Our City Online

Messageboard - General Columbus Discussion

NOTE: You are viewing an archived version of the Columbus Underground forums/messageboard. As of 05/22/16 they have been closed to new comments and replies, but will remain accessible for archived searches and reference. For more information CLICK HERE

Weinland Park Neighbors

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Weinland Park Neighbors

Viewing 15 posts - 556 through 570 (of 579 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #314239

    meg
    Member

    I want the houses in my neighborhood to look like homes, not businesses. Even small, simple, clean signage can ruin the appearance of a street and make a beautiful, well maintained property look cheap.

    #314240

    coolbuckeye
    Participant

    WP sits on a SID, NID, and a TIFF

    #314241

    c_odden
    Participant

    meg said:
    I want the houses in my neighborhood to look like homes, not businesses. Even small, simple, clean signage can ruin the appearance of a street and make a beautiful, well maintained property look cheap.

    I have trouble imagining anyone other than a landlord (or, sometimes, a complainant) who benefits from signage. Seems the issue is that rental property is the extension of commerce into a noncommercial zone, and signage explicitly advertises the transience of the population. (agreeing with meg…) It’s not a signifier of community — “Welcome to ______” — but rather says, loud and clear, “the owner does not live here” and “attention: this is a non-permanent residence.”

    Incidentally, just because a property is mowed and not visibly rotting doesn’t mean it’s being kept up or otherwise isn’t being abused. There’s a property on Oakland Ave between Summit & 4th that got an unpermitted attic renovation, with insulation crammed between the rafters, unventilated. In 20-odd years it’ll look like the miserable attics of hasty Short North attic conversions, with rotting roof decking/rafters and endemic mold. The yard is mowed regularly, however. And it has a classy metal sign screwed into the second story, in case you’d like to rent it next year.

    #314242

    roy
    Participant

    mrsgeedeck said:
    …I think Columbus is quite unique in having such a massive urban campus meaning students and lower income student housing abuts residential neighborhoods on all sides…

    It’s not unique at all, most large universities in medium/big cities are surrounded by residential. What’s unique to the OSU area are decades of code enforcement failures and reactive development in place of good neighborhood planning. Critical to a good university neighborhood is housing stock, the kind university faculty members and staff want to buy for their families. The City for years allowed original single family homes to be demolished, then approved hardship variances for cheap, ugly concrete block apartments. Similarly, the City presided over an astoundingly negative trend by allowing property owners to purchase 1 or 2 family residences, then cry hardship, obtaining variances to carve formerly attractive, stately homes into a warren of tiny ‘apartments.’ Student tenants have cars, and when you replace a SF home with 19 crappy little apartments, there will be parking problems.

    With housing stock thus decimated, the university neighborhoods began to show the negative impacts that are common in areas with a low-to-zero number of owner occupied homes. With a transient student rental population and sharply out of balance ratio of owner occupied homes, university types abandoned the area and I don’t blame them, when I first came down here from Ann Arbor I was shocked at the dirt front yards in view from the university’s main gateway entrance. Professor types like my parents choose to work in a university community, and living nearby is all part of the life. But not at OSU, who’d raise their kids in that chaotic mess?

    There’s an old joke at the City, that there exists no planning department, instead it’s The Department of Reacting (apologies to VinceP: it’s not your fault). Like most things it all comes down to money, and developers have always been among the biggest donors to the city council campaigns of those who approve their variances. The conditions this has wrought, coupled with failed code enforcement, are what’s unique to Columbus and OSU.

    #314243

    labi
    Participant

    c_odden said:
    I’d guess that it’s small landlords with only a couple properties who are mostly likely to back out with a shock to student demand…

    I agree with 98% of your post(s) and 100% share your frustration, but…once a house has been converted to a rooming-house-style rental (which virtually always involves stripping it of all historic interior features that a homeowner might value – just as you mention about 404 Wyandotte), it becomes very unlikely that an owner-occupier family will ever move back in. The structure is just undesirable, as well as too expensive. So to me, it doesn’t matter much whether there are bigger landlords or smaller ones when it comes to this particular issue.

    That’s a key reason why I’m for the moratorium idea, and will be looking for ways to limit this kind of “rehabilitation” in the next neighborhood plan.

    #314244

    buckeyecpa
    Participant

    The trouble with campus began during the DeSantis years. He wasn’t the only one at that time but he was the one that left a lasting negative impression towards campus. His mark is still on several buildings today. I’ve personally worked hard along with a few other landlords/management groups to try to make improvements to the area. I’ve also seen the worst of properties during my time. Often, I field calls to purchase a property that is beyond ruined. I’d consider them unrentable. Generally they are smaller landlords that thought investing in the area automatically gave them a loaded bank account and can no longer operate. If possible, I’ll purchase and rehab, but not people cram. Bur often times its not reasonable to purchase at the asking price. My hope is to see this district through a major improvement and be a contributor. I live and work in this area and I take great pride in what I do.

    The thing both of us must realize is there will be landlords and there will be owners. Now once this is accepted we must stop the bickering and find a solution to work better together. We can benefit from each other if we work together.

    What are things we can do together to improve this area? I’m willing to continue investing into the area. Not only money but also my time. But let’s work together.

    #314245

    rory
    Participant

    buckeyecpa said:

    The thing both of us must realize is there will be landlords and there will be owners. Now once this is accepted we must stop the bickering and find a solution to work better together. We can benefit from each other if we work together.

