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Tipping inflation?

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Tipping inflation?

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  • #308023

    nexttuesday
    Participant

    I agree that if if that 5% makes a big difference to you, then you shouldn’t be eating out. Also, if servers make more than you, you probably shouldn’t be eating out very often, or you should go back to serving.

    I’ve been a server, and I often felt entitled to more than 15%. Probably because I often got more than 15%. If people often tip you a certain percentage, you begin to think that’s the type of service you provide and the type of tip you deserve. So when some people give you less, you feel slighted.

    If you want to leave 15% all the time, that’s your right. I don’t think you can justify it by saying they’ve already gotten a raise more than the rest of America however. Just because prices increase on the menu doesn’t mean more money is going into their pockets. Business is down in restaurants, so there are less jobs for servers and less tips overall. It doesn’t matter if everyone leaves you 25% if you only have half the tables.

    #308024

    bustowner
    Participant

    TaraK wrote >>
    Here’s a question — a sincere question, to which I don’t know the answer — why is the amount of the tip based on the cost of the food? I mean, it doesn’t require more energy to serve more expensive food? I don’t understand the logic. I mean, if a couple has a $30 meal at a Mexican place and a $80 meal at a nicer place, and both meals involve the same amount of time, why should one person get a $6 tip and the other $16?

    The reason one person gets the higher tip is that at nicer, more expensive restaurants, support staff are present in higher numbers, and the server has to tip them out. Tipping out bar and bussers 10% of your tips each is pretty standard, then there may be some food runners to tip, as well. So if you gross $100, you walk with $75 . . .

    I find myself in agreement with some of the sentiments expressed in this thread about not going out to eat if you can’t afford, or want to, tip.

    Or just get carryout.

    Which begs the question: when do you tip on carryout?

    #308025

    nexttuesday wrote >>
    I agree that if if that 5% makes a big difference to you, then you shouldn’t be eating out. Also, if servers make more than you, you probably shouldn’t be eating out very often, or you should go back to serving.
    I’ve been a server, and I often felt entitled to more than 15%. Probably because I often got more than 15%. If people often tip you a certain percentage, you begin to think that’s the type of service you provide and the type of tip you deserve. So when some people give you less, you feel slighted.
    If you want to leave 15% all the time, that’s your right. I don’t think you can justify it by saying they’ve already gotten a raise more than the rest of America however. Just because prices increase on the menu doesn’t mean more money is going into their pockets. Business is down in restaurants, so there are less jobs for servers and less tips overall. It doesn’t matter if everyone leaves you 25% if you only have half the tables.

    To clarify: I’m not advocating for 15% tips, nor am I trying to justify low tipping, nor am I complaining that servers earn more than I do, nor do I eat out if/where I can’t afford to, nor do I tip below 20% when I do, nor am I griping about tipping a few extra bucks.

    When I worked as a server, I just assumed that 15% meant “OK, you did the basics” and 20% meant “good job.” Anything above that meant that I did something extra special for the table, or they were really wealthy/generous. My question, though, is how 20% came to mean what 15% used to mean, etc. Is it really a matter of simple math?

    The economics of eating out have shifted since I was younger, and it seems like several industries now rely on their customers to determine and/or subsidize employee wages, such as “tip jars” at coffee shops.

    #308026

    lisathewaitress
    Participant

    I have to say that for all of my serving career, it seems that 18-20% has been the norm, so I’m not sure when or if there was tipping inflation. I’ve heard that in the south and in southern California, 15% is still considered okay.

    #308027

    StowCbusCleveland
    Participant

    I distinctly remember as a kid asking why you leave extra money behind and I was taught on the spot how the system works, including that you always leave 15%.

    I’ve always wondered how we evolved an industry where A) Tipping is expected and B) tipping is so expected, that employees are basically unpaid by their employers, knowing full well they’ll be tipped. Servers are on a similar pay arrangement to strippers…how did we get there?

    #308028

    TaraK
    Participant

    bustowner wrote >>

    TaraK wrote >>
    Here’s a question — a sincere question, to which I don’t know the answer — why is the amount of the tip based on the cost of the food? I mean, it doesn’t require more energy to serve more expensive food? I don’t understand the logic. I mean, if a couple has a $30 meal at a Mexican place and a $80 meal at a nicer place, and both meals involve the same amount of time, why should one person get a $6 tip and the other $16?

    The reason one person gets the higher tip is that at nicer, more expensive restaurants, support staff are present in higher numbers, and the server has to tip them out. Tipping out bar and bussers 10% of your tips each is pretty standard, then there may be some food runners to tip, as well. So if you gross $100, you walk with $75 . . .
    I find myself in agreement with some of the sentiments expressed in this thread about not going out to eat if you can’t afford, or want to, tip.

    If you just don’t want to tip, you suck and, no you shouldn’t go out. I know one person like that, and they can certainly afford it. I kind of don’t like the idea that you should only eat at places where you can afford a 20% tip (as opposed to a smaller one). It kinds of feels like “eat within your class” to me. I mean, people have hard times when they may still want to take a partner out to celebrate a birthday. The bill alone may be a stretch for them to afford. While they should tip decently, I know that the few dollar difference can actually mean something for people who are scraping by but trying to celebrate. (No tipping, however, is never okay. Ever.) At the same time, I do think the tip should be factored into the cost of the meal, just like drinks. So maybe I don’t know what I think.

    Or just get carryout.
    Which begs the question: when do you tip on carryout?

    There’s a whole thread on that one.

