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The Value of Urban Street Trees

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion The Value of Urban Street Trees

  • This topic has 80 replies, 22 voices, and was last updated 4 years ago by Ned23Ned23.
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 81 total)
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  • #94160

    News
    Participant

    Urban Trees: Let’s Grow Old Together

    Dublin, Ohio | 10/10/2012 7:00am | 0

    LEDA MARRITZ | NEXT AMERICAN CITY

    When we talk about street trees and the urban forest, sometimes we miss an essential truth: Not all street trees are created equal. Mature trees are an order of magnitude more valuable to us than young, small ones.

    There is no shortage of scientific evidence supporting the incredible benefits that mature trees provide to urban neighborhoods. Yet many local policies seem to focus only on the quantity of trees being planted rather than the quality. Let’s look at some of the ways mature urban trees provide incredible benefits to their communities.

    READ MORE: http://americancity.org/daily/entry/urban-trees-lets-grow-old-together

    #516265

    Pablo
    Participant

    Good article!

    #516266

    News
    Participant

    Urban Forestry: How U.S. Cities Are Gradually Greening

    Everybody loves a free giveaway. And increasingly, this affinity for freebies is being used in cities, to promote environmental citizenship.

    READ MORE: http://www.good.is/posts/cities-are-giving-trees-away-to-be-more-green/

    #516267

    News
    Participant

    Saving the Urban Canopy
    Denver, Toronto | 01/25/2013 10:25am
    LEDA MARRITZ | NEXT CITY

    Adequate amounts of lightly compacted, good-quality soil are essential to healthy tree growth. Nowhere are these conditions more challenging than in urban areas dominated by streets, sidewalks, buildings and parking lots. These surfaces are essential for urban living but require heavy soil compaction, which limits the development of large, healthy root systems.

    READ MORE: http://nextcity.org/daily/entry/saving-the-urban-canopy

    #516268

    melikecheese
    Participant

    Reading this just made me really said because all the 98% of the trees on E Gates St are Ash tress and they are all severely infected with the Ash Bore Beetle…they removed 2, and I believe will soon come and remove all of them, and it’s going to be terrible. No shade, totally open, I only hope they plant more trees, so far they cut 2 big ones last summer and just left the stumps sticking out, a really poor job.

    #516269
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Yeah, there’s a lot of trees with X marks near us around Mayme Moore Park and it will be sad to see them go. Though they’re not looking very healthy right now anyway… you can see some in this photo from last summer:

    #516270
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    Look at the big trees that are doing well. Those are good to plant.

    The Plane trees along Neil are a great example of trees that like urban conditions and age gracefully. They also give Neil great character and probably save residents in that area money over time by adding shade and soaking up excess groundwater.

    There’s a giant hackberry growing at the corner of Delaware and 1st, that’s a good urban species as well and the fruits are enjoyed by wildlife. You can eat the fruits too, but they are mostly seed surrounded by a mincemeaty-tasting raisiny flesh.

    The ginkgos like it in Columbus (I think I already brought up the nasty-smelling female ginkgo near the corner of Goodale Park at Goodale and Park Streets).

    Tulip trees have pretty tulip or cat-face-shaped leaves and beautiful exotic-looking flowers, and they grow very fast and straight.

    Oaks are so nice but they seem to grow so slowly. Maples are okay too but it seems I never see really nice big ones.

    Big trees are pretty valuable, for more than board feet.

    Some news about the ash tree situation: http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2013/01/when-trees-die-people-die/267322/#.UQFGaIrf1tQ.email

    #516271
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    Here’s a useful article on what trees might not be so good in an urban situation, although I have to disagree with their assessment of mulberry trees because I just love them :)

    http://www.houselogic.com/photos/plants-trees/bad-trees/slide/1-silver-maple-acer-saccharinum/#1-silver-maple-acer-saccharinum

    #516272

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    I’ve mentioned this before, it’s tough in many ways to establish street trees. Some factors are:

    – limited selection of trees suited to the harsh environment
    – utilities, both above and below
    – access issues like obstructing sidewalks and rights of way
    – permission and cooperation from landowners and tenants
    – vandalism and other damage
    – someone has to be responsible for their care, like pruning, and raking leaves
    – occasional issues like established tree roots heaving sidewalks
    – occasional issues like dropped limbs or whole fallen trees

    Other than all that, street trees are great. Someone on this board posted before-and-after pics of the Short North, utterly barren about 20 years ago, but shaded now. OTOH they tried planting along High Street past campus, and they even armored the trees in ornamental iron cages, and they were still snapped off at shoulder height.

    #516273
    lazyfish
    lazyfish
    Participant

    I think the High St. honey locust are slated to be removed in the next couple of years, they were planted in 87 and nearing the end of their life as prisoners of the urban streets.

    #516274

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    When I talked to the city forester last summer, he said they had thousands of ash trees to remove because of the borer.

    Besides streets, consider shaded parking lots. In hot weather, people will do silly things to try to get any shade they can in a parking lot.

    Look at that unfortunate tree, though, sitting in a raised island in an asphalt sea. In a cruel twist, that pavement produces a lot of runoff while starving the tree. How difficult would it be to turn this design inside-out, and have the tree in a sunken box that gets the runoff? You can see this starting to show up, for example on the west side of Kingsdale.

    #516275
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    Not to mention it’d be so great to have permeable parking lots everywhere.

    I know it’s kind of a pipe dream but I’ve always thought this sort of thing looks beautiful:

    #516276
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    Oh and I was also happy that they pooh-poohed the Bradford Pear in that article, because I think Bradford Pears smell like poopoo and they’re all over Columbus :)

    #516277

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    Much of the permeable pavement is really simple, like paving bricks designed to leave gaps. But you have to have somewhere for the water to go to – “infiltrate” is the term used – so often there’s a big gravel-filled basin under the pavement to catch the water and let it soak into the ground. And there’s some kind of provision for overflow.

    #516278

    joev
    Participant

    Manatee said:
    Oh and I was also happy that they pooh-poohed the Bradford Pear in that article, because I think Bradford Pears smell like poopoo and they’re all over Columbus :)

    I also HATE Bradford pears. For God’s sake, plant a REAL pear tree with pears you can eat!

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 81 total)

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