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Top 40 High Crash Intersections in Central Ohio

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Transportation Top 40 High Crash Intersections in Central Ohio

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  • #97434

    News
    Participant

    Press Release:

    MORPC Releases Top 40 High Crash Intersections

    May 31, 2013

    The Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC) released its Top 40 Regional High-Crash Intersections list for the years 2009-2011. The top 40 intersections are ranked based on a formula that considers number of crashes, traffic volume and severity. The top ten intersections include:

    1. Cleveland Avenue @ Morse Road

    2. W Broad Street/US 40 @ N Wilson Road

    3. Innis Road @ Westerville Road/SR 3

    4. Cleveland Avenue @ Oakland Park

    5. E Dublin Granville Road/SR 161 @ Maple Canyon Drive

    6. Morse Road @ Westerville Road/SR 3

    7. S Hamilton Road/SR [email protected] E Livingston Avenue

    8. E Broad Street/SR 16 @ Waggoner Road

    9. E Broad Street/SR 16 @ James Road

    10. S Central Avenue/Harrisburg Pike @ W Mound Street

    “Even though Central Ohio is growing, crashes continue to decline year by year, both in the region and among the top 40 high crash intersections. However, we still see too many people die and get injured in crashes with motor vehicles. Pedestrians and bicyclists are especially vulnerable when hit by a car,” states Robert Lawler, MORPC Transportation Director. “It is important that we continue to improve our roads and practice safer driving behavior. Crashes don’t only take an emotional and physical toll on victims and their families, but also take an economic toll on all of us through higher medical and insurance costs, lost wages, and damage to property. We encourage everyone to buckle-up, drive defensively and avoid distractions such as texting or talking on their cell phone.”

    To view the entire list of high crash intersections, please visit http://www.morpc.org/transportation/safety/safety.asp

    #543770

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    Scouting more intersections for red light cameras?

    #543771

    ToddAnders
    Blocked

    Well, as far as I can see, the News here, just reports the news. And why would the gov’t do a study to justify more tax? I’m sorry, revenue. I’m sorry again…

    #543772

    tdziemia
    Participant

    Wow, so what’s up with drivers in Northeast Columbus? Five of the six top hot spots are up in that area.

    Note the comment that crashes are declining … which could be used as an argument against cameras? (see: gun control dicussions).

    #543773
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    tdziemia said:
    Wow, so what’s up with roads in Northeast Columbus? Five of the six top hot spots are up in that area.

    Fixed that for ya. ;)

    #543774

    pez
    Participant

    tdziemia said:
    Wow, so what’s up with drivers in Northeast Columbus? Five of the six top hot spots are up in that area.

    Note the comment that crashes are declining … which could be used as an argument against cameras? (see: gun control dicussions).

    Is this accidents that actually occur at the intersections, or are these simply the closest ones when something happens? In respect to Morse Rd., which I drive several times per day between 270 and Cleveland Ave, I would say the problem is speed and the number of driveways dumping onto the road. I regularly see, and admittedly sometimes participate, in traffic going over 60 miles per hour down Morse. Many of the driveways are obscured view due to the buildings being too close to the road and parking for some businesses make it difficult to tell if a car is parked or pulling out. Add to that pedestrians that cross at any random point across 7 lanes of traffic and its no suprise that the road is higher risk.

    Interestingly, the one thing I rarely see is people running red lights at any of the intersections. There is a camera at Morse and Sunbury, but I may have seen it go off twice, ever.

    #543775

    tdziemia
    Participant

    walker said:
    tdziemia said:
    Wow, so what’s up with roads in Northeast Columbus? Five of the six top hot spots are up in that area.
    Fixed that for ya. ;)

    Valid point of view, but not sure the extent to which I’m buyin’ it. I tend to believe that when drivers are following the rules, accidents don’t tend to happen. I guess road design, etc can affect the margin of error when people are breaking the rules (for example, driving well above the speed limit).

    #543776

    tdziemia
    Participant

    pez said:
    Is this accidents that actually occur at the intersections, or are these simply the closest ones when something happens?

