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New 5-Story Mixed-Use Development Proposed for High Street

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Development New 5-Story Mixed-Use Development Proposed for High Street

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  • #461814

    labi
    Participant

    In case you’re interested, or live in the University Area and would like to weigh in, the University Area Commission’s zoning committee will be considering requested variances for this development at their next meeting.

    The meeting date is next Wednesday, Oct. 12 at the Pride Center at 248 E. 11th Ave. The 7th and High applicant is expected to present at approximately 7:45 PM. The UAC requests that attendees please arrive at least 15 minutes prior to the hearing time in case earlier cases run faster than scheduled.

    #461815

    Pablo
    Participant

    Looks like in early January the Univ. Area Commission shot down the variance request to increase building height from 35′ to 75′:

    Increase the allowable height from 35 ft. to 75 ft. – There was much discussion regarding the Commission’s past votes on requests to increase the allowable height in the University District. It was noted that height increases have been allowed. Dick Talbot presented the Weinland Park Plan which stipulates a 1-3 stories max. building height, and a 0 ft. setback for buildings on the property @ 7th & High Streets.
    Vote: 1 yes 4 no – Motion failed

    http://www.universityareacommission.info/

    I don’t know if this killed the project or if there are other avenues the developer can take. Also, I don’t know if the project works financially if it’s only 3 floors. Apparently there was a presentation to Weinland Park residents – did anyone attend?

    I noticed in the same meeting minutes the commission shot down two other projects that exceeded the 35′ height (or 3 story height). I wondering if that’s a bad thing in general? To me, the added density is a good thing and all these projects addressed parking with garages.

    #461816

    mrpoppinzs
    Member

    Seems the knitting circles are at work. I can’t imagine why a 75′ building would not work so close to the Gateway on High St.

    Word on the street is that some of the peeps are unhappy about the Walgreens. It would be nearsighted to kill such an ambitious project over matter program.

    #461817

    labi
    Participant

    Last night, the BZA approved the height variance and the variance to use mesh instead of solid glass in the 2nd-floor (parking area) windows.

    As has been stated in many other threads, University Area Commission can make recommendations, but does not have legal authority over other city bodies.

    #461818

    labi
    Participant

    mrpoppinzs said:
    Seems the knitting circles are at work. I can’t imagine why a 75′ building would not work so close to the Gateway on High St.

    I like density, too, but in regards to this project, I’m tired of hearing how it ought to be approved because the Gateway was. It’s not “so close” to the Gateway, it’s four blocks away. We’re not talking a minor variance here, we’re talking almost doubling the stated preferences for height in that area. It will absolutely dwarf everything around it, including every historic structure – as well as the new retail that Kroger is putting in across 7th, the just-built retail across Euclid to the north, and the Northside Library across the street, none of which are likely to be replaced anytime soon.

    The University Area Plan and the Weinland Park Plan, which god knows had a lot of thought and public input put into them, both say 3 stories max, with specific exceptions for the corners of 11th & High and 15th & High to accommodated planned higher density at those two locations. One might wonder why anyone should even bother making such plans, if it’s clear that others in the city will simply overrule the residents’ clearly stated desire in this way.

    My understanding is that the University Area Commission is restarting a broad internal discussion about height along High Street, in an attempt to shape development in a coordinated way, rather than just having variances like this approved piecemeal.

    #461819

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    labi said:
    I like density, too, but in regards to this project, I’m tired of hearing how it ought to be approved because the Gateway was. It’s not “so close” to the Gateway, it’s four blocks away. We’re not talking a minor variance here, we’re talking almost doubling the stated preferences for height in that area. It will absolutely dwarf everything around it, including every historic structure – as well as the new retail that Kroger is putting in across 7th, the just-built retail across Euclid to the north, and the Northside Library across the street, none of which are likely to be replaced anytime soon.

    The University Area Plan and the Weinland Park Plan, which god knows had a lot of thought and public input put into them, both say 3 stories max, with specific exceptions for the corners of 11th & High and 15th & High to accommodated planned higher density at those two locations. One might wonder why anyone should even bother making such plans, if it’s clear that others in the city will simply overrule the residents’ clearly stated desire in this way.

    My understanding is that the University Area Commission is restarting a broad internal discussion about height along High Street, in an attempt to shape development in a coordinated way, rather than just having variances like this approved piecemeal.

    Specifically, why does development all have to be the same height on what is arguably the most important road in Columbus? We’re not talking about a 5-story in the middle of a single-family residential neighborhood, but a busy and steadily improving business corridor. There absolutely should be high density development along it.

    #461820

    mrpoppinzs
    Member

    labi said:
    Nor is there exactly an apartment shortage in the area.

    I am not entirely sure what the fear this will do to the local rental market is about. I think there is plenty of room for rentals in the area – especially along High Street. I think this would appeal to upperclassmen and just graduated YP’s looking for a shiny new, maintenance free place. There are plenty of older apartments in WP, but this has a different appeal. I am confident they will rent out quickly.

    #461821

    surber17
    Participant

    labi said:
    Last night, the BZA approved the height variance and the variance to use mesh instead of solid glass in the 2nd-floor (parking area) windows.

    As has been stated in many other threads, University Area Commission can make recommendations, but does not have legal authority over other city bodies.

    So wait, this building is approved to be built or not? And I agree, 5 stories on the city’s busiest street shouldn’t be an issue. The Jackson looks great and only enhances the neighborhood.

    #461822

    Urban Dansigner
    Participant

    The BZA approval means they will be able to vary from the Zoning Code those items they where granted relief by the BZA. They will still need a Certificate of Approval from the University Area Review Board prior to submitting for Zoning Clearance and Building Permit.

    #461823

    wpcc88
    Participant

    I think that this is great, it will be a great option for grad students. It will be closer to SN/Downtown and is another stepping stone in turning the Weinland Park neighborhood around. But I do not think that putting sophomores in the dorms will turn the ‘University Area’ neighboorhood into a section 8 haven. Because to be quite honest I don’t think they will be able to keep all sophomores in the dorms. I know people that don’t go to places like OU because of this very thing. But with the hospital expanding I think that will keep the area focused on the college student market.

    #461824

    Pablo
    Participant

    surber17 said:
    So wait, this building is approved to be built or not? And I agree, 5 stories on the city’s busiest street shouldn’t be an issue. The Jackson looks great and only enhances the neighborhood.

    Good news indeed in my opinion. I agree that 5 stories on High St. shouldn’t be an issue.

    #461825

    cbus11
    Member

    I really do not see a 5 story building on High being an issue. I think this project is a good fit (though I hope someday an Apple Store goes in where the Walgreens will be).

    If we are letting what is there now dictate the future then we really need to rethink things.

    #461826

    labi
    Participant

    Urban Dansigner said:
    The BZA approval means they will be able to vary from the Zoning Code those items they where granted relief by the BZA. They will still need a Certificate of Approval from the University Area Review Board prior to submitting for Zoning Clearance and Building Permit.

    My understanding is that they got approved by the UARB.

    #461827

    lurker
    Member

    labi said:
    I like density, too, but in regards to this project, I’m tired of hearing how it ought to be approved because the Gateway was. It’s not “so close” to the Gateway, it’s four blocks away.

    Gateway extends to E 9th Avenue, and is set to expand south on the west side of high street. So, it’s 4 blocks, not 2. I would call that close.

    #461828
    Jason Powell
    Jason Powell
    Participant

    Yea, because it makes total sense to have a one story building fronting the commercial spine of our city. As many have already said, what is the problem with a 5 story building? If anything, the add’l residents adds extra feet on the street and potential patrons to nearby businesses. There is only a small amount of vacant space left on High St. and it should be utilized as best as possible. Does this city have a problem with density or something!? It seems like there is an issue with height with just about everything that is proposed in our core. For one thing, developers need to utilize the land at its highest use in order to at least break even, which means higher densities. Secondly, I hate seeing the same height along stretches. How boring. Different heights breaks up the monotony and keeps things interesting. Thirdly, the more dense a city is, the vibrant it is, the more businesses will open up, the more people will utilize mass transit, the more feet on the street. Maybe our city officials should start taking city planning courses. That’s not intended to be an asshole remark. I’m just saying, city building is an art and times have changed. I’ve witnessed way too many developments throughout the past 10 years that are completely out of touch and insular to their respective neighborhoods. I really hope they keep it at 5 floors.

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