Our City Online

Messageboard - Shopping

NOTE: You are viewing an archived version of the Columbus Underground forums/messageboard. As of 05/22/16 they have been closed to new comments and replies, but will remain accessible for archived searches and reference. For more information CLICK HERE

WalMart is "Going Urban" with New Stores

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Shopping WalMart is “Going Urban” with New Stores

Viewing 15 posts - 151 through 165 (of 269 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #385024

    Klablut
    Member

    Twixlen wrote >>
    I “get” what both sides of this arguement are saying…. because I’ve felt both things. I mean, if someone is willing and able to sell something at a cheaper price than other folks in town with the same items, why on earth wouldn’t I take advantage of that? That’s the free market. Also, why do I care what WalMart does or doesn’t carry – what their own corporate culture deems as vulgar or appropriate – since I can find whatever I want in other stores or on the internet?
    And yet, I have a problem with it. I remember when WalMart came to the nearest town when I was a kid – how excited we were. It was a tiny store by today’s standards (this is mid/late 1970’s), and it was a big deal to get hired by WalMart. They had tough standards for their employees, and rewarded them in kind. It was a store that had brought many different stores under one roof – but it wasn’t necessarily cheaper. It was just a convenience thing.
    Compare that to modern WalMart. Now, stores are deliberately built within miles of one another to drive out local competition. Once that competition is gone, one store is usually the clear favorite, and the other store is mothballed – to sit empty, since WalMart will not sell their former stores to anyone deemed competition. In some cases, these stores have gotten so blighted, they’ve ended up being torn down with taxpayer money. We’ve seen this happen here in town (not necessarily the taxpayer tear-down, but the empty space) – I know I’ve seen it happen in other towns.
    WalMart DOES censor – they’ve admitted to that censorship, in the guise of creating a more “family friendly” environment. It makes me uncomfortable when a corporation wants to be my parent, or to parent. Because they are so very huge, record labels, magazines, books and such have either changed their cover/content entirely, or create a separate “WalMart” version. So, in all those small towns, where WalMart has driven out competition, and the vast majority of folks do all their shopping there – do they realize their choices are limited? Pema Chodron has some of the bestselling religion/spirituality books on Amazon – has anyone ever seen one of her books in a WalMart, the largest box store in the world? I’ve never seen a book there on anything but conventional Christianity, or generally very conservative values. And yup, it’s WalMart’s choice to limit selection in any way they please, but it makes me very uncomfortable to have them make those kinds of choices. Especially considering that they deliberately limit the choices of shopping locations in smaller towns.
    It’s taking me too long to articulate this – I’m sure ya’ll’ve moved on to discussing why it is so many folks feel like pajama bottoms and slippers are acceptible attire in some stores, blah blah blah.
    For me, there are problems with WalMart – they’ve had class action problems with how they’ve treated women in the workplace (deliberately limiting advancement, less pay, etc), they play games with hours of employees to keep them from qualifying for insurance (this was NY, not sure of OH rules), they censor (remember the Brokeback Mountain debacle?)… and when they are the largest private employer, the largest retailer, they ARE making choices for people.

    Thank you. There are a ton of issues with this company. Some just want to turn a blind eye because of the savings. It’s quite sad actually.

    #385025

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    lizless wrote >>
    Wal Mart is best experienced with a slight buzz at 4am.

    Try Meijer at that hour, and enjoy the hammering roar of the propane-powered floor buffer.

    #385026

    Core_Models
    Member

    Thank you. I have a ton of issues with this company. Some just don’t believe the same things I do. It’s quite sad actually.

    Fixed that for you.

    #385027

    roy
    Participant

    JoeMitchell wrote >>
    they do have an awesome return policy though, 90 days no questions asked, a few years ago we stepped up to an HDTV, bought it the day before the first osu/usc game then returned it on black friday for a better model and savings

    Seriously, you did that?

