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What is Walkability?

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion What is Walkability?

Viewing 11 posts - 16 through 26 (of 26 total)
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  • #1106214

    sruckus
    Participant

    I want more takeout food options in the Short North. Could be expanded menu options at our local restaurants or a couple of delicatessens or a modern/upscale version of UDF. Sometime you don’t feel like going “out” to eat, but don’t feel like cooking either. Picking a restaurant gets really painful with visiting friends and family and you have preschoolers and/or grandparents in the mix.

    This is very true. I get lazy sometimes and feel like my only options are Chipotle and now luckily Brassica for something quick to grab! Or pizza, of course.

    #1106220

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    Years ago I saw an interview with an urban planner who said one important element in making a cityscape pedestrian-friendly is simply providing places to sit down, like benches designed into building frontage.

    #1106225

    Nancy H
    Participant

    Years ago I saw an interview with an urban planner who said one important element in making a cityscape pedestrian-friendly is simply providing places to sit down, like benches designed into building frontage.

    Not sure about other neighborhoods, but in the Short North, any place where one can sit down is usually occupied by a panhandler.

    #1106231
    Posole
    Posole
    Participant

    Panhandlers don’t bother me. I ask them if they take credit cards, because I don’t really carry cash anymore. Seriously, I have zero cash on me at the moment. The only thing I really get cash out for anymore is food trucks.

    #1106233

    clancy12
    Participant

    So? Aren’t panhandlers people too? Or must they be moved out of your view?

    #1106235

    clancy12
    Participant

    Walkability means different things to different people. For me, it is the ability to walk to useful businesses– for me useful is the grocery store, the library, a drugstore, maybe a hardware store. Restaurants are not that important to me.
    I think when our city planners are talking about “walkability” they mean the things that well to do empty nesters/retirees want– restaurants, bars, high end shops. After all, for all the talk of millenials, lets face it most of the developments going up are aimed at a higher income group and that is definitely older people. Millenials serve more of a purpose in attracting this older cohort which does not want to seem old.

    #1106236
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    After all, for all the talk of millenials, lets face it most of the developments going up are aimed at a higher income group and that is definitely older people.

    In related news…

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/more-than-half-of-us-renters-older-than-40-study-says/2015/12/09/011fe744-9e33-11e5-9ad2-568d814bbf3b_story.html

    #1106240
    Ned23
    Ned23
    Participant

    Just having sidewalks would make parts of Clintonville more walkable

    #1106249

    stein
    Participant

    In related news…

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/more-than-half-of-us-renters-older-than-40-study-says/2015/12/09/011fe744-9e33-11e5-9ad2-568d814bbf3b_story.html

    Kind of odd, you would think the headline stat from that article would be the 25% increase in renting households since 2005 rather than the 4% increase in households with people over 40 among those renting (which kind of seems to be about aging demographics rather than any change in boomer/gen x preferences), but thats just me. Also kind of wish they had included more about the percentage increase in single family homes that were rentals and not owner-occupied.

    The other thing that I wish they had gotten into more was whether the new construction at the top end rentals were targeting/pulling renters from slightly older, previously top end buildings in the same general area or people who had previously lived in single family homes. It stands to reason that if its the former in an area, then it probably is opening up more affordable rentals a little further down the chain. if its the latter, then you need much more construction to actually put downward pressure on rents, or even hold them steady.

    In general, I would expect emptynesters to have a net migration into urban areas. partially because they dont need so much space, partially because of better amenities (that aren’t child-focused), and partially because thats where their kids are.

    #1106262

    clancy12
    Participant

    I didn’t know whether to laugh or cry when I read about the “road diet” for Indianola in Clintonville. The sidewalks are in awful shape there and they are almost useless for someone with impaired mobility– and totally useless if you depend on a wheelchair. Lets fix this first guys.

    #1106265

    Nancy H
    Participant

    As of a 2012 study, the life expectancy in the US is 78.74 years. When you take the size and age of the baby boomer generation into consideration, it doesn’t surprise me that half the rental population is over 40. After all, senior/retirement centers are predominately rental units too.

    I think when our city planners are talking about “walkability” they mean the things that well to do empty nesters/retirees want– restaurants, bars, high end shops.

    I would be willing to bet money that if you walked into any popular bar or restaurant in the urban areas, on any evening, you will find that the median age of the patrons is a whole lot closer to 25 than 65.

Viewing 11 posts - 16 through 26 (of 26 total)

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