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High Speed Rail Development in the US

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Transportation High Speed Rail Development in the US

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 946 total)
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  • #341169

    mstimple
    Member

    Yea that’s the one I linked to last night, but there is another site somewhere that listed more stops and went into more detail and also talked about station locations here in Columbus. Your going to get a lot of people from small towns between the cities even more pissed off if they find that this train that they will be paying to build won’t be stopping anywhere near them. However, if you only have one stop between here and Cleveland, the total travel time will be lower.

    #341170

    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Press Release:

    [b]Labor Secretary Solis to Join Governor Strickland for Passenger Rail Announcement Today[/b]

    [i]Columbus, Ohio – U.S. Department of Labor Secretary Hilda Solis today will join Ohio Governor Ted Strickland, state and local officials, and passenger rail supporters to announce that Ohio will receive $400 million in federal rail money for Ohio’s 3C passenger rail service.[/i]

    [i]The event will be held at 1 p.m. today in the Statehouse Atrium.[/i]

    #341171

    Tenzo
    Participant

    Lakee911 wrote >>
    Boo about Chicago getting bucu bucks though.

    Look at the map (thanks Walker) locate the hub.

    #341172

    scornflakes
    Member

    Tenzo wrote >>
    Which ones are high speed?
    Tampa Orlando is a boondoggle. There just isn’t that much traffic between the two spots and it isn’t that far. I’m seeing it as an extension of Disney World Monorail service to the Tampa beaches.

    I don’t see that as a “boondoggle” necessarily. It is almost 100 miles from Orlando to Lakeland to Tampa-St. Pete, and those cities make our urban sprawl problems seem quaint by comparison. Traffic in and around Orlando and Tampa is absolutely [i]insane[/i], and they spend unbelievable amounts of money on road repair every year. The last time I was in Orlando, I was stunned to hear actual Orlandoans saying that they would gladly give up their using their cars so much for a commuter rail and connector lines between Orlando-Tampa-Miami. If this leads to easier, cheaper, less damaging transportation for millions of denizens and tourists in central and south Florida (like I hope it leads to here in Ohio), then every last dime is money well-spent. It would free up hundreds of millions of dollars in federal money that goes there yearly to repair infrastructure, and that helps all of us. (And I would imagine that a lot of the extra cost is justified, due to the unique problems of terrain and environmental impact: sandy soil, wetlands, wildlife, etc.)

    Tenzo wrote >>
    hmmm.
    I just added up the ones that benefit Chicago.
    $2.154B
    I guess that is not surprising consider who he is beholding to.

    Or because Chicago is, you know, kind of a huge city in the center of the country. Look, I know there’s a pretty big media industry in this country that thrives on cynical speculation, reflexively declaring that almost every government project is a “boondoggle” of 2% favoritism, 1% nepotism, and 97% graft; but, man, that AM radio impulse is a poison that you have got to purge. There’s a big difference between being aware, being skeptical, and being cynical.

    #341173

    michaelcoyote
    Participant

    Tenzo wrote >>

    Lakee911 wrote >>
    Boo about Chicago getting bucu bucks though.

    Look at the map (thanks Walker) locate the hub.

    Yeah, considering Chicagoland is one of the biggest users of rail outside the Coasts, it makes sense to beef up their rail infrastructure.

    #341174

    Wickham
    Member

    About the stops. One thing that people are forgetting is something very common in England. They have many stops along a route but not EVERY train has to stop at them all. For instance from London to Cambridge every hour they had a bullet train that made no stops in between the two cities. While every 30 minutes they had a train that made 4 stops in between and so on. More stops allows more access and are good to attract riders, but don’t necessarily mean the travel times over greater distances has to be longer.

    #341175

    johnwirtz
    Participant

    Tenzo wrote >>
    hmmm.
    I just added up the ones that benefit Chicago.
    $2.154B
    I guess that is not surprising consider who he is beholding to.

    We (Chicago) also have stimulus money coming in for local freight projects.

    #341176

    johnwirtz
    Participant

    Wickham wrote >>
    About the stops one thing that people are forgetting is something very common in England. They have many stops along a route but not EVERY train has to stop at them all. For instance from London to Cambridge every hour they had a bullet train that made no stops in between the two cities. While every 30 minutes they had a train that made 4 stops in between and so on. More stops allows more access and are good to attract riders, but don’t necessarily mean the travel times over greater distances has to be longer.

    +1 This should be the model for Ohio. I would love to see some regional commuter rail lines stopping every couple of miles share the same tracks if possible.

    #341177

    Rastapasta
    Member

    Tenzo wrote >>
    hmmm.
    I just added up the ones that benefit Chicago.
    $2.154B
    I guess that is not surprising consider who he is beholding to.

    In all fairness, Chicago seems to be a large rail hub (at least for passenger trains). Of course, Obama, Lahood and Rahm Emanuel are all “great” swindling Illinois politicians…

    As someone who uses Amtrak in Illinois (I ride the Sandburg or sometimes the cross country trains- i.e. SW Chief), the delays, problems, etc. are much too frequent– most of my trips are 2 hours — and 3 out of 5 times (my estimate), it takes double ! In the last two years I have had some horror stories on those trains!

