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Two25 17 Story High Rise Proposed for SE Columbus Commons

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Development Two25 17 Story High Rise Proposed for SE Columbus Commons

This topic contains 303 replies, has 60 voices, and was last updated by  Mike88 3 years, 2 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 304 total)
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  • #1068707

    Mike88
    Participant

    Anyone have specific questions for the developers (Kaufman/Daimler)? We’re reaching out to talk to them more about this news this afternoon. ;)

    Will the residential units include private outdoor space in the form of balaconies off the units?

    Will there be any sort of rooftop common space for the residential units? (e.g. the jefferson)

    Will all residential units be for rent or will there potentially be for sale condos?

    And finally what pricepoints are they considering for all units, residential/commercial/office space

    And also give the guy a high five for bringing another high rise to downtown.

    #1068708
    Stephen43215
    Stephen43215
    Participant

    Love! Can you please try to get some different renderings from other angles Walker?

    #1068709

    ohbr
    Participant

    I don’t think the skywalk is going to have any negative effect on street activation. If we’re talking about a skylink that takes you an entire block or more without being exposed to the street, that would be an issue but if it serves the purpose of getting you from the garage to an office floor where your only option is to go to the office, go to the apartments, or be forced down to the commons, it shouldn’t be that much of a problem. It will be less of a problem if it’s for employees and residents only. I’d rather have a skywalk where you can see out the windows as to what’s around than a tunnel where you’re only looking as walls and advertisements. My guess is that the reason they are going with the garage across the street is the city has already committed as much as they want to for residents and offices in the underground garage and need to spread it out rather than that garage turn in to too much resident parking.

    #1068711
    King Gambrinus
    King Gambrinus
    Participant

    Walker could you ask about the mix of apartments vs condos? Also would it be additional office or residential demand that would drive up the height.

    On another note I really like the design of this. I agree with everyone hoping this drives development on third.

    #1068713

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    I don’t think the skywalk is going to have any negative effect on street activation. If we’re talking about a skylink that takes you an entire block or more without being exposed to the street, that would be an issue but if it serves the purpose of getting you from the garage to an office floor where your only option is to go to the office, go to the apartments, or be forced down to the commons, it shouldn’t be that much of a problem. It will be less of a problem if it’s for employees and residents only. I’d rather have a skywalk where you can see out the windows as to what’s around than a tunnel where you’re only looking as walls and advertisements. My guess is that the reason they are going with the garage across the street is the city has already committed as much as they want to for residents and offices in the underground garage and need to spread it out rather than that garage turn in to too much resident parking.

    All skywalks function as you describe, to connect one building to another, whether it be from garages to offices, or whatever. They all keep people off the street. I remember when the City Center skywalk went away, there was praise for how much better that portion of High Street looked. Now we have potentially 3 new skywalks (Convention Center Hilton, Goodale garage and now this). This is the wrong direction.

    #1068715

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    Walker could you ask about the mix of apartments vs condos? Also would it be additional office or residential demand that would drive up the height.

    On another note I really like the design of this. I agree with everyone hoping this drives development on third.

    I too would be interested to know if it would just be office demand that would take it higher. Given the very low vacancy and how fast apartments Downtown are rented, I would think that a project with even 50% more apartments would be pretty successful.

    #1068721

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    Just a footnote, but it’s interesting that the investment around the park has reached about 2x what City Center originally cost to build. $200 million vs. $100 million. Even if you discount the cost to create the Commons and the mall demolition, the whole project is ahead, and I suspect we’re only going to see more stuff coming. I’d call that success.

    #1068722

    ohbr
    Participant

    The City Center Skywalk was in a whole different category. It was a multistory, wide, monstrosity of a skywalk that made a relatively significant portion of high street dark so people who were in one large complex could get to another large complex without ever hitting the streets, the problem we both acknowledge. Akron has one too that they have an entire intersection under. I wouldn’t put the Hilton or Goodale or Even this on in the same category. I personally really like the Hilton Skywalk and that skywalk is definitely going to be a selling point to office tenants and residents. They’re going to know what’s below them for retail or lunch so they’ll still go regardless of whether they need to use the street when coming or going to the car. Even if they have to use the skywalk, there’s no guarantee that they would end up passing any street retail depending on where the business and residential entrances are. Keeping it employee and resident use only is probably the best compromise for selling point and street activity arguments. if they let everyone use of the visitors are going for the commons and what is on the street anyway. As for the City Center Skywalk the design was to keep people inside the whole time, work was inside, parking was inside, destination was inside. this skywalk offers you a destination much different than City Center mall and I think that the destination makes all the difference.

