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Wind Turbine in The University District

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Wind Turbine in The University District

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  • #474038

    SusanB
    Participant

    Columbus just requires water and a way to heat it. Rental properties are required to have some kind of “heat” as well.

    #474039

    Rockmastermike
    Participant

    rus said:

    Guess this guy gets a pass because it’s “green”.

    well, and because turbine towers rarely fall, and are regulated and insured as a MUCH lower risk than a large regulated AST of regulated flammable liquid (I’m very familiar with Ohio tank regulations, I have Ohio BUSTR installer cert.). Come on, rus, you’re *really* stretching the point on that.

    And, btw, building codes already regulate engineering standards for towers regardless of use, and commercially available turbines (they sell ’em at Lowes now, did you know that?) have built in overspeed protection on their very lightweight blades. Even given an overspeed failure, i’d rather have my house get hit with a 20 foot plastic or (better) carbon fiber blade than the shrapnel and fire from a LP tank blowout.

    ed: here’s an example: http://www.bergey.com/pages/excel_info max design windspeed 134mph.

    #474040
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    rus said:
    I’m surprised you’re not advocating for government to regulate private property with regard to windmills. Guess this guy gets a pass because it’s “green”.

    I didn’t say anything either way about whether or not I think this is a good idea. That’s beside the point anyway.

    I just found it predictably amusing that your response to someone wanting to build a wind turbine was reminder that a wind turbine exploded once on video. That’s got to be at least 100 times more dangerous than a lifetime of daily bacon consumption.

    Oh no watch out!

    #474041

    StormKing
    Participant

    Will this be taller than the trees in the area? If not, the owner will not be generating much electricity. Mature trees are often taller than 100 feet.

    #474042

    howatzer
    Participant

    Rockmastermike said:
    a tower that size can easily support one of Bergey Energy’s 10 kW turbines. The power pack on a Chevy Volt is 16kWh. Use google. Do the math. Charging times of 3-4 hours assuming a 10kw turbine even when the turbine is nowhere near peak and assuming charge efficiency losses. Use a 5kw turbine and perhaps double the times and you get a comfortable overnight charge.

    It’s fine with me if you wish to be “against” any kind of wind power on whatever ideological basis you care to invent, but there’s no reason not to just do some simple math and appear sorely misinformed.

    Wow. “Math” done in the style of a true geologist.

    The energy capacity of the battery does not equal the charging rate. To calculate that you would need the voltage. I’m assuming the generator will be on a 120v = 8 hours for a charge (assuming it’s windy). If it’s 240, then you could get down 4 hours (assuming it’s windy).

    If there’s no wind, he’ll need the other cars.

    What I like about geologists is they know a little about a lot of things. What I don’t like is that they pretend to know a lot.

    ETA: And if poking fun at someone who’s spending a substantial sum of money to build a monument to his green awareness next to where he parks his 3 automobiles is ideological…. guilty. Once we’ve lost our sensitivity to the absurd we have become absurd.

    #474043

    howatzer
    Participant

    and the picture above suggests a vertical, not horizontal (i.e. rockmastermike’s google favorite), turbine, so something like this or similar:

    quietrevolution qr5 turbine

    Dimenisions look about right, too.

    According to the company’s website, this unit generates about 4200 kWh for 1 year at an average wind speed of 5 m/s. Columbus’s average windspeed is more like 4 m/s, so say 3400 kWh per year. At the current $0.07 per kWh, that’s about $240 of energy generated per year.

    So it would take about 85 years to make your $20K investment back, longer if you include maintenance and the actual purchase and installation cost – not the bullshit number you give to the Dispatch and the UAC to make yourself feel less moronic and self indulgent.

    But of course, my calculations ignore the wonderful feeling of doing something visionary for everyone to be impressed about.

    #474044

    groundrules
    Participant

    You’ve done an excellent job researching how to be a dick.

    #474045
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    howatzer said:
    and the picture above suggests a vertical, not horizontal (i.e. rockmastermike’s google favorite), turbine, so something like this or similar:

    quietrevolution qr5 turbine

    Dimenisions look about right, too.

    According to the company’s website, this unit generates about 4200 kWh for 1 year at an average wind speed of 5 m/s. Columbus’s average windspeed is more like 4 m/s, so say 3400 kWh per year. At the current $0.07 per kWh, that’s about $240 of energy generated per year.

    So it would take about 85 years to make your $20K investment back, longer if you include maintenance and the actual purchase and installation cost – not the bullshit number you give to the Dispatch and the UAC to make yourself feel less moronic and self indulgent.

    But of course, my calculations ignore the wonderful feeling of doing something visionary for everyone to be impressed about.

    Well said.

    #474046

    Rockmastermike
    Participant

    howatzer said:
    Wow. “Math” done in the style of a true geologist.

