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Tipping inflation?

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Tipping inflation?

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  • #308083

    sugarplumclarey wrote >>
    tipping used to be 15% standard. but it’s edged up to 20%. will it increase to 25% in the coming years?

    Your question implies there is a right and a wrong amount to tip, and also that other people get to dictate what that is. If I have a good dinner in a very nice place I tip 20% or so. If it’s lunch I tip 15%, but so what? Since there really is no set rate, tip what you feel is appropriate for each situation. You can overthink this, as you can everything.

    A related suggestion, which I’ve found to be quite useful in spotting bogus charges, is that I always tip with an amount so that the total comes out even. If the bill is $38.05 I will tip maybe $6.95 for a total charge of $45.00 That makes it easy for me to skim down the charges online to see if there’s an odd total that I should examine.

    #308084

    sixyfivepercentwater wrote >>

    sugarplumclarey wrote >>
    tipping used to be 15% standard. but it’s edged up to 20%. will it increase to 25% in the coming years?

    Your question implies there is a right and a wrong amount to tip, and also that other people get to dictate what that is. If I have a good dinner in a very nice place I tip 20% or so. If it’s lunch I tip 15%, but so what? Since there really is no set rate, tip what you feel is appropriate for each situation. You can overthink this, as you can everything.

    Sixtyfive, the question doesn’t imply that at all – though I do have an opinion on the matter, obviously. It’s simple economics; the money I pay my server is creeping up alongside the price of food, so slowly the scales are “tipped” (ha ha) in favor of servers and disfavor of diners, from a purely money standpoint. You could argue that’s because inflation in general is driving food prices, but I’d counter that food price inflation specifically is far above & beyond cost of living. Of course you could tell me to suck it up and not eat out if that’s the case, and you’d be right. Eating out has become a privilege for those who can afford it. And if the amount you are expected to tip continues to rise, as it has consistently in the US for the last 25+ years, then that’s only going to become more certain.

    The reason that tipping based on food price is bogus (to me) is that the food price has nothing to do with the quality of service. Servers end up being tipped on factors totally out of their control: wait time, food temp, taste, chicness of restaurant, etc. Time for a system overhaul!

    I don’t think there’s such a thing as “overthinking” something. Thinking is about the best thing a human could do IMHO.

    #308085
    Snarf
    Snarf
    Participant

    I think Craigslist’s R&R is a good forum for discussing tipping.

    #308086

    Snarf wrote >>
    I think Craigslist’s R&R is a good forum for discussing tipping.

    Isn’t this the sort of worthy local topic that CU is a good platform to discuss? I like that actual Cbus servers and restauranteurs can give their two cents here.

    #308087

    Brant
    Participant

    I worked in restaurants (off and on) for 15 years. My first job at Chi-Chi’s, back in 1994, the standard tip was 10%-15%. Five years later, it was 15%-20%. By the time I left my last serving job at Z Cucina, 20% was considered a minimum tip. I don’t know how this happened, but it did. So there probably is something to your “tipping inflation” theory.

    I also have to say, I think that a good deal of “service inflation” has also occurred over time. Most chain restaurants have drilled into their service staff a level of attention that used to be considered “great” but is now considered “standard.” Because the level of service has been standardized to such a high level, it’s difficult for a server to rise above it. So most customers rate their server not on effort or attention or menu knowledge, but rather on personality. They tip according to whether or not they like the server personally. This is why I advocate a standard 20% service fee in lieu of a tip on ALL checks, not just parties of 6 or more.

    PSA: If you give a bad tip for poor service, 9 times out of 10 the server will not understand why this happened. Chances are s/he will just assume you’re just a cheap bastard with cruel intentions. If you encounter bad service, NEVER STIFF a server. Leave a nominal 10% tip and ask to speak to a manager. Bad tips are a passive-aggressive tactic and it’s a shame that customers have grown to rely on them in place of verbal communication.

    #308088

    Tenzo
    Participant

    And don’t do that thing,

    where you drop a penny in a full glass of water,
    place a coaster or a menu over the top.
    Overturn the water glass real fast and place it on the table
    then slide out the menu or coaster,

    Leaving a penny in the center of the glass of water that can’t be picked up without flooding the whole area.

    That’s just juvenile.

    #308089

    Trixie
    Participant

    The whole “if restaurants just charged more for the food so no one would have to tip” theory is just stupid. First of all, your garbage burger from Max & Erma’s would probably cost 30 bucks to cover the servers wage and benefits. Then service standards would fall through the floor if people were paid a salary to serve. It’s sort of a thankless job and the reason people do it is for the reasons I previously stated. Cash and flexibility.

    #308090

    Tenzo
    Participant

    Trixie wrote >>
    The whole “if restaurants just charged more for the food so no one would have to tip” theory is just stupid. First of all, your garbage burger from Max & Erma’s would probably cost 30 bucks to cover the servers wage and benefits. Then service standards would fall through the floor if people were paid a salary to serve. It’s sort of a thankless job and the reason people do it is for the reasons I previously stated. Cash and flexibility.

