply to: What and why do you buy local? #319698
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    I buy most all of my meat locally. While this can get expensive really fast, if you can find a local farmer you trust it can be downright cheap. I pay less than 3 bucks a pound for pastured chicken and grass fed heritage breed pork. 75-100# of each yearly for the chest freezer gets us through the year. I have not found a beef source that I really like so if we need burger meat I can get Ohio stuff at Rife’s or Carfagna’s and know who cut it. Not grass fed however, but better than stuff from 100,000 head feedlots out west where then can grind 100 cows at a time into burger. Eggs are also local, tons of people will sell you crazy fresh eggs and the taste is so superior to regular eggs I cannot go back. Vegetable wise I grow most of them myself and can and freeze. Great local sources are Lynd’s and Hann farms, but you need to be able to store stuff in season to use out of season. Both of those are way cheaper than the supermarket as well. The funny thing is that most think buy local to be expensive, but looking around and using some storage techniques I have found brings the cost to less than getting it at the supermarket in most cases.

    in reply to: 100 Things Restaurant Staffers Should Not Do #312984
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    Nearly ninety percent of the list does not bug me as I am the cook and the clean up person in my house which means that when people ask me what meal is my favorite I reply ” The one that someone else cooks and cleans for me” However number 64 resonated in that I dont care how awesome a special sounds I dont order it unless you tell me the price, especially after paying 40 bucks for one particularly awesome sounding special.

    in reply to: Skillet #311490
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    Bear wrote >>
    Oh, btw… I asked how they were planning to carry the seasonal-cooking thing through the winter. They had some creative answers: old farmers’ tricks like keeping beets in the ground with hay over the top (?!? — news to me), potatoes from cold storage, that sort of thing. But the answer that amused me most was that they considered the pig to be a major winter ingredient.

    It is. All meat is. Eat your veggies in the spring, summer and fall and meat in the winter. That is how it was always done. My hog from Springhill(grass fed Heritage Tamworth- boo yah!) goes to slaughter tomorrow and that is what I will eat all winter mixed with the vegetables I froze and canned. Wont have hardly any salad until the overwintered spinach and arugula is ready in march.

    in reply to: Next “up and coming area” in C-Bus #311383
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    Lower Grandview. South of first, east of say Woodhill or so. 30 acres of former Big Bear warehouse area being turned into shops, offices, condos and restaurants by Nationwide realty. Arena district meets Easton. All will be walkable easily from there with Grandview schools and a view of downtown. That area is relatively affordable compared to on the hill in Grandview and about to get way more fun. Already been leveled and the building has started. All the other places need other stuff to happen. This area is safe, close, already invested in, best schools, etc. Wish I had cash to get rental properties as well as wish I did not think we are only in a speed bump towards a worsening recession.

    in reply to: Home Security Systems #307970
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    I do not have a service for home security. My primary worry is someone breaking in at night when my family is home. Besides a safe neighborhood, good nieghbors that I know, motion sensors on my lights front and back and a fairly decent home arsenal I have found good peace of mind using these:

    http://www.taylorbrothersdoorlock.com/

    I am thinking of adding some front and rear glassbreak sensors, but it would be next to impossible to get my doors open quiety with on of these on it.

    in reply to: Cat Question #304173
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    AmyArt21 wrote >>

    derm wrote >>

    AmyArt21 wrote >>

    derm wrote >>
    Interesting thread. Partial disclosure. I am a Veterinarian with 13 years in private practice here in Columbus. I work at 2 of the practices mention in this thread. It is important to note that like everything in life, with a cat dental,for the majority of cases, you get what you pay for. No more, no less.

    I am just wondering what might be the reason for my estimate having such a wide range.
    $380 is very different from $760.

    Too hard to say without seeing your cats teeth, its age, or health. The range may include extractions, xrays, fluid therapy, extra long anesthetic time if involved, pre-anesthetic testing of heart, kidneys, liver, etc. Take the 2 estimates, put them side to side and examine the costs and see what is included on one and not on the other. If they include the exact same things, then one place is just more expensive. I have a feeling the more expensive place quoted for all contingencies.

    What I meant is that my quote from one vet was $380-$760. So if I get the procedure done there, I can expect to pay ANYWHERE in that range.

    I am guessing you have an older cat with a pretty bad old cat mouth, although I have seen some rotten mouths on young cats as well. They have a whole host of species specific diseases and cats especially can have a bad mouth at a young age due to resorptive disease. If so this is a pretty normal quote to me. Your vet will not know exactly what is going to happen with the mouth until they get the pet under anesthesia(not sedated, I mean general anesthesia, cats do not rinse and spit, you have to protect the airway) and can do an exam of the teeth with the probes.(Same ones a human dentist uses). Each tooth has to be evaluated for health and stability and if it is bad, may need extracted. XRay of the teeth may need to be taken to evaluate periodontal health. If there is tartar covering the tooth you dont know what you will get until it is cleaned. They dont know how long the procedure will be before going in. It is much better if you let a client know up front that it could be that much instead of surprising them at pickup time. I am sure that your vet would have no problem going over exactly what they want to do, what the concerns are, what possible difficulties they expect, etc if you call them and ask to discuss the procedure further. I encourage you to do this as I think you have questions.

    in reply to: Cat Question #304166
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    AmyArt21 wrote >>

    derm wrote >>
    Interesting thread. Partial disclosure. I am a Veterinarian with 13 years in private practice here in Columbus. I work at 2 of the practices mention in this thread. It is important to note that like everything in life, with a cat dental,for the majority of cases, you get what you pay for. No more, no less.

