Our City Online

Messageboard - Development

NOTE: You are viewing an archived version of the Columbus Underground forums/messageboard. As of 05/22/16 they have been closed to new comments and replies, but will remain accessible for archived searches and reference. For more information CLICK HERE

The Streets are Too Damn Wide

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Development The Streets are Too Damn Wide

  • This topic is empty.
Viewing 15 posts - 106 through 120 (of 128 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #448193

    HeySquare
    Participant

    Hey… thanks you guys. That’s very nice of you to say.

    I’m going to bookmark this thread to read on days when I feel like I’m shouting into the abyss :)

    But Caleb… to your point… I think the real actions that we all can take to see some of these ideas come to fruition are exactly the things that Walker encourages people to do everyday. Show up. Bring ideas. Talk to lawmakers and politicians at any opportunity. Write letters. Advocate. Join an advocacy group. Volunteer. Do it through boring meetings, and nights when you’d really prefer to be anywhere but in a stuffy conference room listening to sweaty guys in ties rambling on about average daily traffic and pavement conditions.

    Then wait.

    And do it some more. Stay focused even if nothing seems to be happening. Go to more meetings. And perhaps you will see some progress. No guarantees though :)

    showing up is the first step.

    #448194
    Caleb
    Caleb
    Participant

    HeySquare wrote >>
    Hey… thanks you guys. That’s very nice of you to say.
    I’m going to bookmark this thread to read on days when I feel like I’m shouting into the abyss :)
    But Caleb… to your point… I think the real actions that we all can take to see some of these ideas come to fruition are exactly the things that Walker encourages people to do everyday. Show up. Bring ideas. Talk to lawmakers and politicians at any opportunity. Write letters. Advocate. Join an advocacy group. Volunteer. Do it through boring meetings, and nights when you’d really prefer to be anywhere but in a stuffy conference room listening to sweaty guys in ties rambling on about average daily traffic and pavement conditions.
    Then wait.
    And do it some more. Stay focused even if nothing seems to be happening. Go to more meetings. And perhaps you will see some progress. No guarantees though :)
    showing up is the first step.

    I think we found our next mayor! HEYSQUARE FOR MAYOR!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    #448195

    people211
    Member

    What if they kept Broad street the way it is, and put a big round-about (Dupont Cirle-esque, but not nearly as big of course) right in the middle of Broad/ High? With a grand fountain in the middle.. That lights up at night!..

    My apologies if any else has already presented that idea…

    #448196

    johnwirtz
    Participant

    people211 wrote >>
    What if they kept Broad street the way it is, and put a big round-about (Dupont Cirle-esque, but not nearly as big of course) right in the middle of Broad/ High? With a grand fountain in the middle.. That lights up at night!..
    My apologies if any else has already presented that idea…

    Assuming you’re envisioning a two-lane roundabout (or more), I don’t think it would fit in the existing ROW, at least not on the NW and NE corners of the intersection.

    #448197

    Alex Silbajoris
    Participant

    HeySquare wrote >>
    Hey… thanks you guys. That’s very nice of you to say.
    I’m going to bookmark this thread to read on days when I feel like I’m shouting into the abyss :)
    But Caleb… to your point… I think the real actions that we all can take to see some of these ideas come to fruition are exactly the things that Walker encourages people to do everyday. Show up. Bring ideas. Talk to lawmakers and politicians at any opportunity. Write letters. Advocate. Join an advocacy group. Volunteer. Do it through boring meetings, and nights when you’d really prefer to be anywhere but in a stuffy conference room listening to sweaty guys in ties rambling on about average daily traffic and pavement conditions.
    Then wait.
    And do it some more. Stay focused even if nothing seems to be happening. Go to more meetings. And perhaps you will see some progress. No guarantees though :)
    showing up is the first step.

    Nicely said! I was reading through that like check, check, check…

    I like to say that most people sit back and watch Columbus history unfolding like watching a movie. But you can reach into the picture and manipulate things.

    Right now I’m attempting to realize a separate pedestrian/jogger path along Griggs, some kind of pea gravel like the loop trail around Antrim, designed to discourage any kind of wheeled traffic. Picture that running between the road and the riverbank.

    #448198
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    johnwirtz wrote >>

    people211 wrote >>
    What if they kept Broad street the way it is, and put a big round-about (Dupont Cirle-esque, but not nearly as big of course) right in the middle of Broad/ High? With a grand fountain in the middle.. That lights up at night!..
    My apologies if any else has already presented that idea…

    Assuming you’re envisioning a two-lane roundabout (or more), I don’t think it would fit in the existing ROW, at least not on the NW and NE corners of the intersection.

    If center lanes were converted into medians on both Broad & High and left turns were restricted (which they pretty much are most all day now anyway) there might be room in the middle of the intersection for a squared-off median with a fountain or statue or something without creating a roundabout.