    Funny, seems to work in other countries.
    Are you saying that Americans are too lazy? That if given an adaquate wage on the opportunity to slack off, they will.

    I don’t buy it.

    #308091

    StowCbusCleveland
    Participant

    Tenzo wrote >>

    Trixie wrote >>
    The whole “if restaurants just charged more for the food so no one would have to tip” theory is just stupid. First of all, your garbage burger from Max & Erma’s would probably cost 30 bucks to cover the servers wage and benefits. Then service standards would fall through the floor if people were paid a salary to serve. It’s sort of a thankless job and the reason people do it is for the reasons I previously stated. Cash and flexibility.

    Funny, seems to work in other countries.
    Are you saying that Americans are too lazy? That if given an adaquate wage on the opportunity to slack off, they will.
    I don’t buy it.

    What I was gonna say…it works fine in other countries. I’m not convinced that tipped service is better service, it’s just a different cultural expectation of how things should go. As others have pointed out, a lot of the restaurant experience is outside the control of servers anyway, but they bear 100% of the risk/reward.

    Are there any local restaurants that try the “normal wage, no tipping” approach? I’d be interested to check a place like that out just to try the experience without having to dine out in Japan.

    #308092

    Brant Jones wrote >>
    ledge, but rather on personality. They tip according to whether or not they like the server personally. This is why I advocate a standard 20% service fee in lieu of a tip on ALL checks, not just parties of 6 or more.

    Brant, great article. They raise a good point about the “class system” in many restaurants, where cooks/busers earn much less for equally hard work. When I worked @ Scottsdale Buca di Beppo *ugh* years ago, the busers did most of the hustling but we were only expected to pay out a fraction of our tips to them, I think 2%. It was up to servers to give them more than that. But if I gave 50%, other servers got mad b/c I was showing them up.

    I like how Northstar works.

    #308093

    lisathewaitress
    Participant

    Northstar might work for those who work there, but it would be nowhere near a living wage for a professional server (like myself). The last time I saw an ad for them on Craig’s List, I believe the wage was listed at $9/hour.

    I just don’t think you can compare Northstar to a full-service restaurant. If you like that model, then why don’t you just stick to going to those places?

    #308094

    lisathewaitress wrote >>

    I just don’t think you can compare Northstar to a full-service restaurant. If you like that model, then why don’t you just stick to going to those places?

    Because I get bored of eating the same old veggie burger all the time (tasty as it is)! I’m only posting some different ideas online to get feedback and dialogue, but I’m getting the vibe that some CU people are sick of this thread so I’ll take it to another site. Thanks everyone for your feedback!

    #308095

    Tenzo
    Participant

    sugarplumclarey wrote >>

    Brant Jones wrote >>
    ledge, but rather on personality. They tip according to whether or not they like the server personally. This is why I advocate a standard 20% service fee in lieu of a tip on ALL checks, not just parties of 6 or more.

    Brant, great article. They raise a good point about the “class system” in many restaurants, where cooks/busers earn much less for equally hard work.

    Class system?
    Unfair?
    You bet! So?
    How hard you work and pay don’t go together (despite what your boss says).

    Starting wage at a French resturant I worked at was $7.50. And they wanted you to have a two year culinary degree. Most starters have $40K – $60K student loans.

    Meanwile the average tab was over $100 a person.
    Making the tip at a table for 4 $80. More than a cook made all day. Yeah, the wine snob and busboy made a part of that, but none of it trickled into the kitchen.

    #308096

    Trixie
    Participant

    Tenzo wrote >>

    Trixie wrote >>
    The whole “if restaurants just charged more for the food so no one would have to tip” theory is just stupid. First of all, your garbage burger from Max & Erma’s would probably cost 30 bucks to cover the servers wage and benefits. Then service standards would fall through the floor if people were paid a salary to serve. It’s sort of a thankless job and the reason people do it is for the reasons I previously stated. Cash and flexibility.

    Funny, seems to work in other countries.
    Are you saying that Americans are too lazy? That if given an adaquate wage on the opportunity to slack off, they will.
    I don’t buy it.

    Americans are fat and lazy but that’s a whole different thread. Don’t buy it? You are just looking for an excuse to say that servers aren’t worth the money they make.

    Do you know exactly how it works in other countries? Are servers paid 20 bucks an hour with benefits in the countries where tipping is not required? I’ve been to other countries. I can’t quite remember the whole tipping thing in the nine other countries I’ve been to but I do remember that eating out in Paris and London was not cheap. Personally, I’d rather pay 30 bucks for burgers and beers and throw my server 20% than pay $60.00 for the same dinner because the owner of the restaurant has to cover labor costs. And to argue that people in the kitchen makes less so servers are snobs is ridiculous. They choose to work in the kitchen. Servers and bartenders choose to work in the front of the house.

    #308097

    TaraK
    Participant

    Americans are fat and lazy but that’s a whole different thread. Don’t buy it? You are just looking for an excuse to say that servers aren’t worth the money they make.

    I have a really hard time understanding the connection between the first and last sentence.

Viewing 15 posts - 76 through 90 (of 321 total)

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