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Why Millennials Don't Want To Buy Stuff

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Why Millennials Don't Want To Buy Stuff

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Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 150 total)
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  • #505297

    ricospaz
    Participant

    Most popular name 2047. Boy: Hal Girl: Pris

    #505298

    TaraK
    Participant

    Choices that a lot of younger folks make that seem “poor” to older folks/their parents’ generation:

    – cutting off cable
    – one car households
    – biking or walking anywhere
    – not putting a TV in every room
    – smaller spaces
    – fewer kids / no kids

    Choices that a lot of younger folks make that seem “overly spendy” to older folks/their parents’ generation:

    – $1k+ Macbook
    – updated smartphones
    – organic food anything
    – flying over driving
    – leisure travel
    – select grocery stores (Whole Foods and the like) or local/foodie-foods
    – everything on Fab.com

    #505299

    gramarye
    Participant

    ricospaz said:
    Most popular name 2047. Boy: Hal Girl: Pris

    Because Siri will sound like just an old lady’s name by then.

    TaraK said:
    Choices that a lot of younger folks make that seem “poor” to older folks/their parents’ generation:

    – cutting off cable
    – one car households
    – biking or walking anywhere
    – not putting a TV in every room
    – smaller spaces
    – fewer kids / no kids

    Choices that a lot of younger folks make that seem “overly spendy” to older folks/their parents’ generation:

    – $1k+ Macbook
    – updated smartphones
    – organic food anything
    – flying over driving
    – leisure travel
    – select grocery stores (Whole Foods and the like) or local/foodie-foods
    – everything on Fab.com

    And one that potentially goes into both categories is the decision to rent rather than own. It makes them seem poor because everyone knows that poor people rent and middle- and upper-class people own, and everyone also knows that you’re losing the chance to build wealth.

    Of course, just because everyone knows it doesn’t make it true.

    #505300

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    Well, if cable programming wasn’t mostly hillbilly stuff now maybe I’d still have it.

    #505301
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    Foolishness.

    Millennials love to spend money. Trust me. I have two of them. Every generation thinks they are different, but they are not. I was twenty five once. Student loans, rented an apartment, did not have cash. Not breaking new ground here. That is the time of your life when you have no money. This is normal. Pay off some bills, establish some credit, hang out with your single friends, yada yada yada. Then later you have a kid and you seem to move up a generation from that. Then they are teenagers and you read on an internet message board about how different it is now than when you were twenty five. It aint.

    #505302

    mrpoppinzs
    Member

    ^ that comment made my day.

    #505303

    dubdave00
    Participant

    derm said:
    Millennials love to spend money. Trust me. I have two of them. Every generation thinks they are different, but they are not. I was twenty five once. Student loans, rented an apartment, did not have cash. Not breaking new ground here. That is the time of your life when you have no money. This is normal. Pay off some bills, establish some credit, hang out with your single friends, yada yada yada. Then later you have a kid and you seem to move up a generation from that. Then they are teenagers and you read on an internet message board about how different it is now than when you were twenty five. It aint.

    I love it too. This seems relevant:
    “I used to be with it, but then they changed what ‘it’ was. Now, what I’m with isn’t it, and what’s ‘it’ seems weird and scary to me. It’ll happen to you…” ;-)

    #505304

    mrpoppinzs
    Member

    I don’t think he is saying it is weird and scary to him though. He is just giving them the age old ‘knowing nod’ that he was once them and they will be him someday.

    #505305

    SpottieOttie
    Member

    I recently read this article.

    It says, “Four out of 5 U.S. adults struggle with joblessness, near-poverty or reliance on welfare for at least parts of their lives, a sign of deteriorating economic security and an elusive American dream.”

    At the age of 28, I work full time, I have a degree, and yet nearly EVERY day I struggle to simply eat and have enough gas to get back to work. I would LOVE to spend money, but with staggering student loan debt, (private loans – my parents were middle class school teachers in 2003 when I came to OSU – so I did not qaulify for federal loans and grants, despite the fact that with four kids my parents could not afford to save for my college education) zero savings, and Obama’s first term tax cut ending in January – I find myself more poor than ever.

