Our City Online

Messageboard - General Columbus Discussion

NOTE: You are viewing an archived version of the Columbus Underground forums/messageboard. As of 05/22/16 they have been closed to new comments and replies, but will remain accessible for archived searches and reference. For more information CLICK HERE

The Value of Urban Street Trees

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion The Value of Urban Street Trees

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 81 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #516279
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    alexs said:
    Much of the permeable pavement is really simple, like paving bricks designed to leave gaps. But you have to have somewhere for the water to go to – “infiltrate” is the term used – so often there’s a big gravel-filled basin under the pavement to catch the water and let it soak into the ground. And there’s some kind of provision for overflow.

    Doesn’t sound that hard. I wonder what the maintenance is, if you have to mow it or whatnot. I guess it would be hard to plow– but don’t thy plow cobblestone streets? What’s the mechanics on that?

    #516280

    heresthecasey
    Participant

    I would love for the city to re-introduce street trees to High St through campus. Some shade along there is desperately needed, and the sawed-off stumps and empty grates are a real eyesore.

    There is always the worry that students would trash them again, but the ones planted in Old North Columbus, from Lane up to Hudson, more recently seem to be doing alright.

    I think it’s certainly worth the chance.

    #516281

    tourist19
    Participant

    melikecheese said:
    Reading this just made me really said because all the 98% of the trees on E Gates St are Ash tress and they are all severely infected with the Ash Bore Beetle…they removed 2, and I believe will soon come and remove all of them, and it’s going to be terrible. No shade, totally open, I only hope they plant more trees, so far they cut 2 big ones last summer and just left the stumps sticking out, a really poor job.

    I’m on Stewart and I got a blue X on my ash tree just recently. I also got a door hanger that stated my tree would be replaced. There was a number to call, so I did because I wanted to know with what they would replace it. The nice lady I spoke with said they did not know yet, but to call back once the stump was removed and they would see what was in stock in the nursery.

    Linden trees are what I am pulling for on our street. They smell DIVINE when they bloom.

    #516282

    Patch
    Participant

    joev said:
    I also HATE Bradford pears. For God’s sake, plant a REAL pear tree with pears you can eat!

    I swear!

    Wouldn’t this be an awesome idea?!?

    #516283
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    People sometimes don’t like fruit-bearing trees (at least really luscious, sweet fruits like yummy edible pears) in the city because they attract undesirable animal friends. You would almost have to net the trees to keep the riff raff out.

    Which is kinda sad.

    Whereas Bradford pear blossoms smell like dirty underwear and keep everyone out except, I presume, some pollinators that must like that sort of thing.

    I also think real edible fruit-bearing trees would require a lot of upkeep to remain in good condition and productive. But if it’s in your yard, it could be a really sweet hobby.

    #516284

    tourist19
    Participant

    Manatee said:
    People sometimes don’t like fruit-bearing trees (at least really luscious, sweet fruits like yummy edible pears) in the city because they attract undesirable animal friends. You would almost have to net the trees to keep the riff raff out.

    Which is kinda sad.

    Whereas Bradford pear blossoms smell like dirty underwear and keep everyone out except, I presume, some pollinators that must like that sort of thing.

    I also think real edible fruit-bearing trees would require a lot of upkeep to remain in good condition and productive. But if it’s in your yard, it could be a really sweet hobby.

    I have a real live pear tree that makes luscious juicy pears and yes it is a great deal of work. I find it to be worth it, but the clean up and maintenance of that tree would be a turn off for a lot of people. It also does attract a number of undesirables, such as squirrels (Nature’s Assholes) and one fall a big fat groundhog who moved in under my garage.
    Bradford Pears do give a bad name to pears though. They suck.

    #516285
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    Hahahhaa, “Nature’s Assholes” :)

    #516286

    News
    Participant

    That Tree on the Corner May Be Worth More Than Your House
    Pittsburgh | 02/18/2013 4:52pm | 0
    NATE SELTENRICH | NEXT CITY

    In 2005, Pittsburgh had 31,000 trees on 900 miles of streets. Which may seem like a decent amount, until you realize the ideal number of street trees for a city that size is 60,000. This was a problem — one of many faced by the cash-strapped city — and so Pittsburgh decided to consider its trees like it would any other asset: By measuring their benefits in terms of cold, hard cash.

    READ MORE: http://nextcity.org/daily/entry/that-tree-on-the-corner-may-be-worth-more-than-your-house

    #516287

    News
    Participant

    U.S. Urban Trees Store Carbon, Provide Billions in Economic Value, Finds State-By-State Analysis

    May 7, 2013 — From New York City’s Central Park to Golden Gate Park in San Francisco, America’s urban forests store an estimated 708 million tons of carbon, an environmental service with an estimated value of $50 billion, according to a recent U.S. Forest Service study.

    READ MORE: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/05/130507195815.htm?utm_source=feedly

    #516288

    News
    Participant

    Green Cities: Urban Trees Save Lives
    Posted August 8, 2013

    A recent study by urban forestry guru David Nowak and other researchers at U.S. Forest Service and The Davey Institute found that urban trees save at least one life per year in most cities and up to 8 people per year in large metropolises like New York City.

    READ MORE: http://mc-2034-1570875056.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com/dirt/169011/urban-trees-save-lives

    #1085542

    News
    Participant

    Living on tree-lined streets makes you young, thin and rich
    July 14, 2015

    We have known for a long time that people are happier around trees; only yesterday Megan wrote that “just being in nature helps to calm us, helps us to focus and is just plain essential to happiness. Now a new study demonstrates that trees do a whole lot more than just make us feel good. A team from the University of Chicago and various Toronto organizations claims that:

    READ MORE: http://www.treehugger.com/economics/living-tree-lined-streets-makes-you-young-thin-and-rich.html

    #1085550

    WJT
    Participant

    Zelkova Serrata ‘Green Vase’ is supposed to be a good urban large street/yard tree and is hardy here. Are any being planted anywhere in Cbus? It also sort of resembles the old Elms which used to grace our streets before Dutch Elm Disease.

    I have had ‘Kieffer’ Pears at my homes for the last 25 years, and have not had any problems with them, and have one next to my street now. No disease, but the fruit is huge and hard, best used cooked. Resistant to many insects because they are so hard(and stay that way unless you leave them to rot). Biggest problem I ever had was neighborhood heathen children grabbing them and using them as weapons in street wars. (get off my lawn!).

    #1085554

    Nancy H
    Participant

    I moved into a new (to me) house a few months back. When I looked up what kind of permit/approval I would need to have a tree removed, I was shocked to discover Columbus has no regulations on cutting down trees on private property. Not that I want more “government red tape” but trees in the urban environment are an asset.

    #1085555

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    I moved into a new (to me) house a few months back. When I looked up what kind of permit/approval I would need to have a tree removed, I was shocked to discover Columbus has no regulations on cutting down trees on private property. Not that I want more “government red tape” but trees in the urban environment are an asset.

    That doesn’t sound right, can you link to it? Columbus is trying to increase tree canopy cover.

    #1085556

    Nancy H
    Participant

    @Alex – No link because I couldn’t find anything. Lots of info about appropriate street trees to plant, having a dead one remove, and other info about the ones in the tree lawn/public right of way.

    When I talked to several local tree service companies to get bids on the job, they said the same thing – no permit needed.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 81 total)

The forum ‘General Columbus Discussion’ is closed to new topics and replies.

The Columbus Coffee Festival Returns with a “Curated Take Home Box Experience”

CLICK HERE TO PLACE YOUR ORDER