    It counts accidents within 250 ft of the intersection. Accidents farther away don’t get counted.

    #543777

    bucki12
    Member

    The roads up there really don’t help but I have seen a lot of super crazy driving in that section. I don’t know if it is due to the high immigrant population but from my experience there seems to be more confusion or interpretation of common driving practices. Predictability is key to avoiding driving accidents.

    #543778

    tdziemia
    Participant

    According to the details in the report, 97.4% of crashed in 2007-2009 were attributed to driver error.

    #543779

    tdziemia
    Participant

    So … digging into the report, it turns out that the list in the original post is just a ranking by total number of crashes, and DOES NOT take into account the traffic volume or crash severity (more sloppy journalism).

    If you look at the number of crashes IN RELATION TO TRAFFIC VOLUME (the way a traffic engineer or statistician would), the list changes (all the Broad St locations drop off), and gets even heavier on intersections in the northeast:

    1. Aigler/Cassady at Sunbury
    2. Cleveland at Morse
    3. E. Dublin Granville at Maple Canyon
    4. Innis at Westerville
    5. Cleveland at E. 5th
    6. Cleveland at Oakland Park
    7. Refugee at Noe-Bixby
    8. Gender at Refugee
    9. Cleveland at Dublin Granville
    10. Morse at Northtowne

    #543780

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    Most of this stuff is from the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s, is full of side friction, relatively high speeds and isn’t on a grid system. That combination usually leads to a lot of crashes. That stuff was fine before two-income/two-car households, tons more sprawl and today’s impatient, selfish, petty drivers. What can you expect when you beat on only 5 or 6 main roads going E-W (Livingston, Main, Fifth, Broad, Morse 161) and N-S (Hillard-Rome, High, Cleveland, James Hamilton) rather than spreading out the traffic much more evenly over a grid system?

    #543781

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    tdziemia said:
    So … digging into the report, it turns out that the list in the original post is just a ranking by total number of crashes, and DOES NOT take into account the traffic volume or crash severity (more sloppy journalism).

    If you look at the number of crashes IN RELATION TO TRAFFIC VOLUME (the way a traffic engineer or statistician would), the list changes (all the Broad St locations drop off), and gets even heavier on intersections in the northeast:

    1. Aigler/Cassady at Sunbury
    2. Cleveland at Morse
    3. E. Dublin Granville at Maple Canyon
    4. Innis at Westerville
    5. Cleveland at E. 5th
    6. Cleveland at Oakland Park
    7. Refugee at Noe-Bixby
    8. Gender at Refugee
    9. Cleveland at Dublin Granville
    10. Morse at Northtowne

    These are much more indicative of flawed design or traffic control of the specific intersections rather than the overall philosophy I described in my previous post.

    #543782
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    tdziemia said:
    Valid point of view, but not sure the extent to which I’m buyin’ it. I tend to believe that when drivers are following the rules, accidents don’t tend to happen. I guess road design, etc can affect the margin of error when people are breaking the rules (for example, driving well above the speed limit).

    Speeding is certainly a factor, but only part of that is due to driver choice and part of it is due to road design. Wider lanes and wider roads with few visual cues for specific speeds can cause driving at faster speeds to seem more natural. A great example of that, here:

    Clintonville Area Commission Seeks Lower Speed Limits

    That intersection at Morse & Cleveland is also full of suburban-style curb cuts for parking lots and drive-thrus at intersection businesses, most likely within 250 feet of the intersection, meaning that cars pulling in and out of those parking lots (and likely trying to cut across multiple lanes of traffic whether they’re supposed to or not) are probably culprits in a lot of the accidents recorded there.

    But I’m not a traffic engineer, so what do I know. Maybe everything needs to just be even wider with more lanes and more traffic, and then it will be safer.

    #543783
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    tdziemia said:
    According to the details in the report, 97.4% of crashed in 2007-2009 were attributed to driver error.

    Which makes me wonder just how much a factor traffic engineering is.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 27 total)

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