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Weinland Park Neighbors

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Weinland Park Neighbors

Viewing 15 posts - 541 through 555 (of 579 total)
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  • #314224

    meg
    Member

    jimbach said:
    I’ve never understood why it can’t be both. Not to revive an old argument, but there’s clearly some overlap between campus/university area an the Short North.

    When people ask me where I live, I answer “Weinland Park”. I do see it as a neighborhood situated between both areas.
    Whenever I walk or bike places from my house, I almost always go south to Short North rather than north to campus. There’s not much north of the library and south of Hudson that I visit often.

    #314225

    jimbach
    Participant

    meg said:
    When people ask me where I live, I answer “Weinland Park”. I do see it as a neighborhood situated between both areas.
    Whenever I walk or bike places from my house, I almost always go south to Short North rather than north to campus. There’s not much north of the library and south of Hudson that I visit often.

    Well, I work on campus (and am on the UAC) so I have my own particular, and possibly skewed, view of these things. I live almost the entirety of my day-to-day live in the area between Hudson and Goodale and the river and the railroad tracks. I see that area as a number of different neighborhoods that all blend together.

    #314226

    jimbach
    Participant

    mrsgeedeck said:The problem however lies partly in the perception of the neighborhoods, do you think anyone would claim that Upper Arlington (or at least parts) were located in the University District? I feel like that designation holds negative connotations for many and for homeowners whose property values can range anywhere from 90k to over 1 million dollars as the new builds have demonstrated, this can be frustrating.

    You are not kidding. The perception of the university area is that it’s dirty, noisy, dangerous (in parts) and certainly no place that a fine upstanding adult would visit, except on OSU football game days, when they are more than happy to clog up our streets and dump their trash onto our sidewalks. That perception might change if OSU’s president would decide to make his or her home in the university area, instead of a leafy suburb. Sadly, on this issue they’ve all been gutless cowards. I firmly believe that single act alone would help change the perception of our area immensely.

    #314227
    vestanpance
    vestanpance
    Participant

    I always used ghetto Kroger as the line of where the short north starts and then the bridge into downtown where it stops. Go east and west one block off high and that’s your other boarders.

    #314228

    mrsgeedeck
    Participant

    @jimbach Interesting theory, that we have see tested out if Gee does buy in the area. Granted he won’t be University President for long, but he’s got big shoes to fill and would arguably be one of the more high profile “University District” residents.

    #314229

    mrsgeedeck
    Participant

    vestanpance said:
    I always used ghetto Kroger as the line of where the short north starts and then the bridge into downtown where it stops. Go east and west one block off high and that’s your other boarders.

    By that demarcation Harrison Park and 1/2 of Italian Village is out…which I guess goes back to the question of University District/Short North…is/should the Short North be utilized to high density business arts district, while the residential area are the individual neighborhoods within the University District?

    #314230
    vestanpance
    vestanpance
    Participant

    mrsgeedeck said:
    should the Short North be utilized to high density business arts district, while the residential area are the individual neighborhoods within the University District?

    I guess that’s how it works in my brain.

    #314231

    labi
    Participant

    mrsgeedeck said:
    By that demarcation Harrison Park and 1/2 of Italian Village is out…which I guess goes back to the question of University District/Short North…is/should the Short North be utilized to high density business arts district, while the residential area are the individual neighborhoods within the University District?

    These are the key neighborhood plan questions: How do we see ourselves now? Where do we want to be in 10 years?

    I feel like too many people in the planning process are holding onto 15-year-old visions regarding both questions. That’s why I’m asking here – what do we who live here now think today?

    #314232

    meg
    Member

    I want more owner-occupied homes. More families. Fewer students. Fewer landlords, and only those who can manage their properties without a phone number permanently attached to the front of their buildings.

    #314233

    buckeyecpa
    Participant

    meg said:
    I want more owner-occupied homes. More families. Fewer students. Fewer landlords, and only those who can manage their properties without a phone number permanently attached to the front of their buildings.

    Very few of the signs on the properties look bad. The landlords that have those signs are generally the more active landlords that also attempt to contribute at the meetings. I would be more than willing to walk with you through several streets in the campus area to discuss this. You will see the properties that have small signage are in much better shape on the exterior than those that have nothing. The signage places accountability on the landlord. If you have a sign on a property falling apart it isn’t good for business. Now I do not believe you should be allowed having billboard advertisements or even signage that is intended to showcase another property near by.

    Also, I have personally deal with utility companies, police, and firemen that have stated the signage is helpful in an emergency situation. Sure they can look at the auditor’s site to find out who the owner is and contact but that generally isn’t the best in an emergency.

    But you also are the type of person I was addressing in a previous post. You just came across as the type that isn’t willing to contact a landlord and discuss a matter and find a common goal. Fewer landlords isn’t happening so why state that. Why not reach across the aisle and meet with the landlords that you have issues with and discuss a resolution that would make this area nicer. I know my time and money along with a few others have been placed in this area for many years. Also, again as stated it would be helpful to have more owner occupied places in this area. I’ve worked in the campus area for many years and have went further by moving into the neighborhood and intend to remain for many years to come.

    #314234

    mrsgeedeck
    Participant

    labi said:
    These are the key neighborhood plan questions: How do we see ourselves now? Where do we want to be in 10 years?

    I feel like too many people in the planning process are holding onto 15-year-old visions regarding both questions. That’s why I’m asking here – what do we who live here now think today?

    In that case, I think if we were honest with ourselves we’d go with University District. Regardless of the economic and artistic currency the Short North brings to the city, we’re nothing in comparison to OSU.

