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Viewing 15 posts - 856 through 870 (of 902 total)
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  • in reply to: What is everyone currently reading? #103799
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    Just plugged through the George RR Martin “Game of Thrones” series. Dont know when he will finish the books, but the ones I read were pretty good. Not for the youngins tho.

    in reply to: How Does Your Garden Grow? #250455
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    TomOver said:
    I’m lucky in terms of having full sun for several hours every day from early spring to late fall in the backyard. I think I’ll do what you suggest for raised beds, preferring to not use forms.

    Are you using low tunnels now ? Friends at Four Seasons City Farm are growing, and plan to sell beets and other veggies this winter by using them as well as hoop houses.

    How much does extending the growing season interest you ?

    A ton. I use row cover every year to extend harvest and get an early start on next springs greens. I am eating spinach, arugula and misc lettuce right now that I started six weeks ago. It has two layers of row cover on it. It has never failed over the winter with this method and I will get all u can eat for two to three months starting in early March of these greens. I can even pop the top and harvest in december to feb if we get a brief warmup.

    in reply to: How Does Your Garden Grow? #250453
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    TomOver said:
    There is a book by a guy who recommends not using the bio-intensive method which he said is based on the increasingly false assumption of having plentiful water. According to him, we should expect peak oil to affect the availability of safe, municipal water.

    Permaculture media blog

    I only read part of the link, but find that an odd assumption based on the fact that the biointensive method is basically how people gardened before municipal water supplies and commercial fertilizer existed. The use of mulch eliminates the need for frequent watering when coupled with organic matter enriched soil and compost heavy soil does not need a commercial, petroleum based fertilizer. I grow heavy feeders every year in my kitchen garden with compost only as the additive. A small rain barrel can assist watering if needed when young and then if you mulch your plants the ground will hold the moisture a long time. Especially here in clay heavy OH. Maybe that writer is in Arizona.

    in reply to: How Does Your Garden Grow? #250452
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    TomOver said:
    In the backyard it’s about 18 ft from north to south and about 50 ft from east to west.

    That is a nice size. You could do about eight four foot wide beds, eighteen feet long with a south face and two foot paths between them. Great for rotation of crops and you could eliminate tilling. You would not have to build forms, I used to just define mine by heaping up the dirt from the paths then laying down a heavy mulch from tree trimming trucks. 8-10″ of wood chips on the paths is a good weed deterrent and you keep your feet from being wet or muddy in the garden. I wish I had a sunny backyard.

    in reply to: How Does Your Garden Grow? #250446
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    What are your garden’s dimensions by the way?

    in reply to: How Does Your Garden Grow? #250445
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    I loosely follow the biointensive method, meaning I try to use raised beds(part of my gardening is community garden) That is a no till method to avoid soil compaction. When I had raised beds I did not ever till them. I would dump compost on them and then use a garden fork to lightly mix. Right now in my yard I have about 120 square feet of kitchen garden, it is raised beds and never gets tilled. Just compost dumped on top and loosely mixed when I plant. If you could do that at your home garden it has the benefits of dedicated watering, fertilizing, avoidance of soil compaction and ease of mulching. You concentrate your compost as well. I do a talk for Grandview Parks and REc every year going over things like this. YOu are welcome to attend. It is weds Feb 1st. I will post on it later in the winter.

    in reply to: How Does Your Garden Grow? #250443
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    TomOver said:
    The kale, collards and headless cabbage( whose leaves may be savory, not merely palatable and edible) are doing well in this photo taken on Thanksgiving Day.

    But the scene below would be better if there were a large, 3-section compost bin, likely about a foot away from that wooden fence.

    I’ve buried hundreds of pounds of food scraps in the soil in this photo and the soil to its unphotographed left. That’s better than ‘throwing it away,’ even if some of the methane at the Franklin County Landfill is being used to power CNG vehicles.

    Though I don’t bury food scraps too close to growing plants, what is buried enriches the soil after a few months or more.

    But this is not good enough. Using a compost bin or red wiggler worms would be better. Digging up the ground in order to bury food scraps disrupts microbes and earth worms.

    What are other folk here doing in regards to composting ?

    Kale, collards, and headless cabbage in late November central Ohio garden

    I have a large cedar compost pile, four by four by six that I do by the cold method. It was just recently emptied into the kitchen garden and restarted with the leaves from the yard intermixed with compost from the piled I saved as a starter. It gets all the scraps from teh kitchen all year. I sort of turn it and poke it with rebar for air holes during the year.