    #385028
    Snarf
    Snarf
    Participant

    Klablut wrote >>

    Twixlen wrote >>
    I “get” what both sides of this arguement are saying…. because I’ve felt both things. I mean, if someone is willing and able to sell something at a cheaper price than other folks in town with the same items, why on earth wouldn’t I take advantage of that? That’s the free market. Also, why do I care what WalMart does or doesn’t carry – what their own corporate culture deems as vulgar or appropriate – since I can find whatever I want in other stores or on the internet?
    And yet, I have a problem with it. I remember when WalMart came to the nearest town when I was a kid – how excited we were. It was a tiny store by today’s standards (this is mid/late 1970’s), and it was a big deal to get hired by WalMart. They had tough standards for their employees, and rewarded them in kind. It was a store that had brought many different stores under one roof – but it wasn’t necessarily cheaper. It was just a convenience thing.
    Compare that to modern WalMart. Now, stores are deliberately built within miles of one another to drive out local competition. Once that competition is gone, one store is usually the clear favorite, and the other store is mothballed – to sit empty, since WalMart will not sell their former stores to anyone deemed competition. In some cases, these stores have gotten so blighted, they’ve ended up being torn down with taxpayer money. We’ve seen this happen here in town (not necessarily the taxpayer tear-down, but the empty space) – I know I’ve seen it happen in other towns.
    WalMart DOES censor – they’ve admitted to that censorship, in the guise of creating a more “family friendly” environment. It makes me uncomfortable when a corporation wants to be my parent, or to parent. Because they are so very huge, record labels, magazines, books and such have either changed their cover/content entirely, or create a separate “WalMart” version. So, in all those small towns, where WalMart has driven out competition, and the vast majority of folks do all their shopping there – do they realize their choices are limited? Pema Chodron has some of the bestselling religion/spirituality books on Amazon – has anyone ever seen one of her books in a WalMart, the largest box store in the world? I’ve never seen a book there on anything but conventional Christianity, or generally very conservative values. And yup, it’s WalMart’s choice to limit selection in any way they please, but it makes me very uncomfortable to have them make those kinds of choices. Especially considering that they deliberately limit the choices of shopping locations in smaller towns.
    It’s taking me too long to articulate this – I’m sure ya’ll’ve moved on to discussing why it is so many folks feel like pajama bottoms and slippers are acceptible attire in some stores, blah blah blah.
    For me, there are problems with WalMart – they’ve had class action problems with how they’ve treated women in the workplace (deliberately limiting advancement, less pay, etc), they play games with hours of employees to keep them from qualifying for insurance (this was NY, not sure of OH rules), they censor (remember the Brokeback Mountain debacle?)… and when they are the largest private employer, the largest retailer, they ARE making choices for people.

    Thank you. There are a ton of issues with this company. Some just want to turn a blind eye because of the savings. It’s quite sad actually.

    And you, martyr of spending, are so SO much better than those people.

    #385029

    jungaroo
    Member

    Wal-Mart has had an urban strategy in the works for some time now. In Los Angeles, they did this rehab of an art deco department store:

    Three floors, historic rehab, urban – not what you expect at all from them. It’s also mixed in with other retail and they share the parking:

    Of course, particular factors induced this kind of development: 1) the city and community demanded higher quality and 2) Wal-Mart needed to do this to access a market in a land-scarce area.