    #314235

    meg
    Member

    I’m happy to contact any landlord where I see problems, and I agree that the most negligent landlords don’t have signs up. While the signs may be helpful for the reasons you listed, a less conspicuous sign by the entrance would just as easily provide your contact info to utility companies and emergency services.

    To me, the signs appear to be permanent rental advertisements that reinforce the message that WP is not for long-term residents.

    #314236

    buckeyecpa
    Participant

    Fair point on the signage. I apologize if I come across harsh in my previous post. I tend to prefer small signage myself. Something simple and clean stating the business along with the number. Nothing large. But signage on rentals isn’t something uncommon in most cities.

    I believe in the area as having the ability to be something better. It would just be nice if groups could work together. The landlords that I know actually value having owner occupied houses around. But the feeling isn’t often mutual.

    There is room for improvement throughout. I think the key to the growth is High Street. I think the appearance is rundown in general. Sidewalks are bad (but hopefully will be restored by Columbia Gas) and buildings are dated and worn down. Most see High Street when entering the district and an improvement would make the area more appealing to live in. I would also like to see a SID considered for the area. But that’s something that is most likely not happening if not done so by now.

    #314237

    rory
    Participant

    buckeyecpa said:
    Very few of the signs on the properties look bad. The landlords that have those signs are generally the more active landlords that also attempt to contribute at the meetings. I would be more than willing to walk with you through several streets in the campus area to discuss this. You will see the properties that have small signage are in much better shape on the exterior than those that have nothing. The signage places accountability on the landlord. If you have a sign on a property falling apart it isn’t good for business. Now I do not believe you should be allowed having billboard advertisements or even signage that is intended to showcase another property near by.

    Also, I have personally deal with utility companies, police, and firemen that have stated the signage is helpful in an emergency situation. Sure they can look at the auditor’s site to find out who the owner is and contact but that generally isn’t the best in an emergency.

    But you also are the type of person I was addressing in a previous post. You just came across as the type that isn’t willing to contact a landlord and discuss a matter and find a common goal. Fewer landlords isn’t happening so why state that. Why not reach across the aisle and meet with the landlords that you have issues with and discuss a resolution that would make this area nicer. I know my time and money along with a few others have been placed in this area for many years. Also, again as stated it would be helpful to have more owner occupied places in this area. I’ve worked in the campus area for many years and have went further by moving into the neighborhood and intend to remain for many years to come.

    I think the signs look horrible. They have no place on a historic house and they contribute to a general atmosphere of transience. That being said they do come in handy when the yard is full of trash but that doesn’t work very often so I’m not convinced of the accountability factor. It’s always leave a message. And having seen a couple houses on fire in the neighborhood the fire department better get there quick and get the number. I really don’t see any useful purpose to them in the internet age other than being a billboard. I’d rather have code enforcement pick up the accountability part rather than rely on the slight chance of public shaming from a rental sign.

    I’ve talked to landlords in the area and I can see your common ground argument, and I’ve tried but I’m finding that I don’t have much in common with a lot of them. I’m always the idiot and a poor businessman in these conversations because I’m told could make a lot more money by renting out the attic and basement in my rental house, paving the backyard and moving to the suburbs and not worry about any of consequences for the neighborhood because it’s campus. In Weinland Park, there’s a big racial component – some landlords feel no need to maintain anything because of their tenants skin color or are convinced the neighborhood will never get “better” as long as African Americans are present. On the other hand, some are convinced they have the last cheap house in the Short North and want to see it move in that direction. I’m not sure there is a common vision. Overall personally, I’m for fewer landlords too, absentee ones any way that just see Weinland Park as an extension of campus waiting to be exploited when it’s safe enough. And while increased owner-occupancy isn’t going happen in the core student area it’s happening on the periphery and will accelerate rapidly if there’s any incentives incorporated in the planning process such as not having the house next to you double in size overnight. Combine that with owner-occupied homes at the Coated Fabrics site and you’ve got a neighborhood. Italian Village had pretty low owner-occupancy rate once upon a time too. The Circles was was a horrible part of town. These things can change but you have to stop digging the hole first.

    #314238

    c_odden
    Participant

    Maybe rentals with signage tend to be better tended, but there’s the implication that, 24/7/365, that place is about commerce. There’s also an implication that, by posting a sign, the landlord is taking ownership for the condition of the property — it’s the concomitant disruption of the larger context as a place where people live that’s so jarring.

    Overall personally, I’m for fewer landlords too, absentee ones any way that just see Weinland Park as an extension of campus waiting to be exploited when it’s safe enough.

    If anything, I might be in favor of more landlords (but fewer rentals, ya dig?), if only because shrinking demand for student housing is unlikely to deter mega-slumlords. (wild speculation here:) I’d guess that it’s small landlords with only a couple properties who are mostly likely to back out with a shock to student demand, and I’d rather see less market concentration rather than more (I appreciate the economies of scale argument that larger businesses do certain things more efficiently/effectively, but monopoly/monoculture is bad for communities). I’d love to know what others think about this.

    About 404 Wyandotte, the house featured in the Dispatch story: I live across the street, I knew the owner (Amy, who lived there for decades), they heroin-addicted squatter who lived there for 4-5 years after she left for a nursing home, and I’ve watched the front yard get trashed, the house gutted of thousands of dollars of irreplaceable trim, the backyard turned into a mud pit, and zero evidence that the Chois are making an investment in the neighborhood except in a purely profit-driven, maximum-expediency way. Aside from it being an eyesore that greets me every morning when I look out my bedroom window, I have the pleasure of anticipating it packed with young adults who’ve never lived without adult supervision.

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