    Existing rail lines need major improvement in addition to adding new lines. It’s a wonderful thing people are finally waking up to rail travel— even with the problems I encounter, I am in love with rail travel.

    #341178

    Mercurius
    Participant

    Does the Controlling Board have the ability to issue the remaining $200 million needed or does this now need to go back through the G.A.? I wish we were granted our full request. Excited, but this isn’t a done deal yet I’m afraid.

    #341179

    michaelcoyote
    Participant

    johnwirtz wrote >>

    Wickham wrote >>
    About the stops one thing that people are forgetting is something very common in England. They have many stops along a route but not EVERY train has to stop at them all. For instance from London to Cambridge every hour they had a bullet train that made no stops in between the two cities. While every 30 minutes they had a train that made 4 stops in between and so on. More stops allows more access and are good to attract riders, but don’t necessarily mean the travel times over greater distances has to be longer.

    +1 This should be the model for Ohio. I would love to see some regional commuter rail lines stopping every couple of miles share the same tracks if possible.

    I find myself alternating between NJ transit and Amtrak when I stay in South Jersey and want to get to the city. It kinda depends on where I’m staying, but often, the NJ transit is easier, and isn’t really that much more time to get into the city.

    That said, when I’m just trying to get to NYC from Philly, it’s really nice when I can get the Acela, or even just a regional train.

    #341180

    Columbusite
    Member

    mstimple wrote >>
    Yea that’s the one I linked to last night, but there is another site somewhere that listed more stops and went into more detail and also talked about station locations here in Columbus. Your going to get a lot of people from small towns between the cities even more pissed off if they find that this train that they will be paying to build won’t be stopping anywhere near them. However, if you only have one stop between here and Cleveland, the total travel time will be lower.

    Whether we like it or not, residents from those depressed small towns can kick and scream all they want. No one, not other residents of Ohio nor the government is going to pay attention to them. It’s the same deal with low-income urban neighborhoods. On the upside though,

    johnwirtz wrote >>

    Wickham wrote >>
    About the stops one thing that people are forgetting is something very common in England. They have many stops along a route but not EVERY train has to stop at them all. For instance from London to Cambridge every hour they had a bullet train that made no stops in between the two cities. While every 30 minutes they had a train that made 4 stops in between and so on. More stops allows more access and are good to attract riders, but don’t necessarily mean the travel times over greater distances has to be longer.

    +1 This should be the model for Ohio. I would love to see some regional commuter rail lines stopping every couple of miles share the same tracks if possible.

    #341181

    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Big map of the various networks and corridors:

    http://usdotblog.typepad.com/.a/6a00e551eea4f588340128771ffb23970c-pi

    #341182

    dru
    Participant

    scornflakes wrote >>

    Tenzo wrote >>
    Which ones are high speed?
    Tampa Orlando is a boondoggle. There just isn’t that much traffic between the two spots and it isn’t that far. I’m seeing it as an extension of Disney World Monorail service to the Tampa beaches.

    I don’t see that as a “boondoggle” necessarily. It is almost 100 miles from Orlando to Lakeland to Tampa-St. Pete, and those cities make our urban sprawl problems seem quaint by comparison. Traffic in and around Orlando and Tampa is absolutely [i]insane[/i], and they spend unbelievable amounts of money on road repair every year. The last time I was in Orlando, I was stunned to hear actual Orlandoans saying that they would gladly give up their using their cars so much for a commuter rail and connector lines between Orlando-Tampa-Miami. If this leads to easier, cheaper, less damaging transportation for millions of denizens and tourists in central and south Florida (like I hope it leads to here in Ohio), then every last dime is money well-spent. It would free up hundreds of millions of dollars in federal money that goes there yearly to repair infrastructure, and that helps all of us. (And I would imagine that a lot of the extra cost is justified, due to the unique problems of terrain and environmental impact: sandy soil, wetlands, wildlife, etc.)

    having just this week driven between Tampa/St Pete and Orlando for business, I can see 3 points to this line.
    1. It has less to do with getting Mouseketters from Orlando to the beach, and a lot about docking cruise ships in the bay and shuttling them the opposite way to Orlando. The impact on tourism in 2 cities that heavily depend on it cannot be underestimated.
    2. As mentioned, the outward growth of both is extensive and the two economies are quickly merging into one major urban corridor. It makes sense to add a connection between the 2 before massively expanding highway 4 (which is painfully congested entering Orlando)
    3. Looking at the maps, connecting T/SP to Orlando then connects the gulf coast to the N/S rail East coast rail connection. Blue hairs look out, there’s a future alternative to driving that Lincoln Town car back to Long Island to visit the grandkids.

    #341183

    Stewz
    Participant

    Not sure if they updated the station locations but I read a while ago that the Orlando stop wasn’t in the downtown but was actually closer to the Disney Resorts. I understand that makes sense for all of the tourists but I would think that having a stop in downtown as well would be a real bonus for the yearround residents of Orlando.

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