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Columbus Bike Lanes — News, Updates & Discussion

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Transportation Columbus Bike Lanes — News, Updates & Discussion

Viewing 15 posts - 256 through 270 (of 276 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #1097624
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    …the rush has been oppressive

    Like how oppressive? An extra five or ten minutes on the commute between 5pm and 6pm?

    #1097626

    ohbr
    Participant

    After a couple months of prep, the speed at which Summit and fourth are getting paved and painted is impressive. Won’t be long now, and with the Hudson st bridge opening again this weekend, traffic will be so much better, for bicyclists too!

    #1097636
    lazyfish
    lazyfish
    Participant

    Walker, more like 45 minutes

    #1097702

    Mike88
    Participant

    People are driving like loons on 4th around the new two lanes and bike lanes.
    I’ve seen cars driving down the parking sections, all over the bike lanes and trying to make their own third lane. They desperately need to get the street markings and some new signage down. I shudder to think if I was on my bike what that ride would look like.

    Hopefully these clowns get it together and realize what’s going on and soon.

    #1097727
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Walker, more like 45 minutes

    Not that I’m calling you a liar or anything… but I find this hard to believe.

    #1097729
    Gus W
    Gus W
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>lazyfish wrote:</div>
    Walker, more like 45 minutes

    Not that I’m calling you a liar or anything… but I find this hard to believe.

    I don’t know about 45 minutes, but like Mike88 said, it’s a mess around there at the moment. There’s going to be an accident coming off 670 at the 4th St exit if there hasn’t already.

    #1097732

    ohbr
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>lazyfish wrote:</div>
    Walker, more like 45 minutes

    Not that I’m calling you a liar or anything… but I find this hard to believe.

    I believe it. It’s taken me that long to go from downtown to Hudson plenty of times before even when there wasn’t construction on 4th, Summit, Hudson, 5th, and so on. (I no longer work downtown) Just depends on where the accidents are, especially when 670 and 71 are jammed, 4th and Summit become bombarded with everyone pouring off the highways. But that will always be an issue. Can’t really help that. I do imagine this last week and next week will be a consistently stressful commute. Fortunately, Hudson Bridge opens this weekend and Summit and 4th will be finished in the next week or two getting people back to their standard commute, or slightly modified with the reduction in lanes in portions. I don’t anticipate a significant change in commute times with one less lane having driven that for several years.

    Now, just wait for next summer when Indianola is shut down both directions for 6 months over the Glen Echo Ravine…. That will be alot of fun!

    #1097735
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    It’s taken me that long to go from downtown to Hudson plenty of times before even when there wasn’t construction on 4th, Summit, Hudson, 5th, and so on.

    I guess everyone has different experiences then. I’ve driven from Downtown to Summit thousands of times, and can’t recall it ever taking more than 20 minutes in the heaviest traffic.

    Good thing there are alternative routes I guess.

    #1097751

    ehill27
    Participant

    Outside of a day there was an accident this week, I haven’t noticed ANY difference in traffic on 4th around 5:30pm. And that’s particularly impressive considering the road is still under construction.

    #1110103

    CommonSense2
    Participant

    I drive regularly on Summit Street and N. 4th Street and most of the time there are no bicycles on the road. It seems crazy to have eliminated one lane of traffic which is constant for the occasional bike rider. And when bike riders were there before the dedicated line there did not seem to be problems for them.

    I think we have lost common sense in our city planning.

    #1110127

    sruckus
    Participant

    Umm, it’s winter??

    And I have walked down Summit/Fourth before not during rush hour and there were barely any cars!! By that same logic maybe they should get rid of another lane!

    #1110213

    mbeaumont
    Participant

    I drive regularly on Summit Street and N. 4th Street and most of the time there are no bicycles on the road. It seems crazy to have eliminated one lane of traffic which is constant for the occasional bike rider. And when bike riders were there before the dedicated line there did not seem to be problems for them.

    I think we have lost common sense in our city planning.

    Your username is really ironic at the moment.

    #1110229
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    On a related note, there’s a very interesting study rehashed recently, which breaks down the population into four groups of cyclists:

    • strong and fearless
    • enthused and confident
    • interested but concerned
    • no way no how

    The first two groups are the ones who are more apt to cycle, regardless of infrastructure. They’re also both very small demographic, making up less than 15% of the population, combined.

    The last group are the people who will never cycle, ever. No amount of infrastructure will get them to do it. They’re about 30% of the population.

    That means that the largest demographic (55% of people) fall into the “Interested but Concerned” group. They’re the ones who would consider making trips by bike with the right kind of infrastructure in place. They’re the reason you see no one riding bikes on city streets prior to new infrastructure going in, and the reason you see a lot more people on bikes once the infrastructure has arrived.

    That being said, no two types of infrastructure are the same, and the article breaks this down.

    Sharrows are the least effective, albeit the cheapest and quickest to implement. The comfort levels rise and concerns are addressed with that “Interested but Concerned” group when protected lanes go in, but still aren’t as effective as bike boulevards and bike trails/paths. Of course, these are more expensive to implement, and while bike trails rank the best, they’re not a feasible solution for all types of routes in a city.

    The full article is worth a read if you have time: http://www.citylab.com/commute/2016/01/the-4-types-of-cyclists-youll-meet-on-us-city-streets/422787/

    TL:DR version — “Build it (right) and a they will come.”

    #1110746
    lazyfish
    lazyfish
    Participant
    #1110770

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    http://allcolumbusdata.com/?p=4760

    Very much a work in progress to say the least, but I am making a Google Map of all of the Columbus metro’s biking infrastructure. Most of the current maps are either outdated or only include individual cities, so I am making one to include all areas for both current and future conditions.

Viewing 15 posts - 256 through 270 (of 276 total)

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