Our City Online

Messageboard - Shopping

NOTE: You are viewing an archived version of the Columbus Underground forums/messageboard. As of 05/22/16 they have been closed to new comments and replies, but will remain accessible for archived searches and reference. For more information CLICK HERE

WalMart is "Going Urban" with New Stores

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Shopping WalMart is “Going Urban” with New Stores

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 269 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #384889

    Pablo
    Participant

    Analogue Kid wrote >>
    I’m not a huge fan of the chain, but I would actually like to see a Walmart on the old Timken site in Chickenville (Milo-Grogan).

    About 7 years ago Walmart was looking at this area – but not the Timken site. They were considering leveling all the housing between Cleveland Ave. and I-71 for better highway exposure for a supercenter. I’m glad they never followed through with the project…

    #384890

    Mercurius
    Participant

    #384891

    berdawn
    Member

    gramarye wrote >>

    joev wrote >>
    If I were running Walmart, I think it would be wise to develop these under a new brand rather than with the baggage that comes along with the Walmart name.

    The thing with this is that, while Wal-Mart is well aware that it has image problems in certain quarters, on the whole, its brand is more asset than liability.
    I imagine they’ll come up with a brand variant for these smaller, local stores just to let their customers know what they’re getting–“Wal-Mart Local,” “Wal-Mart Minicenter,” or something of that kind to let someone searching on Google Maps know that they’re not going to find a full-service 250,000 square foot space at these locations. I would expect it to have the Wal-Mart name as part of the name, however.

    “Waltons'” might be taken but something along those lines would make sense.

    Sam’s is now offering business loans. 3:00 might soon be Pepsi.

    #384892

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    gramarye wrote >>
    I’d welcome an urban Wal-Mart in downtown Akron. We’ve got tons of underdeveloped land for it–even if it maintained a substantial parking requirement, though obviously I’d be happier if it found a way to do without that.

    As an Akron native myself, I know that there is definitely a need for downtown retail there. Having said that, however, I’m not sure that Downtown Akron has anywhere near the critical mass needed to support a smaller store or chain, much less a Wal-Mart (Columbus is much further along). The city is investing heavily in student housing for the University of Akron, but not nearly enough in affordable housing for adult non-students.

    #384893

    Snarf wrote >>
    Why do people complain about stores they don’t shop at anyways?

    Because we care about those being affected by poor labor practices, environmental devastation, and other irresponsible behaviors that will affect us all in one way or another, now or down the line.

    #384894

    somertimeoh
    Participant

    Every vendor supplying Fortune 500 companies gets bullied in to razor thin margins. I’d be happy if I had ANY margin on the majority of products I sell to a company most people on this board interact with numerous times a day. If you think this type of practice is unique to WalMart, you’re mistaken. I don’t shop at WalMart on a regular basis for many reasons, but it has less to do with them and more to do with me and my needs – close to home, small store so I can get in and out easy, etc. The reasons people use to publicly chastise them could be said about every Big Box retailer out there. WalMart just got the brunt of it because it’s the biggest and has the most recognizable stereotypes attached.

    I remember as a kid KMart was the crappy place and WalMart was the new, fancy place. My town still only has one Target so customer base is mostly just split based on geography. I’m sure there’s just as much white trash floating around Target because it’s in the older part of town.

    There are multiple brandings of WalMart. In my parent’s area they have these things called WalMart Neighborhood Markets. They are smaller and green instead of blue and the buildings look a lot more like the rendering than the standard cement block looking slab that everyone thinks of. They look like Whole Foods from the inside out.

    It is a luxury to have choices about where to shop. Many people on government assistance need that money to spread as thin as possible. The allure of paying a quarter for a roll of TP vs a buck, $1.50 for milk vs $3, $2 for cereal vs $4, etc. means something.

    #384895

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    osulew wrote >>
    I’d go for an urban Target but not a Wal-Mart.

    I’d also vote for Target over Wal-Mart. But home-grown, IMHO, trumps them both.

    #384896
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    osulew wrote >>
    I’d go for an urban Target but not a Wal-Mart.

    Same here, though it’s more about my own tastes in product selection, customer service, and personal preference more than any sort of big-box taboo associated with Wal-Mart. That being said, I’m sure I’d shop in a Downtown Wal-Mart from time to time if one were to set up there. The North Market doesn’t sell diapers, and it’s far from practical to buy them from CVS.

    I think the most important factor in this story is that WalMart is willing to play nice with the requests of Downtown commissions and neighbors and other city officials. If they’re willing to decrease their footprint, increase their wages, create a store that blends into the fabric of an urban environment and commit funding to local charities, I think that helps to negate a lot of the negative image that people have with Wal-Mart.

    And while I don’t have any data in front of me, or examples to point to, I have to imagine that a strategically placed Wal-Mart *might* have a positive impact on adjacent Downtown retailers. If foottraffic can be projected outward in some capacity and not internalized in a “park-your-car-go-in-wal-mart-go-back-out-to-your-car-nothing-else” configuration (the problem with the city center which devastated nearby retailers), we could end up with something that could spur additional small business development. I’d love to see a building that not only houses Wal-Mart, but additional small retail bays along their normally big blank exterior facade that can capture some of the foot traffic they’re likely to draw.

    Something worth considering anyway… if WalMart is looking to play ball…

    #384897

    RoundTowner
    Member

    thegenerallee wrote >>
    I, for one, am against it. Ever since I saw a piece online about how Wal-Mart bullies companies into giving them products for lower prices I refuse to shop there. One documentary I recently watched showed how Wal-Mart makes a lot of promises to the community when planning to build then ultimately results in the small, family / locally owned businesses closing up shop because of Wal-Mart moving in. I don’t look for reasons to dislike Wal-Mart but they’re practically handing out reasons.
    Support the USA people. Quit buying from a place that sells nothing but goods imported from factories in China.

    @surber17
    If you lived downtown what would you need that you couldn’t find at one of the stores located downtown? It’s got hardware stores, clothing stores, and loads of places to get food. Sure it may not be as cheap as Wal-Mart but for me I would rather pay a little bit more and support a local business. I’m not trying to force an opinion or say you should agree with me. Just throwing out some food for thought.

    During the 1920’s, Woolworths did the EXACT same thing, then Lazarus and Federated Dept stores had the same practices during their rein, its nothing new and will probably never go away.

    #384898

    JoeMitchell
    Member

    as stated by somertimeoh, there is very little difference between target and walmart in terms of relationships with employees and suppliers/source of goods

    Walmart has better employee benefits

    Target gets a pass for being chic

    They are both great places to purchase toiletries and socks

    #384899

    Coy
    Participant

    Uhg. I just threw up a little bit.

    Walmart has pushed out a ton of small business around the country, monopolized their locations with an overabundance of chinese junk, then turned around and paid the workers a lousy wage.
    They do their most damage in rural areas.
    I one played a gig way down in West Virginia, and we passed a Walmart… not TWO MILES down the road… ANOTHER WALMART. And there was nothing else around but empty shells of buildings where a small downtown used to be.
    My bandmates have similar stories about rural southern Ohio and how the Walmart moved in and the town was a mess a couple of years later.

    My last experience with Walmart was a single purchase of tires for my truck.
    I hadn’t bought anything from the big W for a LONG time, and I figured, whet the heck, its tires right?
    I went to the one in Reynoldsburg and they didn’t balance them right. Next day, I went to the one on Morse Rd (by my work) and they told me they wouldn’t balance them.. (bad hillbilly drawl) “well, you didn’t buy them HERE now did you…”.
    I ended up having to drive the 20 miles to the original store to get it fixed.
    I tried dealing with store management, and they were the most evasive and ignorant bunch of losers I have ever dealt with… They don’t give an eff… they’re WALMART.
    I will NEVER, EVER go back.

    Now, there are plenty of good folks working for Walmart, but how long is the cheap junk gonna flow, really? When it finally hits the fan, the bigger we allow this weed to get, the more its gonna leave a mess in its wake.
    Is it smart to teach our people to constantly consume large amounts of low cost (due to chinese workers and their lousy pay/conditions) goods as a benefit for being American?
    If we didn’t have such a thirst for cheap crap, then maybe we’d still have manufacturing work in this country.
    How bout we pay more for something made well BY Americans, so they can afford to shop somewhere else?

    No Walmart downtown!

    Get me a Trader Joe’s instead!
    THAT’s a company that treats its people right!

    #384900

    somertimeoh
    Participant

    Visuals for you all – which goes with which?

    #384901

    gramarye
    Participant

    Pretty sure the bottom picture is inside the Wal-Mart. I recognize the font, though not well enough to identify it by name and proceed to deride it as amateurish.

    #384902

    CheeseFoodie
    Participant

    +1 to Trader Joes! I can see Somer’s point for the most part; however, the OH town I grew up in now has a Walmart supercenter, meaning no other choices and the historic downtown area is now basically a ghost town. I’m really not in favor of Walmart being anywhere downtown.

    #384903

    gramarye
    Participant

    RoundTowner wrote >>

    thegenerallee wrote >>
    I, for one, am against it. Ever since I saw a piece online about how Wal-Mart bullies companies into giving them products for lower prices I refuse to shop there. One documentary I recently watched showed how Wal-Mart makes a lot of promises to the community when planning to build then ultimately results in the small, family / locally owned businesses closing up shop because of Wal-Mart moving in. I don’t look for reasons to dislike Wal-Mart but they’re practically handing out reasons.
    Support the USA people. Quit buying from a place that sells nothing but goods imported from factories in China.

    @surber17
    If you lived downtown what would you need that you couldn’t find at one of the stores located downtown? It’s got hardware stores, clothing stores, and loads of places to get food. Sure it may not be as cheap as Wal-Mart but for me I would rather pay a little bit more and support a local business. I’m not trying to force an opinion or say you should agree with me. Just throwing out some food for thought.

    During the 1920’s, Woolworths did the EXACT same thing, then Lazarus and Federated Dept stores had the same practices during their rein, its nothing new and will probably never go away.

    I don’t even understand the objections to this. Since when do manufacturers and distributors have some God-given right to be able to dictate terms to retailers?

    Wal-Mart’s business model involves “bullying” suppliers into selling for less so that Wal-Mart can turn around and sell the exact same products for less. In other words, some of the savings are retained by Wal-Mart as profit, but much is also passed on to the consumer. Wal-Mart’s own profit margins are pretty thin. It’s not exactly a great corporate secret that it’s a volume seller.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 269 total)

The forum ‘Shopping’ is closed to new topics and replies.

The Columbus Coffee Festival Returns!

The 6th Annual Columbus Coffee Festival returns on Saturday September 25th and Sunday September 26th!

CLICK HERE FOR TICKETS & INFORMATION