    I am just wondering what might be the reason for my estimate having such a wide range.
    $380 is very different from $760.

    Too hard to say without seeing your cats teeth, its age, or health. The range may include extractions, xrays, fluid therapy, extra long anesthetic time if involved, pre-anesthetic testing of heart, kidneys, liver, etc. Take the 2 estimates, put them side to side and examine the costs and see what is included on one and not on the other. If they include the exact same things, then one place is just more expensive. I have a feeling the more expensive place quoted for all contingencies.

    in reply to: Cat Question #304165
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    misskitty wrote >>
    Dear Veterinarian ,
    Has your place of business had any experience with Pet insurance?
    Do you think it is helpful or not?
    Have you heard good or bad things about it?
    What is your opinion on it?

    It has its place. If you are going to get it. Start with a new puppy or kitten and sign up before the first exam. Like any insurance they ding you for pre-existing conditions, so if I hear a heart murmur the first exam, forget about cardiac diseases being covered if you have no insurance. It can be pretty good for paying for preventive care and disasters. They are usually re-imbursement payers.

    in reply to: Cat Question #304161
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    Interesting thread. Partial disclosure. I am a Veterinarian with 13 years in private practice here in Columbus. I work at 2 of the practices mention in this thread. It is important to note that like everything in life, with a cat dental,for the majority of cases, you get what you pay for. No more, no less. Yep there are probably some less than honest people, also there are some straight shooters. If you like and trust the person you take your cat for then that is pretty important. Ask your veterinarian why if their dental is 100, why are others 500 and if other dentals are 100 dollars why is yours 500? Pay close attention to the answers. I am fully prepared to answer that question when someone asks me in the exam room. Make sure your vet does the same. The places I work for are not 100 dollar places, nor are they 500 dollar places. What answers do you get? Veterinary medicine and human medicine quite honestly are extremely similar. (Read that as they use the exact same tools, education, medicine, equipement, and research). You quite honestly are doing a cost benefit analysis. If you went in to a human surgeon and they gave you a piece of paper of the things that you could pick as options for a surgery which of these would you pick?

    1. experienced doctor
    2. trained/certified staff
    3. most upgraded facility
    4. newest techniques
    5. best critical care if something goes wrong.
    6. most up to date medicines/anesthetics
    7. most accurate anesthesia monitoring devices
    8. best diagnostic equipment
    9. most staff members per case.
    10. pre-anesthetic bloodwork/ekg/testing

    Any sane human would say I want every one of those. Different in veterinary medicine as you get to pick what you want. If those are important to you then ask about them. Make whatever choice you wish. I understand that the budget comes in to play, it does in my house as well. This post was not meant to steer you into a direction, or judge you in any way at all, just to educate you and make you ask questions. Anyone that is taking the best care that they can/afford for the pets they own gets a gold star from me. You will be rewarded for it someday. Truly. I have seen enough rotten pet owners that I know that anyone that cares enough to simply bring a pet into the clinic to see what is wrong is pretty special. I know that sometimes it is all we can do to keep them comfortable and happy. I wish I could treat them all for free, but then I and my staff would be out of business in a week. Plain and simple, most of the time the difference in price for a dental(or a spay, or neuter,etc) is how many of the list is included. As long as you are trying your best, you get no argument from me.

    in reply to: Hellas Kitchen opening at old Cowtown Pizza location #300983
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    Saw it as well, have not been there. Keeping an eye out for cheap but good gyros.

    in reply to: Pierogis in Columbus #296874
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    Cookie wrote >>

    joev wrote >>
    Pierogis are made of exactly the same ingredients they use in Ireland – flour, butter, potato, cabbage, cream.

    This is going to get uglier than The Grilled Cheese Incident.

    I will toss another flour, butter, potato thing in. My kids ate them and liked them but said ” I like your gnocchi better.” I like them the same, but for a similar amount of time to make, I guess I will spend the time making gnocchi. Maybe we need a gnocchi thread.

    in reply to: Pierogis in Columbus #296843
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    Mde them last night, very tasty. The bacon camp winner dough recipe makes a fabulous dough. Very easy to work with. I should have double the dough recipe as I had lots of filling left over however. 8 left in the fridge for snacks.

    in reply to: Creative Things to Do With Eggplant #293710
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    patient_zero wrote >>
    Hey – this sounds good. So I guess you just slice them in long sheets on a mandolin slicer? How long does it go into the oven to bake?

    Mandolins work great. Cooking wise, Not very long unless you mix some egg in with your ricotta filling then you have to make sure it is cooked. If you do a simple filling of ricotta, basil, garlic, and parmesan inside cooked eggplant(cooked until soft enough to roll), At that point it is just heating all the flavors together. I sometimes add egg to make the filling stay inside the roll better and ooze out less, but both ways are good.

    in reply to: Creative Things to Do With Eggplant #293707
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    Or just roast it in the oven in a lasagna pan with sweet potatoes, onions, peppers, squash, mushrooms, red potatoes. Toss in olive oil, salt pepper and a little paprika for color.

Viewing 15 posts - 886 through 900 (of 902 total)