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What and why do you buy local?

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Everyday Chit Chat What and why do you buy local?

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  • #79041

    Bear
    Participant

    I’ve noticed or heard a few people advocate buying things in recent days with an apologetic “I know it’s not local but…” tacked on to the end. That fact surprises me, because it suggests that the buy-local meme has achieved an impressive degree of taken-for-grantedness.

    That, in turn, makes me wonder why, and how.

    So, what kinds of things (broadly speaking) are you most likely to think about when you consider buying local, and what prompts you to buy local rather than not?

    (This is meant more as a sociological question than as a marketing survey; I’m interested in people’s thought processes, not in patterns of consumer behavior.)

    #319690

    berdawn
    Member

    I like to support sustainability as much as I can, as well keeping as much diversity as possible in the marketplace. I’m not much of a shopper, though, so it plays out more in terms of groceries: Snowville, CBC, Great Lakes.

    #319691

    Tenzo
    Participant

    Corn, cows and buckeyes.

    I’d venture to say, that this is the only state that may grow buckeyes on purpose.

    #319692

    10sun
    Member

    I buy foods & drinks that are available in a reasonable quantities and affordable prices (discounting the cost of driving around).

    Reasons to Buy:

    1. I like the challenge and exploration of trying to find a local variant of a standard; an example would be finding an apple orchard who sells farm cider nearby or getting squeaky cheese curds like the ones I got at a farmer’s market in Madison (haven’t accomplished that one yet). I can make day trips out of the exploration process, purchase enough for friends and then share later on.

    2. My girlfriend loves the sustainability angle.

    3. Sometimes it just tastes better.

    #319693
    Snarf
    Snarf
    Participant

    What: mostly food, csa, north market, ohio items at whole foods, local restaurants, etc.

    Why: it simply makes me feel good to know my dollars are going back into the hands of my fellow hardworking ohioans.

    #319694

    Bear wrote I’ve noticed or heard a few people advocate buying things in recent days with an apologetic “I know it’s not local but…” tacked on to the end. That fact surprises me, because it suggests that the buy-local meme has achieved an impressive degree of taken-for-grantedness.

    I suspect that this is an observer-created effect.

    ie – The utterer strongly believes that they will be subject to your intense interogation followed by extreme scorn and are engaging in pre-emptive defensive behavior.

    A.

    #319695
    Lauren Wilson
    Lauren Wilson
    Participant

    I buy local produce as much as possible because it usually tastes a whole lot better. I buy 2 silos eggs because I know they aren’t coming from a scary factory farm with sad beakless chickens. And I buy Snowville milk because until tasting that I realized I had no clue what milk really tasted like.
    And aside from Friday Chipotle lunches, I can’t think of any restaurants or bars I frequent that aren’t locally owned.

    #319696

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    Beer is a good example, there are good ones from all over the world but there are also good ones from right here in Ohio. Why send a 6-pack from Germany or Australia or even the Pacific Northwest? You can take a refillable growler to Barley’s and see the tanks your beer was brewed in.

    And the various U-Pick farms are great, I especially like to take kids so they can see how crops grow.

    #319697

    Roland
    Participant

    I make an effort to purchase locally produced food. As OSULew listed, Snowville and 2Silos are producing very good quality milk and eggs. Poultry from NM Poultry and Game. Beef from Bluescreek or Hill’s Market. I stick with vegetables and fruits that are in season. This really covers all the basics and there really isn’t much that a supermarket can offer me anymore except toilet paper and a few odds and ends.

    I used to go to the grocery store and stock up on a cartload of crap. The biggest change I’ve made in my shopping habits has been that I now only shop for a meal or two at a time and stop at multiple places quite often to get exactly what I want.

    I like to support local business and agriculture as much as possible.

    #319698
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    I buy most all of my meat locally. While this can get expensive really fast, if you can find a local farmer you trust it can be downright cheap. I pay less than 3 bucks a pound for pastured chicken and grass fed heritage breed pork. 75-100# of each yearly for the chest freezer gets us through the year. I have not found a beef source that I really like so if we need burger meat I can get Ohio stuff at Rife’s or Carfagna’s and know who cut it. Not grass fed however, but better than stuff from 100,000 head feedlots out west where then can grind 100 cows at a time into burger. Eggs are also local, tons of people will sell you crazy fresh eggs and the taste is so superior to regular eggs I cannot go back. Vegetable wise I grow most of them myself and can and freeze. Great local sources are Lynd’s and Hann farms, but you need to be able to store stuff in season to use out of season. Both of those are way cheaper than the supermarket as well. The funny thing is that most think buy local to be expensive, but looking around and using some storage techniques I have found brings the cost to less than getting it at the supermarket in most cases.

    #319699

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    There’s also a growing market for halal meats that are produced locally.

    #319700

    libby
    Member

    It’s not just buying meat and produce locally, I believe that it’s important to buy from our independent local stores who have invested their capital to make our communities thrive. Check out http://www.350project.net What 3 independently owned businesses would you miss if they disappeared?

    #319701

    Bear
    Participant

    Andrew Hall wrote >>

    Bear wrote I’ve noticed or heard a few people advocate buying things in recent days with an apologetic “I know it’s not local but…” tacked on to the end. That fact surprises me, because it suggests that the buy-local meme has achieved an impressive degree of taken-for-grantedness.

    I suspect that this is an observer-created effect.
    ie – The utterer strongly believes that they will be subject to your intense interogation followed by extreme scorn and are engaging in pre-emptive defensive behavior.
    A.

    It surely is observer-created, though in the examples I had in mind I’m never the person being spoken or written to (and, not to skew the discussion, my own consumption leans toward local but far from across the board, as many discussing the subject with me know.) But a good reminder — I’ll refrain from fondling thumbscrews contemplatively when others discuss the issue.

    #319702

    jenlauren
    Member

    Mostly food, including a split half of beef every year. I would love some suggestions on farmers for pork, lamb and poultry. My chest freezer is sadly empty right now.

    For me, I find that overall it is less expensive and tastes batter. I buy in bulk from the farmers market, add that to what I grow on my own and I end up doing a lot of freezing and canning.

    I always prefer to support local business owners when I can, even when that means that what I am buying isn’t locally made. At least some of the profit stays in the community. And to me that is what buying local is about. Keeping as much money on your local ecomony which in turn spurs growth.

    #319703

    dirtgirl
    Participant

    for me it’s fruit, vegetable and meats. I’ve found this has forced me to think seasonally and learn to preserve for winter.

    A coworker brought a salad for potluck the other day that had blueberries and strawberries on it, and I momentarily recoiled at the use of non-seasonal fruit. I certainly didn’t mean to become a local/seasonal snob and have to remind myself not everyone thinks that way.

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