    I wonder how often it would get crashed into. ;)

    #448199

    johnwirtz
    Participant

    Walker wrote >>

    johnwirtz wrote >>

    people211 wrote >>
    What if they kept Broad street the way it is, and put a big round-about (Dupont Cirle-esque, but not nearly as big of course) right in the middle of Broad/ High? With a grand fountain in the middle.. That lights up at night!..
    My apologies if any else has already presented that idea…

    Assuming you’re envisioning a two-lane roundabout (or more), I don’t think it would fit in the existing ROW, at least not on the NW and NE corners of the intersection.

    If center lanes were converted into medians on both Broad & High and left turns were restricted (which they pretty much are most all day now anyway) there might be room in the middle of the intersection for a squared-off median with a fountain or statue or something without creating a roundabout.

    Not a bad idea. Of course if you put a median on Broad, you might have an easier time accommodating left turns (although there are still issues). Would you rather have a fountain/statue or left turns from Broad to High?

    #448200

    ZHC
    Member

    Walker wrote
    If center lanes were converted into medians on both Broad & High and left turns were restricted (which they pretty much are most all day now anyway) there might be room in the middle of the intersection for a squared-off median with a fountain or statue or something without creating a roundabout.
    I wonder how often it would get crashed into. ;)

    Oh I bet a ton. There was/is a statue of General William Palmer in Colorado Springs in the manner you describe and people plowed into on left turns nearly daily it seemed when I lived there.
    http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/19472627/detail.html

    Google Maps Link (check street view)

    but they didn’t have the sense to ban Left Turns like you are proposing, so perhaps it wouldn’t be nearly as bad. :)

    #448201

    Jefe
    Participant

    From StreetsBlog: In the Rust Belt, Protecting Pedestrians is a Two-Way Street [/url]

    In these cities and others across America, one-way streets were a 60s-era innovation designed to increase car capacity in downtowns — meant to funnel drivers as quickly as possible onto exit ramps and off to the suburbs. But as mid-sized cities across the Midwest see an increase in downtown living, there has been heightened awareness about the drawbacks of this arrangement for pedestrians.

    “You essentially have a drag strip,” Milwaukee Alderman Robert Bauman said of one of the city’s four-lane, one-way arterials. “They are a constant source of complaints — from residents across the street and visitors who choose to walk rather than drive.”

    The Alderman has been a leading advocate for a series of four conversions of one-way streets to two-way streets. His motivation? A more livable, less car-centric city.

    Two-way streets “keep traffic speeds down,” he said. “They’re more conducive to pedestrian activity. They’re more conducive to retail activities. In every aspect except traffic capacity, they’re more conducive to urban areas.”

    #448202

    johnwirtz
    Participant

    ^One-way streets are actually safer than two-way streets for pedestrians because there are fewer turning conflicts. However, if they have too many lanes, speed will be an issue. Converting to two-way is one way to reduce the number of lanes and speeds, but you could just as easily reduce the number of lanes on the one-way street.

    #448203

    brothermarcus
    Participant

    Trainer from Brooklyn’s first comment about his first visit to Columbus yesterday “how wide are the streets here? It took me two minutes to walk across one” – immediately reminded me of this thread.

    #448204

    johnwirtz
    Participant

    Did you remind him that our streets have to be wide enough for a team of oxen pulling a wagon to make a U-turn?

    #448205

    Jefe
    Participant

    johnwirtz: I’d agree about one-way streets being safer if we weren’t talking about three- and four-lane wide one-way streets.

    #448206

    Jefe
    Participant

    Here’s another idea: Is the British roundabout conquering the US?

    a study by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety which suggests there is on average a 40% decrease in all accidents and a 90% drop in fatal ones when a traffic intersection is replaced by a roundabout.

    The long-term financial saving is about £150,000, he says, due to reduced maintenance costs, and there are also fuel savings.

    “Not just the cars that aren’t idling at traffic lights, but starting from a dead stop takes up more fuel also, so we are saving thousands of gallons of fuel per roundabout per year,” says the Republican mayor.

    “And aesthetically, we think they’re much nicer. If one is looking out their living room window, would you prefer to see a blinking traffic light all night or a beautifully landscaped roundabout with a fountain and flowers?”

    #448207

    johnwirtz
    Participant

    Jefe wrote >>
    johnwirtz: I’d agree about one-way streets being safer if we weren’t talking about three- and four-lane wide one-way streets.

    Agree. That’s pretty much what I said.

Viewing 15 posts - 106 through 120 (of 128 total)

The forum ‘Development’ is closed to new topics and replies.

Subscribe to the Columbus Underground YouTube channel for exclusive interviews and news updates!

CLICK HERE TO SUBSCRIBE