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Obamacare / Healthcare Reform - News & Discussion

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Politics Obamacare / Healthcare Reform – News & Discussion

Viewing 15 posts - 1,036 through 1,050 (of 1,426 total)
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  • #380202
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    myliftkk said:
    And look, the “delay” might happen anyways http://www.marketwatch.com/story/obamacare-mandate-may-be-delayed-2013-10-23?link=MW_home_latest_news

    Is it too late for the Cruzettes to declare victory???

    Tell me it wouldn’t be a laugh riot if the individual mandate had to be delayed because of persistent problems like this:

    http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505269_162-57608843/healthcare.gov-pricing-feature-can-be-off-the-mark/

    CBS News ran the numbers for a 48-year-old in Charlotte, N.C., ineligible for subsidies. According to HealthCare.gov, she would pay $231 a month, but the actual plan on Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina’s website costs $360, more than 50 percent higher. The difference: Blue Cross and Blue Shield requests your birthday before providing more accurate estimates.

    The numbers for older Americans are even more striking. A 62-year-old in Charlotte looking for the same basic plan would get a price estimate on the government website of $394. The actual price is $634.

    Don’t know about “victory”. If the GOP was smart they’d have avoided the whole shutdown mess and just focused on pointing and laughing at this debacle.

    #380203
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    #380204

    RedStorm
    Participant

    http://thinkprogress.org/health/2013/10/24/2832891/obama-administration-compressed-timeframe-prevented-fully-testing-obamacare-website/

    Lulz.

    Yeah…you might want to fully/properly test this massive new Obamacare website before rolling it out to the public. Seems like a basic principle to me.

    #380205

    Dust
    Member

    Should hire the people who run porn sites they handle large volumes with no problems at all. ;)

    #380206
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    RedStorm said:
    http://thinkprogress.org/health/2013/10/24/2832891/obama-administration-compressed-timeframe-prevented-fully-testing-obamacare-website/

    Lulz.

    Yeah…you might want to fully/properly test this massive new Obamacare website before rolling it out to the public. Seems like a basic principle to me.

    You have to build the web site to find out what’s in it?

    #380207

    News
    Participant

    Online Marketplace Creates Anger, Frustration For Ohioans
    Friday October 25, 2013 4:43 PM

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – Testimony before Congress that federal officials did not fully test the online marketplace until two weeks before it was launched has led to disappointed and frustrated voices across the country. Colette Haley has tried for weeks to sign up online on the exchange. She runs her own small business in the German Village and has waited eight years to find affordable health insurance.

    READ MORE: http://www.10tv.com/content/stories/2013/10/25/columbus-local-health-care-website-frustrations.html

    #380208

    myliftkk
    Participant

    Interesting counterpoint to those who say websites can’t be done effectively when project managed correctly.

    http://talkingpointsmemo.com/dc/how-kentucky-built-the-country-s-best-obamacare-website

    Kentucky has been cited by numerous sources — the Wall Street Journal, NPR, the Advisory Board Company — as among the best of the best marketplaces since its launch. While the federal site has stumbled, Kentucky is being held up as evidence that the marketplace concept can work in practice.

    From that point forward, Kentucky’s game plan for a successful website launch could be read as a counterpoint to the mistakes that the Obama administration made in building its own website. The recipe for success in Kentucky was: A pared-down website engineered to perform the basic functions well and a concerted effort to test it as frequently as possible to work out glitches before the Oct. 1 launch.

    Beshear officially created the marketplace, now named kynect, on July 17, 2012, a few weeks after the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the Affordable Care Act. In October 2012, the state hired software developers to build the technological infrastructure behind the marketplace.

    Testing was undertaken throughout every step of the process, said Carrie Banahan, kynect’s executive director, and it was crucial because it allowed state officials to identify problems early in the process. She laid out the timeline like this: From January 2013 to March, they developed the system; from April to June, they built it; from July to September, they tested it.

    That stands in stark contrast to the picture painted by federal contractors at last week’s hearing on HealthCare.gov, which underwent testing only in the two weeks before launch. They stressed that they wished they had more time to test the marketplace’s functionality.

    “It would have been better to have more time,” Andrew Slavitt, group executive vice president at Optum/QSSI, told the committee.

    From a design standpoint, Kentucky made the conscious choice to stick to the basics, rather than seeking to blow users away with a state-of-the-art consumer interface. A big part of that was knowing their demographics: A simpler site would make it easer to access for people without broadband Internet access, and the content was written at a sixth-grade reading level so it would be as easy to understand as possible.

    #380209
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    #380210
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    myliftkk said:
    Interesting counterpoint to those who say websites can’t be done effectively when project managed correctly.

    While back at the Federal level:

    http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2013/10/the-stunning-negligence-that-doomed-obamacares-launch/280909/

    The Stunning Negligence That Doomed Obamacare’s Launch
    These aren’t forgivable glitches that no one could have foreseen. They’re unforced, avoidable errors that show signs of being difficult to fix.
    Conor Friedersdorf Oct 28 2013, 5:56 AM ET

    Observers could reasonably dismiss the earliest reports of Obamacare website failures. Multiple glitches at launch aren’t ideal, but they happen to even successful projects. So long as the overall effort was competently run, there was no reason to panic: If most everything was as it should’ve been, fixes could’ve been made quickly.

    But Obamacare wasn’t competently run.

    #380211

    News
    Participant

    #380212
    Coremodels
    Coremodels
    Participant

    This could be very problematic.

    http://investigations.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/10/28/21213547-obama-admin-knew-millions-could-not-keep-their-health-insurance?lite

    Four sources deeply involved in the Affordable Care Act tell NBC NEWS that 50 to 75 percent of the 14 million consumers who buy their insurance individually can expect to receive a “cancellation” letter or the equivalent over the next year because their existing policies don’t meet the standards mandated by the new health care law. One expert predicts that number could reach as high as 80 percent. And all say that many of those forced to buy pricier new policies will experience “sticker shock.”

    #380213
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    Coremodels said:
    This could be very problematic.

    Yep.

    http://www.kaiserhealthnews.org/Stories/2013/October/21/cancellation-notices-health-insurance.aspx

    Florida Blue, for example, is terminating about 300,000 policies, about 80 percent of its individual policies in the state. Kaiser Permanente in California has sent notices to 160,000 people – about half of its individual business in the state. Insurer Highmark in Pittsburgh is dropping about 20 percent of its individual market customers, while Independence Blue Cross, the major insurer in Philadelphia, is dropping about 45 percent.

    Both Independence and Highmark are cancelling so-called “guaranteed issue” policies, which had been sold to customers who had pre-existing medical conditions when they signed up. Policyholders with regular policies because they did not have health problems will be given an option to extend their coverage through next year.

    Consumer advocates say such cancellations raise concerns that companies may be targeting their most costly enrollees.

    They may be “doing this as an opportunity to push their populations into the exchange and purge their systems” of policyholders they no longer want, said Jerry Flanagan, an attorney with the advocacy group Consumer Watchdog in California.

    [b]Some receiving cancellations say it looks like their costs will go up, despite studies projecting that about half of all enrollees will get income-based subsidies.[/b]

    Kris Malean, 56, lives outside Seattle, and has a health policy that costs $390 a month with a $2,500 deductible and a $10,000 in potential out-of-pocket costs for such things as doctor visits, drug costs or hospital care.

    As a replacement, Regence BlueShield is offering her a plan for $79 more a month with a deductible twice as large as what she pays now, but which limits her potential out-of-pocket costs to $6,250 a year, including the deductible.

    “My impression was …there would be a lot more choice, driving some of the rates down,” said Malean, who does not believe she is eligible for a subsidy.

    Regence spokeswoman Rachelle Cunningham said the new plans offer consumers broader benefits, which “in many cases translate into higher costs.”

    [b]“The arithmetic is inescapable,” said Patrick Johnston, chief executive officer of the California Association of Health Plans. Costs must be spread, so while some consumers will see their premiums drop, others will pay more — “no matter what people in Washington say.” [/b]

    ETA: emphasis mine.

    #380214
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    What a difference a year makes.

    #380215

    Coremodels said:
    This could be very problematic.

    http://investigations.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/10/28/21213547-obama-admin-knew-millions-could-not-keep-their-health-insurance?lite

    Four sources deeply involved in the Affordable Care Act tell NBC NEWS that 50 to 75 percent of the 14 million consumers who buy their insurance individually can expect to receive a “cancellation” letter or the equivalent over the next year because their existing policies don’t meet the standards mandated by the new health care law. One expert predicts that number could reach as high as 80 percent. And all say that many of those forced to buy pricier new policies will experience “sticker shock.”

    eh. It’s just another phony scandal…

    #380216

    myliftkk
    Participant

    Coremodels said:
    This could be very problematic.

    http://investigations.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/10/28/21213547-obama-admin-knew-millions-could-not-keep-their-health-insurance?lite

    Four sources deeply involved in the Affordable Care Act tell NBC NEWS that 50 to 75 percent of the 14 million consumers who buy their insurance individually can expect to receive a “cancellation” letter or the equivalent over the next year because their existing policies don’t meet the standards mandated by the new health care law. One expert predicts that number could reach as high as 80 percent. And all say that many of those forced to buy pricier new policies will experience “sticker shock.”

    Hmmm, 80% of the individual insurance market policies aren’t worth the paper they’re written on. Not really a surprise there if you know the market.

    As far as people “keeping” their insurance, it was obvious to anyone knowledgable in health care, that that statement really only applied to insurance via employer.

    That said, you have to evaluate each of the individual’s claim with what the exchange offers versus what their current company chose to offer them. In most cases, they can find similar plans on the exchange and that’s w/o subsidies counted in which frankly a lot of the individual plan buyers will qualify for. In the above example, BlueShield isn’t even on the WA exchange, they’re just offering to replace the woman’s policy with one that meets new federal guidelines and no doubt meets their financial targets.

Viewing 15 posts - 1,036 through 1,050 (of 1,426 total)

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