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WalMart is "Going Urban" with New Stores

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Shopping WalMart is “Going Urban” with New Stores

Viewing 15 posts - 136 through 150 (of 269 total)
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  • #385009

    Bear
    Participant

    gramarye wrote >>
    I’ve raised this issue at several points in the past, too. Jeni’s has been expanding rapidly, and I say *good* … I can now get her products in Akron, which I couldn’t until just a few months ago. If she opened a parlor here, I’d be the last person saying “down with chains!” and the first person trying to gather as many people from my office to try it out (and hopefully get them hooked, feeding the rapacious capitalist machine that is Jeni’s and the rapacious ice-cream eating monster that is, well, me). Bricco is another restaurant up here that is becoming a chain, and I say good for them. At some point, Liz Lessner will be Cameron Mitchell, Tigertree will be American Apparel (or some other quirky clothing retailer), and Bill and Peggy will be Pizza Hut, and we’ll all have to start hating on them, too.

    Interesting examples… and possibly ideal test cases. Has anyone here actually complained about American Apparel? If so, I don’t remember it. Or you could throw in Chipotle instead of Pizza Hut and, I suspect, have an equally difficult time finding people hating on that corporation just because of its size. All in all, in cases in which you can disentangle the size of the corporation and the values and practices that it represents, I suspect most people are reacting to the latter rather than the former (though admittedly, some, a minority I suspect, take the former to be a proxy for the latter). ymmv

    #385010

    Mercurius
    Participant

    Another thing to consider is Wal-Mart has vastly reduced their environmental/energy use impact and vastly increased their labor standards in recent years. Target was never in a position that it needed to do this. This was Target’s default to start with. While Wal-Mart was self admittedly late to the game of corporate responsibility, they played catch-up fast and are now trend setters in many energy and environmental initiatives related to logistics and retail.

    #385011

    Nitsud Regnifloh
    Participant

    berdawn wrote >>

    Tenzo wrote >>
    1) If you don’t like what walmart sells, don’t buy it. It’s not like it’s the only place in town.

    except those towns where it is.

    then i guess you’ll be driving, errr, biking to the nearest town then, huh??

    #385012
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    Mercurius wrote >>
    Another thing to consider is Wal-Mart has vastly reduced their environmental/energy use impact and vastly increased their labor standards in recent years. Target was never in a position that it needed to do this. This was Target’s default to start with. While Wal-Mart was self admittedly late to the game of corporate responsibility, they played catch-up fast and are now trend setters in many energy and environmental initiatives related to logistics and retail.

    Think that was mentioned in one of the links you posted; they’ve invested in more fuel efficient trucks, reduced packaging, etc. .

    One of those “good for the bottom line and good for the environment” situations.

    #385013

    Mercurius
    Participant

    rus wrote >>

    Mercurius wrote >>
    Another thing to consider is Wal-Mart has vastly reduced their environmental/energy use impact and vastly increased their labor standards in recent years. Target was never in a position that it needed to do this. This was Target’s default to start with. While Wal-Mart was self admittedly late to the game of corporate responsibility, they played catch-up fast and are now trend setters in many energy and environmental initiatives related to logistics and retail.

    One of those “good for the bottom line and good for the environment” situations.

    If you have a long term plan for returns of investment and add market externalities to your balance sheet, all sustainable initiatives are good for the bottom line. Ask BP.

    #385014

    Bear
    Participant

    rus wrote >>
    You want to pretend snobbery has nothing to do with dislike of Wal-Mart when places like target, which have similar labor policies and marketing strategies, are given a pass you go right ahead.

    If you’ve defined any dislike of Wal-Mart as snobbery, your argument is tautological.

    But if evidence is relevant, what I’ve seen doesn’t bear out the argument that class hatred drives people to look at peopleofwalmart.com.

    On the other hand, class hatred does seem to drive people who deride those people: yet another example of the wisdom of the point that, when you claim that you know why people are doing what they’re doing, it tells me more about you than it does about them.

    #385015

    manticore33
    Participant

    Typically when you are the biggest, you will attract naysayers and critics. And it is often easier to imitate then to create your own. This is exactly what Target has done. Taking the big-box Wal-Mart approach and repackaged it under the guidelines of being more responsible to create product / store differentiation. However, WalMart has been responsive and is transforming itself (new logo, better styling, more premium products, online-retailing, etc).

    Following the Japanese automakers’ example, Hyundai is currently doing the same thing by imitating a more expensive products, note Mercedes/BMW/Lexus like looks, but offering them at lower cost. Then demonstrating quality through generous warranties.

    #385016

    Twixlen
    Participant

    So why are most of WalMart’s employees falling below the poverty line? I can’t see that they would pay THAT much more at Target/Meijer/other, but you never hear that accusation of those employers. Is it just because they are so big?

    I mean, I realize that most of the WalMart employees are women, and likely single parents at that – could it be that simple? A demographic, as opposed to some other financial discrepancy?