    The energy capacity of the battery does not equal the charging rate. To calculate that you would need the voltage. I’m assuming the generator will be on a 120v = 8 hours for a charge (assuming it’s windy). If it’s 240, then you could get down 4 hours (assuming it’s windy).

    What I like about geologists is they know a little about a lot of things. What I don’t like is that they pretend to know a lot.

    the charging voltage (as stated for the chevy chargestation) is 240 and it draws about 7 kw in use. So yeah, 4 hours with a 10kw turbine (which is a guess based on the biggest turbine it looks like that pole can handle), exactly as I said. You think I wouldn’t have noticed that? Yes I know you have to use a transformer to get that voltage, whatever, you have to do that to plug it into your house too so that’s assumed. On standard 120v it takes ~10 hours no matter what your power is (according to chevy), so a 5kw turbine for an overnight charge… as I said.

    The point is moot since odds are he’s NOT USING IT FOR THAT ANYWAY. He’s probably just using it to take the edge off some of his power bills.

    so yeah, I do happen to know a lot of things. So why don’t you take your smug-ass attitude and go pound it with sand. If you wanna know where you can get some really nice sand, I can tell you that too. I shan’t read or reply to anything else you post on this site you jackwaggon so don’t bother responding.

    #474047

    Rockmastermike
    Participant

    rus said:
    Well said.

    its a guess based on a picture. I would assume a larger unit, ’cause it would make more sense. But even if it IS that small unit, their lower operating estimate of 4000 kwh is fully half of what my household uses in a year.

    #474048
    hugh59
    hugh59
    Participant

    Is it 7 cents per KWH or 13 cents? There are various assorted monthly fees added to one’s electric bill. I find that assuming 3 cents per KWH gives me a good estimate of what my final bill will be.

    So, if he is generating 3400 KWH per year then he is saving $442 per year. Assuming you are correct with the $20K price, it would only take him 45.25 years to pay off the investments. The next question is, what is the expected life of the unit and the maintenance costs associated with it.

    #474049

    Rockmastermike
    Participant

    hugh59 said:
    Is it 7 cents per kWh or 13 cents? There are various assorted monthly fees added to one’s electric bill. I find that assuming 3 cents per kWh gives me a good estimate of what my final bill will be.

    dividing dollars/kwh on my last bill says 12cents and change. The fees and stuff included. I guess some of those fees are more fixed than others and dont change much or at all based on your usage, but that’s the number I get.

    The thing is, what do WE care if he breaks even or not? If he’s made the calculation and thinks that he can save money or is betting (safe bet) that electricity will not stay this cheap then that’s a bet he’s taking. People can say he’s making a bad bet but making up scare stories and calling him a hypocrite (as some have done) is pretty asinine and downright uncalled for.

    Or perhaps he just doesn’t like giving money to AEP for his own reasons and doesn’t CARE what anyone else thinks. I’m with him on that one.

    #474050

    pedex
    Participant

    hugh59 said:
    Is it 7 cents per kWh or 13 cents? There are various assorted monthly fees added to one’s electric bill. I find that assuming 3 cents per kWh gives me a good estimate of what my final bill will be.

    depends on your schedule/service

    based on aep’s website(if I am reading it right) at the single family home rate its about 7 cents per kwhr until 1000kwhrs at which point it drops to 3 cents per kwhr……….two tiered billing, plus service charges of course

    looks like they have 17 schedules between general service and bundled service

    #474051

    Rockmastermike
    Participant

    pedex said:
    depends on your schedule/service

    based on aep’s website(if I am reading it right) at the single family home rate its about 7 cents per kwhr until 1000kwhrs at which point it drops to 3 cents per kwhr……….two tiered billing, plus service charges of course

    looks like they have 17 schedules between general service and bundled service

    This is something I’ve been wondering about for a while, actually. I’m pretty sure those numbers are for comparing with another power company, so they they’ve been allowed by PUCO to not count some of the fees which would be the same from company to company in their rate quotes. I think, based on just dividing useage and money and getting 12+cents is that comparing it to generating your own power would be a rather different fee schedule.

    Anyone who works for AEP wanna clear this up?

    #474052

    pedex
    Participant

    Rockmastermike said:
    the thing is, I’m pretty sure those numbers are for comparing with another power company, so they they’ve been allowed by PUCO to not count some of the fees which would be the same from company to company in their rate quotes. I think, based on just dividing useage by money and getting 12+cents is that comparing it to generating your own power would be a rather different fee schedule.

    Anyone who works for AEP wanna clear this up?

    I think the other fee part is in the tariff schedules which is the other spreadsheet file below the rate schedules.

    electric is billed in two parts at least that’s my understanding, part of it is your actual consumption and the other is related to the other costs involved

    dunno about aep but some like city electric also charge you a flat fee just for being connected too which adds up cause at $7 a month when you only use $20 worth of juice its a big part of the bill

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