    #385030

    Klablut
    Member

    Snarf wrote >>

    Klablut wrote >>

    Twixlen wrote >>
    I “get” what both sides of this arguement are saying…. because I’ve felt both things. I mean, if someone is willing and able to sell something at a cheaper price than other folks in town with the same items, why on earth wouldn’t I take advantage of that? That’s the free market. Also, why do I care what WalMart does or doesn’t carry – what their own corporate culture deems as vulgar or appropriate – since I can find whatever I want in other stores or on the internet?
    And yet, I have a problem with it. I remember when WalMart came to the nearest town when I was a kid – how excited we were. It was a tiny store by today’s standards (this is mid/late 1970’s), and it was a big deal to get hired by WalMart. They had tough standards for their employees, and rewarded them in kind. It was a store that had brought many different stores under one roof – but it wasn’t necessarily cheaper. It was just a convenience thing.
    Compare that to modern WalMart. Now, stores are deliberately built within miles of one another to drive out local competition. Once that competition is gone, one store is usually the clear favorite, and the other store is mothballed – to sit empty, since WalMart will not sell their former stores to anyone deemed competition. In some cases, these stores have gotten so blighted, they’ve ended up being torn down with taxpayer money. We’ve seen this happen here in town (not necessarily the taxpayer tear-down, but the empty space) – I know I’ve seen it happen in other towns.
    WalMart DOES censor – they’ve admitted to that censorship, in the guise of creating a more “family friendly” environment. It makes me uncomfortable when a corporation wants to be my parent, or to parent. Because they are so very huge, record labels, magazines, books and such have either changed their cover/content entirely, or create a separate “WalMart” version. So, in all those small towns, where WalMart has driven out competition, and the vast majority of folks do all their shopping there – do they realize their choices are limited? Pema Chodron has some of the bestselling religion/spirituality books on Amazon – has anyone ever seen one of her books in a WalMart, the largest box store in the world? I’ve never seen a book there on anything but conventional Christianity, or generally very conservative values. And yup, it’s WalMart’s choice to limit selection in any way they please, but it makes me very uncomfortable to have them make those kinds of choices. Especially considering that they deliberately limit the choices of shopping locations in smaller towns.
    It’s taking me too long to articulate this – I’m sure ya’ll’ve moved on to discussing why it is so many folks feel like pajama bottoms and slippers are acceptible attire in some stores, blah blah blah.
    For me, there are problems with WalMart – they’ve had class action problems with how they’ve treated women in the workplace (deliberately limiting advancement, less pay, etc), they play games with hours of employees to keep them from qualifying for insurance (this was NY, not sure of OH rules), they censor (remember the Brokeback Mountain debacle?)… and when they are the largest private employer, the largest retailer, they ARE making choices for people.

    Thank you. There are a ton of issues with this company. Some just want to turn a blind eye because of the savings. It’s quite sad actually.

    And you, martyr of spending, are so SO much better than those people.

    I don’t think so but thanks for voting. Some people just don’t have much choice in the matter.

    Walmart’s increasing drive for profits and moving into other product markets caused huge food and business ‘deserts’ in the USA – especially in small towns. Arrivals of Wal-Mart stores are particularly scary because when local business is completely smashed and profits come down (when the incomes of local communities are lowered by the decline of competitive business) the company immediately removes its store to the nearest bigger town. Most of these cases involve removing stores from a couple of smaller towns to one bigger one, hence the name ‘strategy of consolidation’. Local business cannot come back to life immediately, so people in the smaller towns are still dependent on Wal-Mart and therefore have to cover much longer distances for their shopping trips. The process thus creates more traffic as well as social dislocation.

    While others may feel that they have to shop at WM due to budget constraints.

    The battle against Wal-Mart in U.S. is about maintaining quality community living standards. The true legacy of Wal-Mart isn’t lower prices. The true legacy of Wal-Mart is lower living standards for hard working Americans and those overseas. The fact is for every Wal-Mart store that opens, jobs are lost to the community, the tax base shrinks, the number of workers with health benefits declines, and the number of workers eligible for welfare increases.

    From a study conducted by Consumer Reports: surveyed 30,666 of its readers over a year’s time, asking them to rank experiences and products at 11 retailers, including Wal-Mart. Consumer Reports issued this brief disclaimer: “Results might not reflect experiences of the U.S. population.”
    Wal-Mart will not be reprinting the Consumer Report survey on its website. The results are not very flattering—and they’re not very different from a similar survey the magazine published eight years ago.