    #308029
    SJT
    SJT
    Participant

    lisathewaitress wrote >>
    I have to say that for all of my serving career, it seems that 18-20% has been the norm, so I’m not sure when or if there was tipping inflation. ”

    I was thinking the same thing. I also agree that if this is something that concerns someone that much- then one probably shouldn’t be eating out that day. But I am also someone who tips a pizza guy 5 bucks usually. It only seems right though. I mean he/she is bringing ready to eat PIZZA to my door ;-) It seems like the least I can do. We tip to show thanks to those who make it possible for us not to have to cook, clean up or hell- even move sometimes during our feeding time. LOL

    #308030

    lisathewaitress
    Participant

    SJT wrote >>

    lisathewaitress wrote >>
    I have to say that for all of my serving career, it seems that 18-20% has been the norm, so I’m not sure when or if there was tipping inflation. ”

    I was thinking the same thing. I also agree that if this is something that concerns someone that much- then one probably shouldn’t be eating out that day. But I am also someone who tips a pizza guy 5 bucks usually. It only seems right though. I mean he/she is bringing ready to eat PIZZA to my door ;-) It seems like the least I can do. We tip to show thanks to those who make it possible for us not to have to cook, clean up or hell- even move sometimes during our feeding time. LOL

    totally agree on the pizza thing – we always overtip the pizza guy. i mean, clearly i’m too lazy to provide food for myself, and they just bring it right to you.

    #308031
    SJT
    SJT
    Participant

    @Lisa- I almost feel ashamed at times that I ordered pizza. It’s like it is the LAST resort I should use as a meal or something (which is totally ridiculous I know). It reminds me of a bit some comedian does where he is talking about how lazy we have become that when the pizza guy shows up& rings the doorbell we actually think to ourselves, “I have to go get the door now!!?? What a pain in the ass!” He made me cry I was laughing so hard bc I KNOW that I have had those thoughts bc I am sick or hungover or just being a bum. I am not proud to admit that either.

    #308032

    thefiercelime
    Participant

    I’ve always been in the habit of tipping 30-40% at restaurants. I figure it all comes back to you. If I want to save money I can go to the grocery store and make it myself. As far as bars go, I was probably comped more alcohol than a lot of people drink in a lifetime. I kind of lived on a barstool, though, so, the sheer volume may have had something to do with the discounts. So, there’s my advertisement and tip of the day: The more you drink the more you save. What?

    #308033

    JonMyers
    Participant

    The tipping inflation that is absurd to me is at the coffee shop. A buck tip on top of a $1.75 black coffee can be extreme. Sometimes I do tip that, but not always.

    #308034

    TaraK
    Participant

    lisathewaitress wrote >>

    SJT wrote >>

    lisathewaitress wrote >>
    I have to say that for all of my serving career, it seems that 18-20% has been the norm, so I’m not sure when or if there was tipping inflation. ”

    I was thinking the same thing. I also agree that if this is something that concerns someone that much- then one probably shouldn’t be eating out that day. But I am also someone who tips a pizza guy 5 bucks usually. It only seems right though. I mean he/she is bringing ready to eat PIZZA to my door ;-) It seems like the least I can do. We tip to show thanks to those who make it possible for us not to have to cook, clean up or hell- even move sometimes during our feeding time. LOL

    totally agree on the pizza thing – we always overtip the pizza guy. i mean, clearly i’m too lazy to provide food for myself, and they just bring it right to you.

    I’m inclined to overtip any delivery person or person working in a restaurant where I know they’re making less than at other places. Or even the taco/food trucks.

    On another subject, I feel like when you order less at a restaurant you sometime get poorer service, and maybe that’s b/c they assume you’re going to leave a smaller tip, which isn’t always true. (Sometimes you just don’t want much food.) And then they do get a smaller tip because they never come check on drinks for the rest of the meal. It frustrates me.

    I also know that some restaurants where I used to live told servers to cater to the families and not prioritize couples b/c they tipped better (my friends worked at them). This always pissed me off. It was a small town so the number of good restaurants were limited, but tables of two would often not even get the bread that was brought out to everyone. It was ridiculous. Naturally, it became a self-fulfilling prophecy for many. We still tried to tip well in hopes that we’d prove their theory wrong, but it didn’t seem to work. Is that logic applied elsewhere?

    #308035

    thefiercelime
    Participant

    JonMyers wrote >>
    The tipping inflation that is absurd to me is at the coffee shop. A buck tip on top of a $1.75 black coffee can be extreme. Sometimes I do tip that, but not always.

    I definitely vary on that. My order is almost always 2 large ice coffees to go. It doesn’t seem much different to me than McDonald’s serving a coffee at the drive thru window. I’d be happy to pour it myself, if they let me.

    #308036

    joev
    Participant

    TaraK wrote >>
    I kind of don’t like the idea that you should only eat at places where you can afford a 20% tip (as opposed to a smaller one). It kinds of feels like “eat within your class” to me. I mean, people have hard times when they may still want to take a partner out to celebrate a birthday. The bill alone may be a stretch for them to afford. While they should tip decently, I know that the few dollar difference can actually mean something for people who are scraping by but trying to celebrate. (No tipping, however, is never okay. Ever.)

    That’s not eating outside of your class, it’s eating outside of your means. If you want to go to fancier restaurant, you just have to save up more. The service staff shouldn’t be stiffed just because a customer isn’t as wealthy as other customers.

    #308037

    Hael
    Member

    JonMyers wrote >>
    The tipping inflation that is absurd to me is at the coffee shop. A buck tip on top of a $1.75 black coffee can be extreme. Sometimes I do tip that, but not always.

    Same with bars.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 321 total)

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