    #1068747

    Mike88
    Participant

    The City Center Skywalk was in a whole different category. It was a multistory, wide, monstrosity of a skywalk that made a relatively significant portion of high street dark so people who were in one large complex could get to another large complex without ever hitting the streets, the problem we both acknowledge. Akron has one too that they have an entire intersection under. I wouldn’t put the Hilton or Goodale or Even this on in the same category. I personally really like the Hilton Skywalk and that skywalk is definitely going to be a selling point to office tenants and residents. They’re going to know what’s below them for retail or lunch so they’ll still go regardless of whether they need to use the street when coming or going to the car. Even if they have to use the skywalk, there’s no guarantee that they would end up passing any street retail depending on where the business and residential entrances are. Keeping it employee and resident use only is probably the best compromise for selling point and street activity arguments. if they let everyone use of the visitors are going for the commons and what is on the street anyway. As for the City Center Skywalk the design was to keep people inside the whole time, work was inside, parking was inside, destination was inside. this skywalk offers you a destination much different than City Center mall and I think that the destination makes all the difference.

    +1

    #1068755

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    The City Center Skywalk was in a whole different category. It was a multistory, wide, monstrosity of a skywalk that made a relatively significant portion of high street dark so people who were in one large complex could get to another large complex without ever hitting the streets, the problem we both acknowledge. Akron has one too that they have an entire intersection under. I wouldn’t put the Hilton or Goodale or Even this on in the same category. I personally really like the Hilton Skywalk and that skywalk is definitely going to be a selling point to office tenants and residents. They’re going to know what’s below them for retail or lunch so they’ll still go regardless of whether they need to use the street when coming or going to the car. Even if they have to use the skywalk, there’s no guarantee that they would end up passing any street retail depending on where the business and residential entrances are. Keeping it employee and resident use only is probably the best compromise for selling point and street activity arguments. if they let everyone use of the visitors are going for the commons and what is on the street anyway. As for the City Center Skywalk the design was to keep people inside the whole time, work was inside, parking was inside, destination was inside. this skywalk offers you a destination much different than City Center mall and I think that the destination makes all the difference.

    I don’t buy the idea that the CC skywalk functioned any differently than any other would. Being bigger doesn’t mean it served a different purpose. Yes, it created a larger shadow on the street, but from a practical standpoint, it kept people off the street more than it would if it had never existed.

    From everything I’ve read on the matter, there is a difference in street activity when comparing businesses near skywalks and those without them. You pull people off the street, that automatically means less foot traffic passing businesses, which cancels out the spontaneous patronage. No matter what the reason is, for connection or convenience, if the goal is to increase street vibrancy, a skywalk works against it. They’re all specifically built to keep people inside.

    #1068756
    ColumbusTime
    ColumbusTime
    Participant

    Anyone have specific questions for the developers (Kaufman/Daimler)? We’re reaching out to talk to them more about this news this afternoon. ;)

    How much did Capitol South purchase the land from the City of Columbus for?

    How much did the developers purchase the property for from Capitol South?

    How were they selected to buy the property?

    Were other developers offered a chance to bid to buy the property for the highest price?

    What tax abatements or tax incentives did they ask for and/or receive?

    #1068762

    scottymac
    Participant

    As a Columbus native living in Chicago for the past 7 years, I have been a big fanatic of all things Columbus- I used to walk around the Arena District every day while it was being built an snuck into both the arena and arena grand theater before completion (statute of limitation should protect me now). At any rate, this project is great. As much as I love the brick theme of development so far. It is time to bring in steel and glass. Please note that the major projects in the city over the past five years have been 11-13 stories (Jackson, The Joseph, 235, etc.). Demand dictated that. Now that this building will be 17-20 stories, that will be the new benchmark for the next several projects. I would expect the next jump in height be a condo at the parking lots just east of Bicentennial Park (Milestone) overlooking the completed River Front. My guess- a 30 + story completed by 2020. BTW Columbus could make a huge national impact by developing a high rise with wood and glass construction. Check out what is being done in Vancouver with this new construction.

    #1068765

    Lu
    Participant

    How much did Capitol South purchase the land from the City of Columbus for?

    How much did the developers purchase the property for from Capitol South?

    How were they selected to buy the property?

    Were other developers offered a chance to bid to buy the property for the highest price?

    What tax abatements or tax incentives did they ask for and/or receive?

    +1. The Dispatch article says the land is being purchased for an “undisclosed sum.” Is that not public information?

    #1068776

    Mike88
    Participant

    I don’t buy the idea that the CC skywalk functioned any differently than any other would. Being bigger doesn’t mean it served a different purpose. Yes, it created a larger shadow on the street, but from a practical standpoint, it kept people off the street more than it would if it had never existed.

    From everything I’ve read on the matter, there is a difference in street activity when comparing businesses near skywalks and those without them. You pull people off the street, that automatically means less foot traffic passing businesses, which cancels out the spontaneous patronage. No matter what the reason is, for connection or convenience, if the goal is to increase street vibrancy, a skywalk works against it. They’re all specifically built to keep people inside.

    These are all fair points, with all of that in mind I would be fine eliminating access to the skywalk for office workers but if I was a resident in the building it would be a great ammentity in my mind to be able to carry groceries or whatever from my car to my house without crossing that potential busy street. Especially in winter.

    I also guess (no data so just a feeling) that the office workers would be more prone to spur of the moment purchases in the lower level shops than a resident that is living above them every day.

    #1068781

    drew
    Participant

    Can’t imagine why there’d be any problem with the skywalk, aside from an unhealthily nuance-free devotion to the urban planning dogma of the moment.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 304 total)

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