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Millennials Dump Cars for Trains, Bikes, Buses

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Transportation Millennials Dump Cars for Trains, Bikes, Buses

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 52 total)
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  • #491673
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    cheap said:
    i wonder if he took this survey

    Doesn’t matter if he took the survey. It sounds like his anecdotal story is already more important in your book than any real measurement of larger national trends.

    #491674

    cheap
    Member

    Walker said:
    Doesn’t matter if he took the survey. It sounds like his anecdotal story is already more important in your book than any real measurement of larger national trends.

    nice assumption,but off course.

    i figure it this way

    walking builds character

    #491675

    News
    Participant

    Young People Are Driving Less—And Not Just Because They’re Broke
    JAKE BLUMGART
    June 11, 2012

    As a teenager, I had little interest in driving. I lived in Prince George’s County, Maryland, mere blocks from the D.C. city line, with a bus hub down the hill and three Metro stations a mile or so from my parents’ house. And by the time my weekend evenings were done, I was rarely in any shape to get behind the wheel. (Sorry, Mom!)

    READ MORE: http://www.good.is/post/young-people-are-driving-less-and-not-just-because-they-re-broke/

    #491676

    Analogue Kid
    Participant
    #491677

    peanutnozone
    Participant

    <]As a teenager, I had little interest in driving. I lived in Prince George’s County, Maryland

    Ahh, PG county. Where the richest and the poorest can be found in a single jurisdiction.

    I have noticed a trend among my age group (mid 20s – early 30s) about this. But they are split into two groups: one sees car ownership as something that stamps you as upwardly mobile (career, money, status, blah blah blah) and other, who see it as something of subscribing to that paradigm, and to them that’s not good. It’s almost like…you don’t respect the environment, sustainable stuff, etc…in other words being selfish. Someone I know actually described it like that, but I would see that as the extreme end of the spectrum.

    Times, they are a-changin’…

    #491678

    lifeontwowheels
    Participant

    Nah, I just don’t like driving.

    #491679

    News
    Participant

    Megabus, the Recovery of American Downtowns, and the Resurgence of the Bus Industry
    Posted Monday at 3:58 p.m. By Whet Moser

    I used to take buses a lot: Vegas to Chicago and back, Chicago to Virginia, a long couple-weeks loop from Virginia to Chicago to several northeastern cities, Chicago to Atlanta. But I haven’t been on a bus in a few years, because of my uniquely bad luck with fellow passengers. There was the time a guy cooking up in the stall next to me at the Chicago Greyhound station got dragged out under the door by a couple cops; the guy who got kicked off the bus for threatening to cut someone’s heart out; the time I got woken up when the bus almost went into a spin; the time I got woken up by someone’s hand covering my face; the guy with the white-supremacist tattoo at 4a.m. in rural Kentucky. Bus travel got a bit wearying after awhile, and I haven’t been on one since 2007 or so.

    READ MORE: http://www.chicagomag.com/Chicago-Magazine/The-312/January-2013/Megabus-the-Recovery-of-Downtowns-and-the-Resurgence-of-the-Bus-Industry/

    #491680

    gramarye
    Participant

    The author’s point about the tradeoff between money and time has been my experience as well. Even though I hate airports with a burning fiery passion, I’ve often found myself flying rather than taking an intercity train or bus because of the time factor involved; even after budgeting the extra time necessary to get from the out-of-the-way airport into the actual heart of where I’m going, the plane often comes out ahead. The extra money for flying is less of an obstacle now that I’m working; the extra time on the bus or train is less worth it now that I’m working.

    I still want to take the Amtrak from Cleveland to Chicago one of these days, just to give it a try, but there’s another time issue with that: The arrival and departure times in Cleveland are always in the middle of the graveyard hours.

    #491681
    Steve
    Steve
    Participant

    This is great. I enjoy taking the MegaBus to Chicago.

    I also just found out about a rural-areas bus (http://www.ridegobus.com/) for southern Ohio. I wonder what sort of ridership they’re seeing.

    Found some info on GoBus!

    2012 was a great year!

    52,012 people took trips with us this past year. That’s a 72.8% increase from 2011. Our ridership averaged 142 passengers per day and 4334 passengers per month.

    #491682

    News
    Participant

    Why aren’t younger Americans driving anymore?
    Posted by Brad Plumer on April 22, 2013 at 11:02 am

    Ever since the recession hit in late 2007, Americans have been driving less and less. Was that because of the horrible economy? To some extent, perhaps. But it’s striking that Americans are still cutting back on driving even though the economy is growing again.

    Doug Short, who charts financial data, has put together a nice graph that uses the latest Transportation Department data on vehicle-miles driven and adjusts for population growth. Looked at this way, the plunge in driving is even more startling and began back in June 2005:

    READ MORE: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/04/22/why-arent-younger-americans-driving-anymore/

    #491683

    News
    Participant

    The Changing Story Of Teens And Cars
    by SONARI GLINTON
    August 09, 2013 3:03 AM

    When you’re a teenager, there are many things you desperately want to find: friends, fun, a future, freedom. In American Graffiti, the iconic movie about teenagers set in 1962, the kids find all of that just by getting in their cars. The teenagers spend a whole lot of time tooling around in their cars — looking, cruising.

    But the deep relationship between American teen culture and the automobile depicted in the film has changed. Young people are driving less, getting their licenses later and waiting longer to purchase their first new car.

    READ MORE: http://www.npr.org/2013/08/09/210253451/the-changing-story-of-teens-and-cars

    #491684

    Coy
    Participant

    Well, the cars in American Graffiti were way cooler and sexier than anything on the road today… cars today are generally moving toward the exact same design aesthetic, while simultaneously being crazy expensive. We’re gonna need a new car soon, and I’m not looking forward to it.

    Motorcycles, however, thats another thing entirely… I’d like to see MC ridership numbers over the same period.

    #491685

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    I bet the AMA knows. You can’t just look at sales like you can with cars because bikes usually end up lasting longer since they don’t get used as often.

    I do know sales of sub-500cc bikes are way up and Harley sales are way down among young people. Harley needs to reach out to younger people or somehow get an icon again. People used to think of Peter Fonda, James Dean and Motley Crue when they thought of Harleys, but now kids only think of old fat guys when they think of ’em. And then Harley went and doubled down on that rapidly perishing portion of the population by dumping Buell!

    I guess that’s what we do here, in the States, though is double down.

    #491686

    Coy
    Participant

    Yeah, Honda and maybe Kawasaki seem to be the only ones paying attention. Honda has a new line of 500cc bikes and a few new even smaller options (I think the Grom is one… mini-bikish option). My own bike is only 200cc.

    Was at Iron Pony this weekend and everything was 650cc or over… in fact, i think I only saw one 250cc, not inc the scooters. But I also saw about a dozen used Harleys.
    You’re dead on about HD… they can only count on the Sons of Anarchy for so much of a boost.
    Once you realize that you are associating yourself with the most conformist bunch ever, and that your bike actually sucks compared to any other bike, it’s kind of hard to justify continuing on one.

    I predict a LOT more smaller bikes in the next 5 years competing with cars. For around 5 grand you can get a japanese bike that will last you a decade of hard commuter driving at least, or spend 4-5 times that for a car.
    I was in Santiago Chile this summer and there were NO bikes over 250cc that I saw… most were 125cc, but plenty of them. And it was awesome to see them zipping all over the city… totally makes sense.

    #491687
    Snarf
    Snarf
    Participant

    Coy said:
    Yeah, Honda and maybe Kawasaki seem to be the only ones paying attention. Honda has a new line of 500cc bikes and a few new even smaller options (I think the Grom is one… mini-bikish option). My own bike is only 200cc.

    Was at Iron Pony this weekend and everything was 650cc or over… in fact, i think I only saw one 250cc, not inc the scooters. But I also saw about a dozen used Harleys.
    You’re dead on about HD… they can only count on the Sons of Anarchy for so much of a boost.
    Once you realize that you are associating yourself with the most conformist bunch ever, and that your bike actually sucks compared to any other bike, it’s kind of hard to justify continuing on one.

    I predict a LOT more smaller bikes in the next 5 years competing with cars. For around 5 grand you can get a japanese bike that will last you a decade of hard commuter driving at least, or spend 4-5 times that for a car.
    I was in Santiago Chile this summer and there were NO bikes over 250cc that I saw… most were 125cc, but plenty of them. And it was awesome to see them zipping all over the city… totally makes sense.

    I’m curious what drives your motivation to see an influx of smaller displacement motorcycles into the marketplace?

    If it’s to promote the legitimacy of two wheeled travel as normal transportation, then perpetuating negative stereotypes about certain segments of motorcyclists would only serve to defeat your purpose. We need that legitimacy as a whole. Or rather if it’s the idea that a motorcycle is only manageable to a beginner within a certain displacement, I find that confusing as well – any 600cc sportbike would ride circles around my 900cc Triumph Scrambler.

    And stereotypes are many, not just reserved for Harley riders. But I, like you, hope to see a push towards more people, especially younger, enjoy our sport so we should pass on them. BTW I’ve never owned a Harley but I’m familiar enough with them to consider them a well build and extremely high quality machine – to think any other brand bike of similarity can outperform or outlast seems frivolous.

    I hope I didn’t put any words in your mouth I was kind of skimming the last two entries with my response.

    Anyways, motorcyclists – let’s all get along ;)

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 52 total)

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