    For openers: “Last year shoppers spent $405 billion at Wal-Mart, the world’s largest retailer. But according to a new study by the Consumer Reports National Research Center, they might be better off if they switch stores.”

    Consumers shop at Wal-Mart for one reason only: presumed low prices. But CR readers said prices at the 10 other retailers (which included JCPenney, Sears, and Target) were “at least as good.”
    Almost 75% of Wal-Mart shoppers found at least one problem to complain about, and half had two or more complaints. In terms of overall store rating, Wal-Mart finished 10th out of 11 stores, barely nosing out Kmart at dead last.

    “Wal-Mart was near the bottom of the Ratings,” CR concludes. “The number of complaints about Wal-Mart’s lines and narrow aisles was above average. About 44% of its shoppers had a problem with the staff if they sought help. Quality of apparel, jewelry, kitchenware, and electronics was rated below average.”

    #385031

    Klablut
    Member

    Ohio Subsidizes Walmart with Approximately $68.5 million Each Year
    The Ohio Department of Job and Family Services released a report on Sept. 9, 2009 ranking major employers by their employees’ reliance upon various state run programs like Medicaid and food stamps. With health care reform on the front burner of the American political agenda, this is obviously a pretty important report. It shows that large companies are shirking their responsibilities and forcing tax payers to subsidize them, and guess who was at the top of the list in Ohio.

    Walmart has more than 15,000 employees and their dependents in Ohio on Medicaid, costing state taxpayers $68 million a year. Walmart has higher Medicaid and food stamp numbers than any other company on the report.

    Walmart is attempting to convince the American people that their company is a positive force when it comes to health care. They’ve run ads, started programs, attempted to open health clinics in their stores, and more. But stories like this throw Walmart’s credibility in to question. Yet, In spite of astronomical profits, Walmart fails to cover nearly 700,000 of its employees and offers plans too costly for its average employees to afford.

    Walmart claims that only 2.6% of its employees use Medicaid. Yet, in Ohio, the number appears to be much higher.

    #385032

    gramarye
    Participant

    Well, if we got rid of Medicaid, then fewer Wal-Mart employees in Ohio would be using Medicaid, wouldn’t they?

    #385033

    Klablut
    Member

    In 2003, Californian suburb Contra Costa County managed to overturn proposals for a new Wal-Mart supercenter. Part of the evidence that went towards this decision was a study done by the San Diego County Taxpayers Association, ‘a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization.’ It found that an influx of such stores would cause an annual decline in wages and benefits between $105 million and $221 million, and an increase of $9 million in public health costs. As so few Wal-Mart workers are covered by health insurance, the taxpayer ends up paying for the health of its workers – and stacking shelves and smiling mechanically all day can’t be too good for your health. In the words of Ruth Rosen of the San Francisco Chronicle, ‘We, the customers, get such low prices and convenient shopping because we, the taxpayers, subsidize Wal-Mart profits by paying for county public health services, food stamps and social services for its retired employees.'[5]

    #385034

    Klablut
    Member

    gramarye wrote >>
    Well, if we got rid of Medicaid, then fewer Wal-Mart employees in Ohio would be using Medicaid, wouldn’t they?

    Yes – just let them get sick and die. Don’t worry, you got a get deal on _____.

    #385035
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    gramarye wrote >>
    Well, if we got rid of Medicaid, then fewer Wal-Mart employees in Ohio would be using Medicaid, wouldn’t they?

    Kinda what I was thinking.

    Also, if the idea is to get wal-mart to pay higher salaries, removing subsidies to the employees in the form of handouts like food stamps and medicaid would change the equation.

