Our City Online

Messageboard - Development

NOTE: You are viewing an archived version of the Columbus Underground forums/messageboard. As of 05/22/16 they have been closed to new comments and replies, but will remain accessible for archived searches and reference. For more information CLICK HERE

Where (in/near downtown) can I build a small, modern home?

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Development Where (in/near downtown) can I build a small, modern home?

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 64 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #528535

    James
    Participant

    A house as you’ve described would be difficult to finance with a conventional mortgage. Banks lend based on appraised value of the finished structure. Since nobody builds or buys micro-houses it would likely appraise it with a very low value. You’d be looking at either paying for it outright or financing only a very small percentage of construction costs. It would also be a challenge finding a reputable (qualified) builder who could build for anywhere near such a low price. Prefab I don’t know much about, but the few nice, modern prefab manufacturers I’ve seen are much more expensive than you’d think, and that doesn’t include lot, foundation, installation, finishing or utilities.

    #528536

    cbus11
    Member

    I would recommend the ‘buying a condo downtown’ route also. Even small things such as curb cuts for possible parking could be an issue depending on where you build.

    #528537
    Chris Sherman
    Chris Sherman
    Participant

    That’s

    Pablo said:
    I have no idea as to actual costs, that makes sense that single connections would cost more than a new subdivision. Lets say you buy a distressed property and knock down the building and build a modern structure – would you have to pay tap fees or can you just use what’s there and pay for the inspection?

    That’s a good question although alot of the older homes have ancient connections and curb stops, depending the type of financing or project, new taps and rysers may be required. last summer a curb stop erupted on McDowell near rich street where a house use to stand now vacant lot. it must have ran for days… I’m not sure where it’s terminated either. The sidewalks were not disturbed so I’m going to assume the line was cut at the foundation and simply buried wide open with the curb stop valve closed. Seems like an issue to me but who knows.

    #528538
    Caleb
    Caleb
    Participant

    May I suggestion Franklinton? Id could use a spur of development and I am sure that there are some empty lots around.

    #528539

    StateofDevotion
    Participant

    If you can find a distressed property with existing structure and/or utilities you will save a lot. I did that and it was literally a matter of shutting off the water, gas, electric and capping the sewer during recycling and construction. Afterwards the plumber and electrician reconnected them and I started service up again. I would think there are a lot of opportunities in FTON for that.

    #528540
    Steve
    Steve
    Participant

    These are all great suggestions and great information…

    To be honest, I really didn’t know there was so much involved and that it was so difficult to build new properties in areas in and around downtown… I guess it makes sense, in the end.

    Franklinton is a very affordable option, and becoming moreso a possibility.

    A lot of this information here is pushing me more toward buying a condo downtown, after more are completed.

    I will most likely continue to rent at my current place, and wait for some condos. ;)

    #528541
    Snarf
    Snarf
    Participant

    Anyone have a line on any modern treehouses, something with a space unicorn dock preferably?

    #528542

    ricospaz
    Participant

    It cost me $5000 just to replace my sewer line recently.

    #528543
    Josh Lapp
    Josh Lapp
    Participant

    http://www.10tv.com/content/stories/2012/12/27/columbus-downsizing-homes.html

    Home Downsizing Leading To Unique Housing Options
    A growing trend in the south and west has begun to catch on in central Ohio.

    Downsizing during the recession has led to an uptick in a unique – and tiny – kind of home.

    David Barker has helped architect Alex Melamed build his dream home in Yellow Springs.

    His dream is big, but the home is small.

    “This is a 300-square-foot house,” said Melamed. “It’s less to deal with, less to pay a mortgage on, less to clean.”

    #528544
    Steve
    Steve
    Participant

    joshlapp said:
    http://www.10tv.com/content/stories/2012/12/27/columbus-downsizing-homes.html

    Home Downsizing Leading To Unique Housing Options
    A growing trend in the south and west has begun to catch on in central Ohio.

    Downsizing during the recession has led to an uptick in a unique – and tiny – kind of home.

    David Barker has helped architect Alex Melamed build his dream home in Yellow Springs.

    His dream is big, but the home is small.

    “This is a 300-square-foot house,” said Melamed. “It’s less to deal with, less to pay a mortgage on, less to clean.”

    Thanks for sharing!

    I think I’ve decided to wait until it’s a little easier to get this done… I think I’m going to rent for a couple more years.

    #528545
    lazyfish
    lazyfish
    Participant

    How much is Wagenbrenner selling lots for in WP?

    #528546

    christylwilliams
    Participant

    I’m a little late to the conversation, but just to clarify, there are no historical restrictions required in OTE, UNLESS you live on Bryden Rd. So you can build anything you want as long as it meets code, etc.

    #528547
    Josh Lapp
    Josh Lapp
    Participant

    christylwilliams said:
    I’m a little late to the conversation, but just to clarify, there are no historical restrictions required in OTE, UNLESS you live on Bryden Rd. So you can build anything you want as long as it meets code, etc.

    But most requests still must go to NEAC for approval before the zoning changes are approved by the BZA.

    #528548

    christylwilliams
    Participant

    joshlapp said:
    But most requests still must go to NEAC for approval before the zoning changes are approved by the BZA.

    Are OTE’s zoning restrictions unique from other neighborhoods because of NEAC’s presence? I’ve always wondered about that.

    #528549
    Josh Lapp
    Josh Lapp
    Participant

    christylwilliams said:
    Are OTE’s zoning restrictions unique from other neighborhoods because of NEAC’s presence? I’ve always wondered about that.

    No, but I believe its the typical policy of NEAC (and many other commissions) to be in favor of whatever the historic land use for each property was.

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 64 total)

The forum ‘Development’ is closed to new topics and replies.

Subscribe below: