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Urban Highway Removal

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Transportation Urban Highway Removal

Viewing 8 posts - 61 through 68 (of 68 total)
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  • #483367

    News
    Participant

    New Report: Tearing Down the Gardiner is Our Best Bet
    FEBRUARY 5, 2014 AT 5:42 PM

    Tear it down. That’s the upshot of a new report examining the long-term future of the 2.4 kilometre stretch of the Gardiner Expressway that runs east of Jarvis.

    That report is part of a full environmental assessment, necessary because the roadway is crumbling and soon won’t be safe to drive on, or under. The four options that are on the table: maintain the roadway as-is and undertake massive repairs to ensure it is safe; keep the Gardiner but try to improve its aesthetics and the ways it interacts with the public realm; replace it with a new roadway; and remove it altogether.

    READ MORE: http://torontoist.com/2014/02/new-report-tearing-down-the-gardiner-is-our-best-bet/

    #483368

    Pablo
    Participant

    The Future of Urban Freeways Is Playing Out Right Now in Syracuse
    AMY CRAWFORD

    SYRACUSE, N.Y.—When Van Robinson moved from New York to Syracuse in 1968, one of the first things he noticed was Interstate 81, which runs along a 1.4-mile viaduct straight through the city’s downtown. “I thought, ‘This is ridiculous. Who in the world would put an interstate through the middle of a city?'” says Robinson. “I-81 is 855 miles from Knoxville, Tennessee, to the Canadian border. This is the only place where it goes through a city. It always bugged me.”

    Forty-six years later, Robinson now serves as president of Syracuse’s Common Council and may finally be in a position to do something about the elevated highway that he has described as a “Berlin Wall” dividing the city’s neighborhoods. The I-81 viaduct will reach the end of its functional life in 2017, and the New York State Department of Transportation has decided that it is not worth the cost of rehabilitation. One way or another, the viaduct is coming down.

    READ MORE: http://www.theatlanticcities.com/commute/2014/02/future-urban-freeways-playing-out-right-now-syracuse/8419/

    #483369

    News
    Participant

    Let’s Bury I-5
    Posted on February 17, 2014

    When President Eisenhower envisioned a great road system connecting the far-flung cities of the U.S. he didn’t quite expect the engineers to plow through whole neighborhoods. But that’s what happened, and the legacy is the concrete ribbons that divide our cities to this day. An example is right here in Seattle with Interstate 5 running north to Shoreline and south to Tukwila for about 16 miles, dividing Downtown from First Hill, Capitol Hill from South Lake Union, and the U-District from Wallingford. Amid population growth and demand for residential and commercial development, now is the time to reclaim valuable land while mitigating a significant disturbance to urban life.

    READ MORE: https://northwesturbanist.wordpress.com/2014/02/17/lets-bury-i-5/

    #575001

    News
    Participant

    Mar 3, 2014
    Highway Down?
    Martin C. Pedersen

    http://metropolismag.com/images/cache/cache_b/cache_3/cache_1/b316066a1e10f70415556dd1fa1e1ecd.jpeg?ver=1393853829&aspectratio=1.7808219178082

    The Congress for the New Urbanism (CNU) recently posted its biennial agenda entitled “Freeways Without a Future.” It’s the CNU’s top ten list of inner city highways that the group believes are ripe for decommissioning. Topping this year’s list was the Claiborne Avenue stretch of I-10 in New Orleans, an elevated road that separates the historic neighborhoods of Treme and the French Quarter.

    READ MORE: http://www.metropolismag.com/Point-of-View/March-2014/Highway-Down/

    #1086498

    News
    Participant

    Knock ’em down
    By BEN FRIED

    Dwight D. Eisenhower didn’t like the way America’s interstate highway system turned out. The interstates, as he saw it, were supposed to create connections between different cities, not gouge paths through the middle of them. But by the time his presidency came to an end in 1960, huge highways and overpasses had obliterated thickly settled urban areas, uprooting families and dividing neighborhoods, all paid for with federal money. Eisenhower was aghast.

    READ MORE: http://www.politico.com/agenda/story/2015/07/infrastructure-highway-funds-strategy-000166

    #1104738

    News
    Participant

    Highways Destroyed America’s Cities
    Can tearing them down bring revitalization?
    ALANA SEMUELS NOV 25, 2015 BUSINESS

    America loves its freeways. After the 1956 Federal Highway Bill created the pathway for a 41,000 mile interstate highway system, states and cities jockeyed for the funding to build ever-more extensive networks of pavement that could carry Americans quickly between cities. Sometimes, they built these highways right in the middle of cities, displacing communities and razing old buildings and homes.

    READ MORE: http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2015/11/highways-destroyed-americas-cities/417789/

    #1104884

    Ned23
    Participant

    I’m always amazed at how much space highways take up in the middle of cities. Downtown Columbus is basically an island cut-off from the rest of the city by freeways. Seeing where 670 cut through IV is pretty sad. The interchange of 670 and 71 alone basically consumes the space equivalent of the entire downtown of a typical ~50,000-100,000 population city.

    #1104909
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    I’m always amazed at how much space highways take up in the middle of cities. Downtown Columbus is basically an island cut-off from the rest of the city by freeways. Seeing where 670 cut through IV is pretty sad. The interchange of 670 and 71 alone basically consumes the space equivalent of the entire downtown of a typical ~50,000-100,000 population city.

    Yep, we lost an entire neighborhood mostly to 670…

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flytown

Viewing 8 posts - 61 through 68 (of 68 total)

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