    Of course, I’m also wondering if dougz/pilsner got a new name…

    #385036

    gramarye
    Participant

    Klablut wrote >>
    Wal-Mart will not be reprinting the Consumer Report survey on its website. The results are not very flattering—and they’re not very different from a similar survey the magazine published eight years ago.
    For openers: “Last year shoppers spent $405 billion at Wal-Mart, the world’s largest retailer. But according to a new study by the Consumer Reports National Research Center, they might be better off if they switch stores.”
    Consumers shop at Wal-Mart for one reason only: presumed low prices. But CR readers said prices at the 10 other retailers (which included JCPenney, Sears, and Target) were “at least as good.”

    In other words, other big box stores–most of which probably don’t have pay and benefit scales all that different from Wal-Mart. In addition, it’s entirely plausible–indeed, in some quarters, almost assumed–that these competitors of Wal-Mart’s have lowered their prices in order to compete with Wal-Mart, meaning that the prices would be higher if Wal-Mart weren’t there. This is a doubly salutary effect, as it means that consumers enjoy lower prices not just at Wal-Mart, but at its competitors as well.

    Almost 75% of Wal-Mart shoppers found at least one problem to complain about, and half had two or more complaints. In terms of overall store rating, Wal-Mart finished 10th out of 11 stores, barely nosing out Kmart at dead last.
    “Wal-Mart was near the bottom of the Ratings,” CR concludes. “The number of complaints about Wal-Mart’s lines and narrow aisles was above average. About 44% of its shoppers had a problem with the staff if they sought help. Quality of apparel, jewelry, kitchenware, and electronics was rated below average.”

    As we’ve already established, you don’t shop at Wal-Mart for the customer service experience. If you want to (and can) pay extra for that, go to Nordstrom or Giant Eagle or Bed Bath & Beyond. I’ve seen overworked and overstressed cashiers give bad customer service at the local Aldi and Save-a-Lot, too, but somehow Wal-Mart gets all the bad press.

    #385037

    gramarye
    Participant

    Klablut wrote >>

    gramarye wrote >>
    Well, if we got rid of Medicaid, then fewer Wal-Mart employees in Ohio would be using Medicaid, wouldn’t they?

    Yes – just let them get sick and die. Don’t worry, you got a get deal on _____.

    It is not my place to “let” them do anything. It is, however (or at least should be), their responsibility to provide for their own health care.

    #385038
    Snarf
    Snarf
    Participant

    Klablut wrote >>

    Snarf wrote >>

    Klablut wrote >>

    Twixlen wrote >>
    I “get” what both sides of this arguement are saying…. because I’ve felt both things. I mean, if someone is willing and able to sell something at a cheaper price than other folks in town with the same items, why on earth wouldn’t I take advantage of that? That’s the free market. Also, why do I care what WalMart does or doesn’t carry – what their own corporate culture deems as vulgar or appropriate – since I can find whatever I want in other stores or on the internet?
    And yet, I have a problem with it. I remember when WalMart came to the nearest town when I was a kid – how excited we were. It was a tiny store by today’s standards (this is mid/late 1970’s), and it was a big deal to get hired by WalMart. They had tough standards for their employees, and rewarded them in kind. It was a store that had brought many different stores under one roof – but it wasn’t necessarily cheaper. It was just a convenience thing.
    Compare that to modern WalMart. Now, stores are deliberately built within miles of one another to drive out local competition. Once that competition is gone, one store is usually the clear favorite, and the other store is mothballed – to sit empty, since WalMart will not sell their former stores to anyone deemed competition. In some cases, these stores have gotten so blighted, they’ve ended up being torn down with taxpayer money. We’ve seen this happen here in town (not necessarily the taxpayer tear-down, but the empty space) – I know I’ve seen it happen in other towns.
    WalMart DOES censor – they’ve admitted to that censorship, in the guise of creating a more “family friendly” environment. It makes me uncomfortable when a corporation wants to be my parent, or to parent. Because they are so very huge, record labels, magazines, books and such have either changed their cover/content entirely, or create a separate “WalMart” version. So, in all those small towns, where WalMart has driven out competition, and the vast majority of folks do all their shopping there – do they realize their choices are limited? Pema Chodron has some of the bestselling religion/spirituality books on Amazon – has anyone ever seen one of her books in a WalMart, the largest box store in the world? I’ve never seen a book there on anything but conventional Christianity, or generally very conservative values. And yup, it’s WalMart’s choice to limit selection in any way they please, but it makes me very uncomfortable to have them make those kinds of choices. Especially considering that they deliberately limit the choices of shopping locations in smaller towns.
    It’s taking me too long to articulate this – I’m sure ya’ll’ve moved on to discussing why it is so many folks feel like pajama bottoms and slippers are acceptible attire in some stores, blah blah blah.
    For me, there are problems with WalMart – they’ve had class action problems with how they’ve treated women in the workplace (deliberately limiting advancement, less pay, etc), they play games with hours of employees to keep them from qualifying for insurance (this was NY, not sure of OH rules), they censor (remember the Brokeback Mountain debacle?)… and when they are the largest private employer, the largest retailer, they ARE making choices for people.