    What are things we can do together to improve this area? I’m willing to continue investing into the area. Not only money but also my time. But let’s work together.

    You’re right that everyone has to start working together. I think it’s going to be tricky – something I didn’t get clearly across in my previously peevish post. But I think the first step is to stop these expansive renovations that are skewed toward a narrow demographic that may or may not be there next year.

    I’d suggest guidelines for the review board instead of their current appearance review approach to give them some teeth. Just doing things the way they have been for the last 20 years isn’t working. How popular that would be is another question.

    #314246

    labi
    Participant

    buckeyecpa said:
    My hope is to see this district through a major improvement and be a contributor. I live and work in this area and I take great pride in what I do.

    We can benefit from each other if we work together.

    What are things we can do together to improve this area? I’m willing to continue investing into the area. Not only money but also my time. But let’s work together.

    My impression after six years of heavy involvement is that landlords are not exactly underrepresented in neighborhood politics. If you have new ideas about how to steer things in a better direction, by all means share.

    We may already have met – but if not, please feel free to PM me. We need all the voices at the table. (Haha, wait, “voices at the table”? Whatever!)

    #314247

    c_odden
    Participant

    The thing both of us must realize is there will be landlords and there will be owners. Now once this is accepted we must stop the bickering and find a solution to work better together. We can benefit from each other if we work together.

    I haven’t seen anyone arguing for 0% rentals, or 0% homeownership. There’s a difference between making an argument about the neighborhood proportion of rentals / O-O and making an argument whether a particular property should be a rental or be owner occupied (kind of how discussions about population usually aren’t about what individuals should live or die — yet the practical implication is that unless we like the status quo lives and businesses will be affected).

    As a homeowner, more homeownership (hence fewer rentals) is better. As a former tenant, areas with more homeownership yielded better experiences — but of course as a tenant I needed rentals to exist! I have yet to have an experience where I think “I’m really glad that’s a rental” or “I wish those homeowners would get out so someone could manage that property, replacing the occupants with a stream of tenants.” Granted, I live in the OSU area.

    I live and work in this area and I take great pride in what I do.

    That’s excellent, but I bet it makes you rare among area landlords (at least, the “live and work” part). Homeowners should want their neighborhood’s landlords to live in the neighborhood, not the least because spatial proximity is directly related to responsibility/culpability — perhaps also for the same arguments in favor of cops and teachers and politicians living nearer to their constituents. I bet (no evidence) that landlords who live close are more likely to choose tenants that neighbors will like. OK, so that’s a lot of speculation without presenting any evidence — I’d love to know what others think.

    Finally (mostly @buckeyecpa): if homes have been thrashed and are unattractive except to lowest-common-denominator landlords or misguided flippers etc., is this a case of ‘market failure’ of the sort Campus Partners claimed justified direct intervention to build the Gateway? That is, is a “bailout” of sorts required to improve things because the housing stock won’t yield a healthy neighborhood based on the market alone?

    #314248

    meg
    Member

    My friends and I were harassed tonight by Campus Partners security at the Gateway. Eleven of us rode our bikes over to go see a movie and we initially chained our bikes outside Coldstone. The owner of the Irish Pub across from Mad Mex asked us to park out on the sidewalk and not in the alley and we obliged. We moved our bikes out to the city sidewalk along high street, parked them legally (I am very confident that weren’t blocking sidewalk traffic or violating anything) and we locked them together. We were friendly.
    We went into the theater and were buying tickets when we were approached by security and told that if we didn’t move our bikes again they would cut our locks while we were in the theater. So we left. Instead we went to Weinland Park and let neighborhood kids take turns trying out our bikes. Thanks for the completely pointless and confusing hostility, Campus Partners. I have no idea what your objective was.

    #314249

    meg
    Member

    Also, how do we go about getting a drinking fountain installed in the park? The little kids and bike riders are thirsty.

    #314250

    NerosNeptune
    Participant

    Did you lock up to trees or signs? If I remember right they have some signs up saying not to lock to those around the gateway. Otherwise who knows, maybe the security guys were just bored with the students gone for summer.

    For future reference though, there are a ton of bike racks in the gateway parking garage.

    #314251

    labi
    Participant

    meg said:
    My friends and I were harassed tonight by Campus Partners security at the Gateway…Thanks for the completely pointless and confusing hostility, Campus Partners. I have no idea what your objective was.

    You could contact Erin Prosser at Campus Partners if you want to ask: [email protected]. She’s always been very helpful when I’ve had questions for her. If you had problems, you might not be the only ones, and she’ll want to know about it. I’ll be interested to hear more.

    #314252

    labi
    Participant

    meg said:
    Also, how do we go about getting a drinking fountain installed in the park? The little kids and bike riders are thirsty.

    This is a great idea (I’m thinking about the zillions of disposable cups I’ve picked up in the park over the years.) Try starting with Isom Nivins, the Northside Pride Center neighborhood liaison: [email protected]. He should be able to point you in the right direction. Let us know what he says.

    #314253

    jimbach
    Participant

    meg said:
    Also, how do we go about getting a drinking fountain installed in the park? The little kids and bike riders are thirsty.

    That’s a good question. I’ll see if I can find out an answer for you.

Viewing 15 posts - 556 through 570 (of 579 total)

The forum ‘General Columbus Discussion’ is closed to new topics and replies.

Subscribe below: