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White City:The new urban blight is rich people

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion White City:The new urban blight is rich people

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 84 total)
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  • #1121012
    lazyfish
    lazyfish
    Participant

    New Urbanist city an “adult Disneyland with plenty of civic restaurants, shops and festivals,” a place blissfully removed from reality, except perhaps in the persistence of the homeless “problem….. There is really only one strike against the New Urbanism, but it’s a strike thrown by Nolan Ryan: It turns cities into playgrounds for moneyed, childless whites while pushing out the poor, the working-class, immigrants, seniors and anyone else not plugged into “the knowledge economy.” Right around the time that Michael Bloomberg was remaking Manhattan as a hive for stateless billionaires, I saw a slogan that captured perfectly the new glimmer of the city: “New York: If you can make it here, you probably have a trust fund.”

    http://www.rawstory.com/2016/04/white-city-the-new-urban-blight-is-rich-people/

    #1121013
    lazyfish
    lazyfish
    Participant

    America’s urban renaissance is only for the rich

    The top 20 percent of the population has become a lot more likely to live in a high-density urban neighborhood, and the next 20 percent is somewhat more likely. But the bottom 60 percent — and especially the bottom 10 percent — have become far less urbanized.

    http://www.vox.com/2016/3/30/11331938/class-urban-revival-kolko

    #1121020
    King Gambrinus
    King Gambrinus
    Participant

    Sorry people are investing money in cities again? It’s pretty much terrible.

    #1121021
    papillon
    papillon
    Participant

    How I wish the biggest problem with my neighborhood was too many rich people :(

    #1121028
    Jason Powell
    Jason Powell
    Participant

    To me, an urban renaissance is only successful if everyone has a chance to share in that success. That, so far, has not been the case. Say what you want, but middle and lower incomes are being shut out from this new “luxury” lifestyle due primarily to rents. Just imagine what our urban areas would look like if both of these classes were more easily integrated. (I know, it’s easier said than done. I get it) It’s just another form of class/economic segregation. The only time you get an idea of what a city would look like at maximum integration is during a festival – while walking through the Short North, one can see just about every race and economic class. On any normal day, this is not the case and never will be with current city planning trends/policies (or a lack thereof), politics and general lack of concern for middle and lower income folks, all of which are dictating our inner core neighborhood development.

    It needs to be a more balanced approach, and, right now, it’s pretty one-sided.

    #1121029
    Snarf
    Snarf
    Participant

    I feel zero guilt for being a moneyed childless white living in the city.

    #1121033

    CB_downtowner
    Participant

    To me, an urban renaissance is only successful if everyone has a chance to share in that success. That, so far, has not been the case. Say what you want, but middle and lower incomes are being shut out from this new “luxury” lifestyle due primarily to rents. Just imagine what our urban areas would look like if both of these classes were more easily integrated. (I know, it’s easier said than done. I get it) It’s just another form of class/economic segregation. The only time you get an idea of what a city would look like at maximum integration is during a festival – while walking through the Short North, one can see just about every race and economic class. On any normal day, this is not the case and never will be with current city planning trends/policies (or a lack thereof), politics and general lack of concern for middle and lower income folks, all of which are dictating our inner core neighborhood development.

    It needs to be a more balanced approach, and, right now, it’s pretty one-sided.

    I would agree. I’m not going to “go there” with some of the implications in the original article posted. But Columbus has to do a much better job at offering affordable housing downtown. Not only does lack of diversity hurt the interesting options we can and should offer for retail. It also really hurts density and attracts residents who won’t part with their cars. I am really, really hoping they don’t duff this one in Franklinton because the character of that neighborhood would be terrific for finally helping bridge that gap a little.

    #1121065

    hometown
    Participant

    When we bought our house in Victorian Village in 1984, the property taxes were 300 dollars a year. They are now close to 7,000. Nearly all of our original black homeowner neighbors have sold off their houses and moved away. The area is now a mix of young folk stuffed into ill kept investor property or people who are capable of buying a condo for half a million dollars. Both groups are nearly all white. As a person of adequate but comparatively modest means, I am now what passes for local color.

    #1121066

    wpcc88
    Participant

    I’m only white, certainly not wealthy and live in Italian Village… every one of my neighbors is a “minority” whether it is age, race or creed. We even have two families living behind and across the street from us, I don’t think Cbus is as bad as everyone makes it seem.

    #1121069

    OneBagTravel
    Participant

    Oh the eternal sin of being white… Can’t move into poor urban neighborhoods without gentrifying, can’t move to the white suburbs without being racist.

    #1121070
    lazyfish
    lazyfish
    Participant

    Oh the eternal sin of being white… Can’t move into poor urban neighborhoods without gentrifying, can’t move to the white suburbs without being racist.

    white being a social construct, it is more an attitude of privilege and entitlement, Snarf’s got it right, no guilt, remorse or perspective. Time begins when you bought into the neighborhood. The irony is that many early folks bought into neighborhoods because they were diverse and non homogenized, now the worm has turned and the suburban folks we ran away from have found us and reblanded the neighborhood.

    CB_downtowner: I suspect E. Franklinton is doomed to be gentrified if you see who is buying the large tracts of land and the fact that it is pretty wide open and empty. It will be interesting if CMHA sells their holdings to developers before building low income housing, but I suspect that land will be Bollingered.

    #1121109
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    So the preferred alternative is for rich white people to only live in the suburbs, and poor non-whites to only live in the cities?

    That’s not an improvement.

    #1121112
    Snarf
    Snarf
    Participant

    East Franklinton will look like what’s happening in Italian Village in no time.

    #1121123
    lazyfish
    lazyfish
    Participant

    So the preferred alternative is for rich white people to only live in the suburbs, and poor non-whites to only live in the cities?

    That’s not an improvement.

    no it is for a more equitable and diverse culture, less enclaves more inclusion…ending tax abatements downtown and the SN for high end housing…if you can pay 400 K+ for a condo you can pay your property taxes. Educating the rich newbies to accept dark skinned folks, poor folks and some level of nuisance, no parking, petty crime, litter, poor maintenance by the city…when rich folk buy into a neighborhood they buy in with money not mindset, that needs to change first.

    #1121128
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    when rich folk buy into a neighborhood they buy in with money not mindset, that needs to change first.

    Well, I can’t imagine that casting stereotypes against a group of people is a great way to start.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 84 total)

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