    Thank you. There are a ton of issues with this company. Some just want to turn a blind eye because of the savings. It’s quite sad actually.

    And you, martyr of spending, are so SO much better than those people.

    I don’t think so but thanks for voting. Some people just don’t have much choice in the matter.
    Walmart’s increasing drive for profits and moving into other product markets caused huge food and business ‘deserts’ in the USA – especially in small towns. Arrivals of Wal-Mart stores are particularly scary because when local business is completely smashed and profits come down (when the incomes of local communities are lowered by the decline of competitive business) the company immediately removes its store to the nearest bigger town. Most of these cases involve removing stores from a couple of smaller towns to one bigger one, hence the name ‘strategy of consolidation’. Local business cannot come back to life immediately, so people in the smaller towns are still dependent on Wal-Mart and therefore have to cover much longer distances for their shopping trips. The process thus creates more traffic as well as social dislocation.
    While others may feel that they have to shop at WM due to budget constraints.
    The battle against Wal-Mart in U.S. is about maintaining quality community living standards. The true legacy of Wal-Mart isn’t lower prices. The true legacy of Wal-Mart is lower living standards for hard working Americans and those overseas. The fact is for every Wal-Mart store that opens, jobs are lost to the community, the tax base shrinks, the number of workers with health benefits declines, and the number of workers eligible for welfare increases.
    From a study conducted by Consumer Reports: surveyed 30,666 of its readers over a year’s time, asking them to rank experiences and products at 11 retailers, including Wal-Mart. Consumer Reports issued this brief disclaimer: “Results might not reflect experiences of the U.S. population.”
    Wal-Mart will not be reprinting the Consumer Report survey on its website. The results are not very flattering—and they’re not very different from a similar survey the magazine published eight years ago.
    For openers: “Last year shoppers spent $405 billion at Wal-Mart, the world’s largest retailer. But according to a new study by the Consumer Reports National Research Center, they might be better off if they switch stores.”
    Consumers shop at Wal-Mart for one reason only: presumed low prices. But CR readers said prices at the 10 other retailers (which included JCPenney, Sears, and Target) were “at least as good.”
    Almost 75% of Wal-Mart shoppers found at least one problem to complain about, and half had two or more complaints. In terms of overall store rating, Wal-Mart finished 10th out of 11 stores, barely nosing out Kmart at dead last.
    “Wal-Mart was near the bottom of the Ratings,” CR concludes. “The number of complaints about Wal-Mart’s lines and narrow aisles was above average. About 44% of its shoppers had a problem with the staff if they sought help. Quality of apparel, jewelry, kitchenware, and electronics was rated below average.”

    Too long, didn’t read.

Viewing 15 posts - 151 through 165 (of 269 total)

The forum ‘Shopping’ is closed to new topics and replies.

Subscribe below: