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WalMart is "Going Urban" with New Stores

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Shopping WalMart is “Going Urban” with New Stores

Viewing 15 posts - 241 through 255 (of 269 total)
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  • #385114
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    vestanpance wrote >>
    I think I posted in another thread awhile ago that this sounds good for the old sunflower space in the gateway. If I didn’t… This sounds good to go in the old sunflower space in the gateway.

    Why? Explain. ;)

    #385115
    vestanpance
    vestanpance
    Participant

    Walker wrote >>

    vestanpance wrote >>
    I think I posted in another thread awhile ago that this sounds good for the old sunflower space in the gateway. If I didn’t… This sounds good to go in the old sunflower space in the gateway.

    Why? Explain. ;)

    I think it would provide some small goods needs for students and fill in an already constructed empty retail space. No fancy explanation, just thought it was a good idea.

    #385116
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Gotcha. Honestly, I think that space is a little close to the new Kroger that’s almost finished, so there might be some overlap and competitiveness.

    Also, the former sunflower spot now has office space inside it, so it’s not empty. But not a retail use, which is more optimal.

    My interactions with students living in dorms on campus is somewhat limited, but the ones I do talk to generally have meal plans and little need for a full service grocery store. Their external food purchases are generally of the convenience variety, and even then, there are multiple on-campus locations for those purchases, which can be paid for with meal plans.

    The off-campus student population (primarily east of High) is where I think something like a WalMart would serve a better population, which is why I think locating closer to Fourth would be better than High Street. Not only could you serve offcampus students, but Weinland Park shoppers and anyone else zooming through the 4th/Summit expressway. ;)

    #385117

    GreatOutdoors
    Participant

    vestanpance wrote >>
    I think I posted in another thread awhile ago that this sounds good for the old sunflower space in the gateway. If I didn’t… This sounds good to go in the old sunflower space in the gateway.

    Since the (sad) day Sunflower Market closed it’s doors, I’ve been hoping that a Trader Joe’s moves into that space!

    #385118

    GreatOutdoors
    Participant

    GreatOutdoors wrote >>

    vestanpance wrote >>

    Since the (sad) day Sunflower Market closed it’s doors, I’ve been hoping that a Trader Joe’s moves into that space!

    uh…”its”

    #385119
    vestanpance
    vestanpance
    Participant

    Walker wrote >>
    Gotcha. Honestly, I think that space is a little close to the new Kroger that’s almost finished, so there might be some overlap and competitiveness.
    Also, the former sunflower spot now has office space inside it, so it’s not empty. But not a retail use, which is more optimal.
    My interactions with students living in dorms on campus is somewhat limited, but the ones I do talk to generally have meal plans and little need for a full service grocery store. Their external food purchases are generally of the convenience variety, and even then, there are multiple on-campus locations for those purchases, which can be paid for with meal plans.
    The off-campus student population (primarily east of High) is where I think something like a WalMart would serve a better population, which is why I think locating closer to Fourth would be better than High Street. Not only could you serve offcampus students, but Weinland Park shoppers and anyone else zooming through the 4th/Summit expressway. ;)

    ya, the students that live on campus do mostly have meal plans. But for some reason the CVS on Neil is packed all the time. I’m not sure what they are buying, but they are.

    I didn’t know the space was already in use (my office moved to north campus and I don’t make it down there as much to eat) That is good news it’s not empty.

    #385120

    News
    Participant

    Walmart Stores Go Small and Urban
    by Edward McMahon

    Can big box retailers think outside the box? A few years ago the idea of a pedestrian friendly big box store would have been laughable, but as urban living has become more popular the major chain retailers are paying attention and beginning to build urban format stores. On December 4, 2013 Walmart opened its first two stores in Washington, DC and the new stores illustrate the lengths to which brick and mortar retailers will go to get into rapidly growing urban markets.

    READ MORE: http://plannersweb.com/2014/02/walmart-stores-go-small-urban/

    #1015680

    News
    Participant

    What It’s Like To Be A Walmart Architect
    May 7, 2014 | 8:00 AM

    Late last year, I visited one of the first two Walmart stores to open in Washington, D.C., and discovered a Walmart unlike almost any other in the United States. It was a thoughtfully designed store with a spacious vestibule, parking hidden underground, and–wonder of wonders–windows. You can stand inside that store at the corner of Georgia and Missouri Avenues NW and actually see the color of the sky. I’ve been reporting on the big box retailer for a decade, and that Washington, D.C., store was so distinctive that it inspired a thought no Walmart ever has: Who designed this space?

    READ MORE: http://www.fastcodesign.com/3025934/slicker-city/what-its-like-to-be-a-walmart-architect

    #1015682

    bjones7
    Participant

    So does this mean downtown Columbus will be seeing Walmart soon? Eh I personally have mixed emotions on Walmart.

    #1015695

    Eugene_C
    Participant

    The problem with Walmart is that most of the kind of stuff they sell does not appeal to upscale urban dwellers. And they’re not going to get the huge volume discounts on that kind of stuff if they do choose to stock it. People in the city live in small spaces, not suburban homes. They buy more cosmopolitan stuff. They’re not going to buy Walmart’s regular clothing.

    The stores will certainly appeal to customers from lower income neighborhoods who can get to the stores by bus, but those neighborhoods have been here for decades and Walmart has never shown any interest in them. Perhaps they’re hoping that by throwing in the the mix of condo folks grabbing a few things like batteries and light bulbs that will be enough to put it over the top.

    #1015697

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    #1015736
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    The problem with Walmart is that most of the kind of stuff they sell does not appeal to upscale urban dwellers. And they’re not going to get the huge volume discounts on that kind of stuff if they do choose to stock it. People in the city live in small spaces, not suburban homes. They buy more cosmopolitan stuff. They’re not going to buy Walmart’s regular clothing.

    All of that is true, and coupled with the fact that Walmart is having trouble with low staffing issues, understocked shelves and long checkout lines and it sounds like a recipe for disaster to replicate in urban store settings:

    http://business.time.com/2013/03/27/hey-walmart-its-hard-to-make-sales-when-store-shelves-are-empty/

    I’ve not been inside any of their new urban-style stores, but will certainly check one out if I come across one. I’ve been in a few urban-style Targets (multi-story, smaller store, parking garage, urban location) and they’re great.

    #1015737
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    The problem with Walmart is that most of the kind of stuff they sell does not appeal to upscale urban dwellers. And they’re not going to get the huge volume discounts on that kind of stuff if they do choose to stock it. People in the city live in small spaces, not suburban homes. They buy more cosmopolitan stuff. They’re not going to buy Walmart’s regular clothing.

    The stores will certainly appeal to customers from lower income neighborhoods who can get to the stores by bus, but those neighborhoods have been here for decades and Walmart has never shown any interest in them. Perhaps they’re hoping that by throwing in the the mix of condo folks grabbing a few things like batteries and light bulbs that will be enough to put it over the top.

    Walmart sells exactly what people downtown want to buy. Everything. Now maybe some folks don’t like their particular brand, but people downtown will buy food, pillows, video games, toys, socks, wine, pharmacy and first aid things as well as the one million other little things that are not sold downtown, or are sold at 200% more than in the suburbs.

    #1015739

    gramarye
    Participant

    So does this mean downtown Columbus will be seeing Walmart soon? Eh I personally have mixed emotions on Walmart.

    The problem with Walmart is that most of the kind of stuff they sell does not appeal to upscale urban dwellers. And they’re not going to get the huge volume discounts on that kind of stuff if they do choose to stock it. People in the city live in small spaces, not suburban homes. They buy more cosmopolitan stuff. They’re not going to buy Walmart’s regular clothing.

    The stores will certainly appeal to customers from lower income neighborhoods who can get to the stores by bus, but those neighborhoods have been here for decades and Walmart has never shown any interest in them. Perhaps they’re hoping that by throwing in the the mix of condo folks grabbing a few things like batteries and light bulbs that will be enough to put it over the top.

    Keep in mind that Columbus covers more than 220 square miles. Is it likely that downtown Columbus is on the list for a Wal-Mart? Probably not. But read the article and look at where Wal-Mart went in D.C. It went into Brightwood, at the corner of Missouri NW and Georgia NW. It’s impossible to make perfect analogies here, of course, but just from a quick Google search for the location, demographics, and real estate prices there, that’s probably closer to coming into a neighborhood like Olde Towne East than the Short North or Downtown. It’s a nice neighborhood, and it’s on the border of some even nicer ones, but it’s not the hottest, trendiest neighborhood in the city. (But nor is it the cheapest, most neglected neighborhood in the city, either. It looks solidly and comfortably in the middle.)

    I think there are many neighborhoods in Columbus that would be open to the possibility of a Wal-Mart. Some neighborhoods (including the ones that I gather are nearest and dearest to the hearts of many on these boards) might be less welcoming, but I doubt that Wal-Mart would be looking for space on High Street in the Short North, anyway.

    #1015740

    Pablo
    Participant

    Walmart Scales Down and Branches Out
    Architectural Record
    By Amanda Kolson Hurley April 16, 2014

    If you heard that urban redevelopment in some Washington, D.C., neighborhoods was being spurred by Walmart, you might think it was a joke: Walmart, with its leviathan stores in the outer reaches of sprawl? But in a bid to crack urban markets, Walmart is piloting new, smaller store designs on infill sites, which sometimes integrate other uses and often connect with public transit. Its first two D.C. stores—out of an eventual total of six spread around the city—opened late last year. The third is now under construction in Fort Totten, a neighborhood a few miles north of the city’s downtown.

    Read More: http://archrecord.construction.com/news/2014/04/140416-Walmart-Scales-Down-and-Branches-Out.asp

Viewing 15 posts - 241 through 255 (of 269 total)

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