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Urban Grocery Store Concept in the Short North

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Development Urban Grocery Store Concept in the Short North

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 67 total)
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  • #1107814

    Nancy H
    Participant

    I don’t see any kind of real urban grocery moving into a spot on High Street other than a couple of possible locations. The Dollar Store location (which DS owns) being one of the exceptions. Like everybody else, a grocery would want some on site parking. The biggest hurdle is the volume of deliveries they require. Wall and Pearl are not semi-truck friendly.

    IF someone added an urban grocery in the SN it probably would not be GE or K. But, there are lots of other companies looking to expand their market.

    What we need is a developer willing to pursue a grocer as an anchor tenant. If we were to petition someone, Wagenbrenner or Borror would be a better bet.

    #1107819

    CB_downtowner
    Participant

    I hate to rain on the parade, but with a newer Kroger (just a mile up high from Goodale and High, the beginning of the short north) and a new Giant Eagle Market district (just about 1.2 mi west of High), plus the older Giant Eagle on Neil even closer I don’t really see a another grocer in the short north. I think something super specialized like the Market in Italian Village is the extent of what we’re going to get.

    I could see something like a CVS or a Walgreens taking up residence in the first floor of one of the newer buildings, but I think that’s as close as you’ll get to a grocery store. Also if this happens get ready for roughly a million comments on the death of the short north and a nostalgia for crime and decay that I’ll never understand.

    This. There is a Kroger near campus and a giant eagle off Neil. North market is a quick jump from the cbus and hills from summit. There are tons of options for this area.

    #1107820
    MichaelC
    MichaelC
    Participant

    I think everyone has been saying this for years but will people actually shop at a micro urban grocery store?

    Also people like to bring up the sunflower place that went under at the gateway.

    If it were up to me, we’d have little bodega shops on every corner it the grocery essentials. There are plenty of vacant shops throughout Victorian Village and Italian Village that would be perfect. Yet in my heart of hearts I doubt the masses would take to them and would rather get in their cars and drive to the major players for their gas points and favorite shower gel.

    I think the key with the Sunflower place was the business sense of putting an expensive store at the southern tip of student housing.

    And as to what the masses will do: That’s why using a Kroger concept, where those perks can still be attained, affordability would still exist, and an Ohio-based business would still be supported, might make the most sense.

    #1107823
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Also people like to bring up the sunflower place that went under at the gateway.

    I think the key with the Sunflower place was the business sense of putting an expensive store at the southern tip of student housing.

    People regularly mis-remember this bit of history. Sunflower didn’t close at the South Campus Gateway because of that location… they closed ALL STORES simultaneously because the parent company (SuperValu) deemed it a failed experiment. That includes a second local store on Bethel Road, as well as locations in Indianapolis and Chicago:

    https://www.columbusunderground.com/sunflower-market-stores-going-out-of-business

    #1107834
    MichaelC
    MichaelC
    Participant

    Yes, but it wasn’t exactly humming prior to all the stores closing, either.

    #1107836
    lazyfish
    lazyfish
    Participant

    never understood the allure of Traders Joe’s. I get the cheap wine, but as far as food goes not that impressed, seems one step above Aldi’s, which I understand actually had real produce now.

    #1107868
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Yes, but it wasn’t exactly humming prior to all the stores closing, either.

    I only popped in once or twice and I recall it being medium-busy but never packed.

    Of course, at that point in time, the same could be said about the Short North Kroger. A lot of students were fearful to go there, and the produce section was often swarming with fruit flies. Was not pretty.

    #1107872

    Nancy H
    Participant

    I suspect those of you who think our existing grocery options are close enough have never walked, biked or CBUSed their grocery needs. If you are young, live alone and eat most of your meals out… maybe.

    Off the top of my head, I know Walker and mbeaumont live in urban areas and have children… maybe one of them will chime in with comments on their ability to walk, bike or bus home their average weekly grocery needs from the nearest grocer.

    #1107879
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Off the top of my head, I know Walker and mbeaumont live in urban areas and have children… maybe one of them will chime in with comments on their ability to walk, bike or bus home their average weekly grocery needs from the nearest grocer.

    I can only speak for myself, but it’s a mix of transit for us when it comes to groceries. We’ll often pop into Hills Market or the North Market for quick items throughout the week, either on foot or by bike. The bigger trip to Kroger or Target for a larger purchase usually comes on the weekends (or at night) and is by car (and is often part of a multitasking trip).

    Of course, without kids, the bigger trips would be fewer.

    And if we had a grocery store closer (the Near East Side is lacking) then I imagine that would change shopping transit choices as well. We’re not as close to as many options as many people in the Short North are.