    Not only that – but I am bringing my parents down with me. They cosigned my loans – and now no one will consolidate them, and I can’t claim bankruptcy for them (+$100,000) because halfway through my college experience – 2007 I believe – Bush made it officially NOT allowed. Heck – I can’t even negotiate a payment lower than $1K a month. My father tries to help make these payments, because if he doesn’t – they will take his house. That monthly payment is literally half of my income!

    Sorry for the rant. But I would love to buy some shoes (I have one functional pair). I would love to afford the finer (healthier) groceries like olive oil, fish, and organic vegetables. Going to concerts, buying clothes, taking a vacation!? Oh it would be so sweet…

    #505306

    SpottieOttie
    Member

    I found my favorite editorial cartoon depicting the struggle.

    #505307

    TaraK
    Participant

    derm said:
    Foolishness.

    That is the time of your life when you have no money. This is normal. Pay off some bills, establish some credit, hang out with your single friends, yada yada yada. Then later you have a kid and you seem to move up a generation from that. Then they are teenagers and you read on an internet message board about how different it is now than when you were twenty five. It aint.

    What amount of money qualifies as “having no money?” What perspective is that written from? I’ve had more annual income than my parents or grandparents since 21. Not because I was a brilliant FB founder, but because I had a degree and an average paying job. And I wouldn’t say my parents have/had “no money” either.

    I think we tell young people making some money that they’re not making anything, which implies it’s just enough to get by or live on. I think it’s some vaguely middle class definition of what “having money” is. But then we all know folks who make good incomes that “have no money” due to their spending/lifestyles, right?

    I know they have bills and loans and lower incomes than older folks, but why do we assume people under 35 “have no money”?

    #505308
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    derm said:
    Every generation thinks they are different, but they are not.

    While you’re correct that there are certainly lifecycle/lifestyle changes that are consistent across all generations, the big variables are the external factors at play that vary from decade to decade and generation to generation. Being a young person in the 50s is different than being a young person in the 80s, which is different than being a young person in the 2010s. The economy can be up or down, national and global politics can change attitudes and cultures, and of course things are much much different for young minorities of all types across those different eras.

    #505309

    maveric1
    Participant

    Walker said:
    While you’re correct that there are certainly lifecycle/lifestyle changes that are consistent across all generations, the big variables are the external factors at play that vary from decade to decade and generation to generation. Being a young person in the 50s is different than being a young person in the 80s, which is different than being a young person in the 2010s. The economy can be up or down, national and global politics can change attitudes and cultures, and of course things are much much different for young minorities of all types across those different eras.

    Correct but changes in situations between generation is the constant. Greatest Generation’s situation was different from Baby Boomers and to the Gen X.

    Situations will change but eventually, as a whole, they get to the same place as Derm stated.

    #505310
    Not that Tom
    Not that Tom
    Participant

    I think the point is that Millenials aren’t interested in certain “stuff” that prior generations valued.

    Speaking as a Millenial myself, the “stuff” includes:

    -dryer
    -cable
    -new car
    -desktop PC / lap top (ipad does the job)
    -more than one set of new clothes / year

    I aim to consume “experience” over “materials”

    (e.g. bars, concerts, trips, food)

    #505311

    InnerCore
    Participant

    Not that Tom said:
    I think the point is that Millenials aren’t interested in certain “stuff” that prior generations valued.

    Speaking as a Millenial myself, the “stuff” includes:

    -dryer
    -cable
    -new car
    -desktop PC / lap top (ipad does the job)
    -more than one set of new clothes / year

    I aim to consume “experience” over “materials”

    (e.g. bars, concerts, trips, food)

    And apparently people are taking notice and marketing differently to millenials based on these observations:

    Esentially we know you’re living in a more urban area and dinning, bars, concerts, etc are more important that having an expensive car that you drive less anyway.

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