    Right now with that compost the kitchen garden has a patch of arugula, spinach and lettuce that I can occasionally harvest that will overwinter in place for a huge spring harvest we eat off until spring lettuce is ready.

    For yours I would get a small roll of rabbit fencing to put in one corner of your garden that I would put compost in then pick the fence up and move every year to a new corner, spreading the stuff out after moving the fence in the fall then start a new pile with leaves and garden waste. I did this for years in a different spot. Only takes up 4 square feet and you can grow squash in it in the summer. a 25 foot roll of fencing makes two 4 foot in diameter three foot high compost bins.

    in reply to: Homelessness in Columbus #470229
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    I have lived in the area for twenty years. Columbus, German Village, Grandview, Campus. The homeless problem in my opinion has worsened each year. They are much more aggressive than before and while I have no good solution. I think that the City of Columbus needs to do more than they do. Now that I live in Grandview I dont ever see them locally. And that is with a large homeless camp right at the base of Goodale and Grandview avenue. They have a zero tolerance policy, so there was no start of the snowball rolling downhill. Grandview does not have the crime numbers to deal with so they have many more resources to allocate I admit. Still the people will go where they are allowed. Nowadays when the cold weather hits, you will not be able to get a seat at the Columbus Metropolitan Library and it was not that way even two years ago. There will be scores of homeless folks and all their wordly goods on every seat. I donate to and volunteer occasionally at NNEMAP, they serve a good number of homeless with as much easy open food as they can and NNEMAPP is hurting for donations. Not nearly as much as they could use. It is going to get worse.

    in reply to: LED Energy Efficient Lighting. both residential and commercial fixtures. #470040
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    LED’s are dirt cheap. Youu can get a hundred sent to you for a few bucks off ebay. Problem is the electronics to run the little buggers can be expensive. You could solder 50 of them together and get a massively bright light when plugged into a socket- for a microsecond, then 50 little puffs of smoke. They need a microcontroller than pulses the current, which has been reduced via a resistor to milliamps. Household AC current is great for most but needs waaay reduced for an LED. That is why LED Christmas light strings have like 100 lights and a little box near the plug. And cost more. Run off batteries it is better. I have a bunch of LED lights I booty fabbed up to run off 12v batteries if I lose power. They could run for days then gradually fade as the battery ran low. LED’s are a cheap fun thing to play with if you like electronicly things.

    in reply to: Grandview Ave & Dublin Rd Redeveopment #468307
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    That is quite an area for those who are unfamiliar with it. It is not easily accessed into the Grandview scene due to railroad tracks between it and Goodale. It has multiple ponds, rumors of buried train stations, quite the wildlife population as well as a thriving homeless community. Very few 35 acres woodlots in sight of downtown. I was glad for no Walmart, but hope they do something good with it. If they do then the Steak Escape will have plenty of patrons. Dont know where the campers will go. It is unknown how many live there as the only “road” to get there is the csx service road behind the NAPA on GView ave.

    in reply to: Kitchen Remodel – Ikea Installer? #467778
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    I might be interested in buying your old stuff from you as well to help finance the project. I have a Licking County place that needs cabinets.

    in reply to: Trader Joe's Opening Larger Stores to Compete with Big Box Chains #467508
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    Trader Joes to me seems to be morphing into a Whole Foods concept. I used to go there a ton to get deals on really cool product that I could not believe they could carry at that price. Now they still carry it, but it is not a deal. Now I go to Aldi’s which is owned by the Trader Joe’s guys and is exactly what Trader Joes used to be. You can get schocking deals there that come in a package that looks just like it does at Trader Joes. They had baby bella mushrooms last week for 59 cents a package. I got 14 packages. The awesome Trader Joes guacamole is for sale at Aldi’s for 2.99 for a box and a buck more at Trader Joes now.

    in reply to: kiln brick+kaowool FREE! #457912
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    I would love some. I am going to build both a clay oven for baking and thinking of building a rocket stove as well. I will call you and thanks!

    in reply to: Wendy's Classic Breakfast Sandwich #456937
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    Looks yummy to me tho!

    in reply to: Wendy's Classic Breakfast Sandwich #456936
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    I am trying to figure out where the 11 grams of fiber came from in that. Not the cheese, eggs, chicken, bacon, gravy or much in the biscuits. 10 grams of fiber in the taters?

Viewing 15 posts - 856 through 870 (of 902 total)

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