    #1107906
    MichaelC
    MichaelC
    Participant

    I’m in the camp that believes our grocery options are not sufficiently walkable.

    When I lived in the Short North, I would drive to either the Giant Eagle or the Kroger’s, because carrying grocery items, or toting them on the bus, was not preferable.

    Living downtown, my wife and I will walk to and from the Hills for a handful of items. It’s just too expensive to buy too much there that isn’t needed in the next 12 hours. If the Hills were more affordable, we’d have invested in one of these by now.

    Otherwise, we’re driving to either the Giant Eagle or the Kroger in GV. And recently, to save time, we’re ordering ahead at Giant Eagle in Grandview, and picking them up in the car.

    #1107914
    King Gambrinus
    King Gambrinus
    Participant

    I understand a mile or more isn’t the most walkable solution. I was just trying to make the point that with these massive grocery investments so close it’s not likely to see something pop up in the middle.

    Personally I enjoy living in a walkable neighborhood, but groceries are one of the things I don’t mind driving to. It’s just easier to shop at a larger store and load up the trunk of a car. Granted I’m just a single dude so I don’t have to make that trip very often.

    Outside of the Short North I could see something like an urban Target doing well in two25 or some other downtown location close to river south.

    #1107962

    WJT
    Participant

    I would really like to see one of those ‘city’ or ‘urban’ Targets set up somewhere downtown or in the Short North. Either Downtown (office workers + new residents) or close enough to OSU so it could draw in students maybe.

    #1108001

    CB_downtowner
    Participant

    I suspect those of you who think our existing grocery options are close enough have never walked, biked or CBUSed their grocery needs. If you are young, live alone and eat most of your meals out… maybe.

    Off the top of my head, I know Walker and mbeaumont live in urban areas and have children… maybe one of them will chime in with comments on their ability to walk, bike or bus home their average weekly grocery needs from the nearest grocer.

    The question is what degree of walkability is reasonable? Of course I’d love perfectly walkable options downtown. But frankly, I think I’m spoiled by the number of options. Maybe it’s my personal experience, but having lived in several metros and similar sized cities, this is by a mile the most convenient in terms of getting to grocery stores.

    As a single guy who buys a lot of groceries, I’ve biked and cbus’ed without issue. Only for small runs. But I suspect that for large runs how could you walk even 10 minutes without needing to push a shopping cart?

    #1108084

    Nancy H
    Participant

    I did some digging online but can’t find details on the scaled down Target stores. Many of the full size Target stores have groceries too. An urban Target that also had groceries would be a great fit.

    An ideal urban area has young single people, middle ages with children, empty nesters, some seniors and a sprinkling of subsidized housing. Younger people and empty nesters might bike to a grocery but it is impractical for someone with small children and most seniors. So, public transit access is significant if it is to serve the entire urban population.

    The walkability factor is probably not distance but time. No matter how you get there – walk a couple blocks and bus a few more, with or without one of those “granny carts” MichaelC linked. Or even baskets on a bike. Time is the biggest factor. In the hot summer months perishables will perish in 30 minutes. And pushing a granny cart along a snow covered sidewalk gets difficult.

    I am still hoping for something on Summit or Fourth because those streets cut through the more dense and diverse residential population areas. The residential part of High Street is predominately younger residents and they are more capable of walking an extra block or so. A grocery on Summit or Fourth is also more accessible to the residents along Gay and Long downtown. If someone is living on or close to High Street they already have good access to the Krogers in the Brewery District and at King & High.

    #1108088

    CB_downtowner
    Participant

    I did some digging online but can’t find details on the scaled down Target stores. Many of the full size Target stores have groceries too. An urban Target that also had groceries would be a great fit.

    An ideal urban area has young single people, middle ages with children, empty nesters, some seniors and a sprinkling of subsidized housing. Younger people and empty nesters might bike to a grocery but it is impractical for someone with small children and most seniors. So, public transit access is significant if it is to serve the entire urban population.

    The walkability factor is probably not distance but time. No matter how you get there – walk a couple blocks and bus a few more, with or without one of those “granny carts” MichaelC linked. Or even baskets on a bike. Time is the biggest factor. In the hot summer months perishables will perish in 30 minutes. And pushing a granny cart along a snow covered sidewalk gets difficult.

    I am still hoping for something on Summit or Fourth because those streets cut through the more dense and diverse residential population areas. The residential part of High Street is predominately younger residents and they are more capable of walking an extra block or so. A grocery on Summit or Fourth is also more accessible to the residents along Gay and Long downtown. If someone is living on or close to High Street they already have good access to the Krogers in the Brewery District and at King & High.

    I would agree. If we’re looking at grocery retail this is much more the direction I’d want to look in. It would also be a nice option for convention center visitors staying nearby.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 67 total)

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