    ETA: I’m not trying to be surly here – it’s something I’ve heard mentioned, and even though WalMart isn’t my fave place, it seems like a hefty thing to have pinned on one company. It has to be more complicated than “low pay”.

    #385017

    joev
    Participant

    I’ll tell you the number one reason I don’t shop much at Walmart: The service is terrible. Checkouts are the slow as molasses, even with 18 lanes open. It’s rare to find a cashier who knows what the vegetables I buy are, so they can ring up the proper PLU code. Maybe if they paid better, they could motivate their staff a little more. Not to say every Walmart employee is lazy or slow, but I’ve noticed it more at Walmart.

    For stuff like food, the offerings are pretty indistinguishable from Kroger or Giant Eagle (and the prices are often much better.) The quality of more durable goods (cookware, towels, bedding, hardware, etc.) isn’t worth the low cost to me. I’d rather pay more for something of better quality that would last longer and serve me better.

    #385018

    Cookie
    Member

    joev wrote >>
    The quality of more durable goods (cookware, towels, bedding, hardware, etc.) isn’t worth the low cost to me. I’d rather pay more for something of better quality that would last longer and serve me better.

    I’ve actually been meaning to buy this Tramontina set ever since Cooks Illustrated reviewed it, and I just might have to do it now at that price.

    #385019

    JoeMitchell
    Member

    customer service at walmart is awesome, a model for all industries

    I get this line from the inlaws, “went over to Walmart to buy (insert random small electronic) you can’t find anyone who knows a thing”

    um yeah it’s Walmart

    they do have an awesome return policy though, 90 days no questions asked, a few years ago we stepped up to an HDTV, bought it the day before the first osu/usc game then returned it on black friday for a better model and savings

    #385020

    gramarye
    Participant

    joev wrote >>
    I’ll tell you the number one reason I don’t shop much at Walmart: The service is terrible. Checkouts are the slow as molasses, even with 18 lanes open. It’s rare to find a cashier who knows what the vegetables I buy are, so they can ring up the proper PLU code. Maybe if they paid better, they could motivate their staff a little more. Not to say every Walmart employee is lazy or slow, but I’ve noticed it more at Walmart.

    This is a legitimate concern. I’ve encountered the same thing at Wal-Mart … not every time I go, but frequently enough to notice. However, I don’t necessarily think it’s the pay that’s responsible. I think that customer service is simply a much smaller part of the average Wal-Mart employee’s job, so it’s underemphasized compared with higher-end places.

    For stuff like food, the offerings are pretty indistinguishable from Kroger or Giant Eagle (and the prices are often much better.) The quality of more durable goods (cookware, towels, bedding, hardware, etc.) isn’t worth the low cost to me. I’d rather pay more for something of better quality that would last longer and serve me better.

    Same. Most of my bedding and bath goods came from, appropriately, Bed Bath & Beyond (with those ubiquitous 20%-off coupons, which they recently degraded … but that’s another topic). The cookware set that I have from school is from Wal-Mart, but my better kitchen stuff is BB&B now, too. Likewise, I don’t think I own any clothes from Wal-Mart … maybe some socks or something.

    Online retail also offers a real threat to Wal-Mart as well. One-stop shopping is less important when you’re on the Internet, since the real “stop” is your computer; going from one Web site to another is easier than going from one brick-and-mortar store to another. For example, I used to pick up office supplies at Wal-Mart, but I’ll use Quill now.

    However, we’re talking specifically about the prospect of an urban Wal-Mart here, maybe even as small as 8000sf (though I would hope it would be larger than that, or it wouldn’t be that much more than the CVS that downtown Columbus already has). I think it could fill a lot of voids that downtown Columbus currently lacks, and it doesn’t *need* to fill “voids” that aren’t voids at all because they’re already covered by the North Market and other downtown establishments.

    #385021

    dru
    Participant

    gramarye wrote Bed Bath & Beyond (with those ubiquitous 20%-off coupons, which they recently degraded … but that’s another topic)..

    i know, what’s up with them not letting me horde those things for months and cashing them in on things like Brita filters? i would be offended that the value now has a date it drops to 10%, except i know they will send me about 3 more in that time frame.

    #385022

    Elizabeth Lessner
    Participant

    Wal Mart is best experienced with a slight buzz at 4am. This exactly why downtown Columbus needs one.

    After hours enertainment, more people out late downtown, more funny Wal Mart stories, more sales tax for the county.

    #385023

    Columbusite
    Member

    While I’m not crazy about Walmart I can see an increase in visitors to local businesses, since they’re not going to put the downtown mom n’ pop electronics/dvd/cd/video game/home furnishing/clothing/hunting/toy/etc store out of business. There are plenty of spots for a mini version in downtown proper, along with parking.

Viewing 15 posts - 136 through 150 (of 269 total)

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