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Women in leadership roles - should their looks be mentioned?

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Women in leadership roles – should their looks be mentioned?

Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 88 total)
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  • #1051159
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Isn’t it possible to have multiple discussion threads around the same general topic?

    Yes, of course. There will always be a natural flow/shift to a conversation. I’m not asking for strict adherence to a specific topic… just asking that anyone attempting intentional derailings with ridiculous strawman arguments to give it a rest. ;)

    #1051160

    myliftkk
    Participant

    The thread topic doesn’t really narrow it down though.

    Women in leadership roles – should their looks be mentioned?

    So your example then goes into just the Columbus CEO. I’d say edit the thread title to “Should looks be addressed in Columbus CEO magazine?”

    Cuz based on this thread, CEOs and their looks get mentioned in all forms of media.

    Except they don’t in all media. As I said, read the HBR link.

    Actually, if you wanted to bother to read white papers on the subject, there’s studies being done about the imapct of a beautiful CEO on shareholder value.

    Beauty is Wealth: CEO Appearance and Shareholder Value

    Now, if the working paper conclusion holds up in further research

    We further hypothesize and test two channels through which more attractive CEOs enhance shareholder value: negotiating and visibility. To test the negotiating channel, we examine the stock price reactions around M&A announcement dates and find a positive and significant CEO attractiveness effect on acquirer returns. This positive relation persists beyond one year following the mergers announcement dates. We test the visibility channel by first investigating the stock price reaction around CEO television news event dates and find that more attractive CEOs are associated with better stock returns surrounding CEO-related television news days. However, we find no significant relation between CEO attractiveness and stock returns around a matched sample of non-television news events. In a second test, we continue to find the positive and significant CEO attractiveness effects on stock returns surrounding earnings announcement dates with CEO image, but insignificant effects around earnings announcement dates without the CEO’s image. These findings mitigate the endogeneity concerns when interpreting our findings. Overall, our results suggest that more attractive CEOs create value for shareholders through better negotiating prowess and visibility.

    Then we can still go back and point out the writing in the magazine was bad because it should have instead mentioned the CEOs beauty was a potential asset to shareholders.

    #1051161

    OneBagTravel
    Participant

    brb, making “Who is the sexist CEO in Columbus” thread =^o

    #1051164

    myliftkk
    Participant

    post^2

    #1051166
    Anne Evans
    Anne Evans
    Keymaster

    The thread topic doesn’t really narrow it down though.

    Women in leadership roles – should their looks be mentioned?

    So your example then goes into just the Columbus CEO. I’d say edit the thread title to “Should looks be addressed in Columbus CEO magazine?”

    Cuz based on this thread, CEOs and their looks get mentioned in all forms of media.

    Yes, that was the example I was using, but I am broadening it with the title to include women in leadership roles. I don’t think their looks should be a part of things written about them when they are being written about for their accomplishments in the business world. Others think it’s fine. People are not going to agree on everything. I just want to have a discussion about it. ;)

    My take away from this discussion is to be conscious of how words come across in my own writing. And to continue to teach my own children (and other children) that a person’s looks (and their own looks) don’t correlate to their abilities.

    #1051174
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    Great advice for anyone who gets offended or upset over spotting possible social injustice.

    Thanks. Does seem like some get flustered before considering things.

    #1051176
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    Yes, that was the example I was using, but I am broadening it with the title to include women in leadership roles. I don’t think their looks should be a part of things written about them when they are being written about for their accomplishments in the business world.

    Just so I’m clear, since we know appearance of both men and women CEOs / those in leadership roles is remarked upon the “their” you refer too is only women, or are you speaking out against a consideration of attractiveness more generally?

    #1051178
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    brb, making “Who is the sexist CEO in Columbus” thread =^o

    #1051199
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Hahaha! That was fun to help out the SNBA with their small business campaign but I can’t help but wonder if that ad caused Undone to go out of business. :P

    #1051201

    OneBagTravel
    Participant
    #1051208

    Schoolboy
    Participant

    For what it’s worth… When I see a “non attractive” CEO, I typically think wow that man/woman must be extremely good at their job.

    Had the story mentioned her beauty and tried to prove that she wasn’t the stereotypical attractive CEO, then I think said statement would have had value. The way it was written, no. Actually made me feel like she was more along the lines of the stereotype.

    #1051211
    Anne Evans
    Anne Evans
    Keymaster

    Just so I’m clear, since we know appearance of both men and women CEOs / those in leadership roles is remarked upon the “their” you refer too is only women, or are you speaking out against a consideration of attractiveness more generally?

    I’m taking issue with the notion that it was stated this lady could win a beauty contest, but she’s actually on the cover for her business acumen. I found that off-putting. If the same had been said about a man, I would have found it just as annoying. I don’t feel that sentence was written as a descriptor of Ms. Abell, it felt like an unnecessary justification for having her on the cover, and in today’s world, I think that’s not appropriate.

    #1051213
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    I’m taking issue with the notion that it was stated this lady could win a beauty contest, but she’s actually on the cover for her business acumen. I found that off-putting. If the same had been said about a man, I would have found it just as annoying.

    Thanks for that. Wasn’t sure I was reading you right.

    #1051214
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    Hahaha! That was fun to help out the SNBA with their small business campaign but I can’t help but wonder if that ad caused Undone to go out of business. :P

    Who says attractiveness isn’t a part of leadership ability? ;-)

    #1051241

    L.I. to Buckeye
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>L.I. to Buckeye wrote:</div>
    I find it interesting that the women posting in this thread seem to see an issue in the article, while most of the men don’t appear to see one. Some men are even trying to justify the mention of appearance in the article.

    I guess it shows once again that we see things through our own filters and against our own experiences.

    Bill Gates isn’t particularly attractive. But even if he was, I can’t imagine someone opening an article about his success with “Mr. Gates didn’t become one of the richest men in America because he’s attractive…”

    Most men know very little about the craft of writing beyond forum posts. So, first, they don’t see it as a #writingfailure and #understandingyouraudiencefailure, of which it’s both. And, as was rightly pointed out, also an #editorfailure. The example I posted specifically point out that for the “serious” business journalism, HBR, eschews this kind of puffery and slipshod writing has no place where you’re essentially pitching stories to the management “elite”.

    Unless, that is, Columbus CEO editors were expecting their management readership to immediately head into their executive suites and start fapping away the minute they saw the article unless they put that disclaimer on there. If that was the case, maybe they should have wrapped it in black plastic before delivery.

    But, to me, the issue isn’t the writing, per se. I have a problem with the fact that it even came up — that it was even a thought. Would it have been if she was a he (maybe her father)? I doubt it.

    I read the business article you posted and you know what stood out to me? That only one woman was included. Sure, they didn’t comment on her looks, but the other 10 or so CEOs were men. What does that say about women in business? We have a long way to go. How much of that can be attributed to the fact that attractiveness (or lack there of) can impact how women are viewed in the world of business?

    Articles like the one Anne posted aren’t helping women when they bring up their subjects’ looks.

Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 88 total)

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