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The Only Way to Give Columbus a True Identity

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion The Only Way to Give Columbus a True Identity

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Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 347 total)
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  • #521778
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Gil Ligg said:
    Wow. I’m surprised by the defensiveness this post has inspired.

    If you post things that are generically condescending toward everyone in an entire city, then you shouldn’t be surprised at all that some people in that city would be offended by your remarks.

    #521779

    dubdave00
    Participant

    Gil Ligg said:
    I guess people in this city don’t give a damn what Richard Florida and others have been writing about… I’m not a cynic, just a realist.

    Realists generally don’t write off an entire group of people as “not giving a damn” based on the reaction of a message board.

    Gil Ligg said:
    Also, of course there are many people here doing awesome things, but that means nothing b/c the infrastructure and support systems to create a thriving creative class here is mediocre at best.

    The latter part of this sentence does not negate the first part.

    InnerCore said:
    The only reason Columbus doesn’t have anything better is because the people (majority) don’t want anything better.

    I think that’s probably a tad over-simplified.

    #521780
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Gil Ligg said:
    I guess people in this city don’t give a damn what Richard Florida and others have been writing about.

    We care so little that we interviewed Richard Florida about the state of the creative economy in Columbus when he came here in October to speak on the same topic:

    Richard Florida to Speak in Columbus about our Creative Economy

    #521781

    lifeontwowheels
    Participant

    InnerCore said:
    My point is that you can’t improve things like say transit when the mentality of the people is that they don’t want to improve it. Take light rail for example. Columbus and Charlotte are almost identical in size in terms of MSA’s. Charlotte has the blue line and Columbus has nothing. The only reason Columbus doesn’t have anything better is because the people (majority) don’t want anything better.

    Or the leadership in place hasn’t articulated a clear plan to sell and capture the majority. Rail had a strong showing in several polls during the 3C debate and Cincinnati has their light rail going in. Columbus can certainly have it as well but it can’t be sold simply as “x city of comparable size has y”, you need to build around Columbus.

    #521782

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    The Cincinnati project is a steetcar line rather than light rail.

    #521783
    Chris Sunami
    Chris Sunami
    Participant

    Gil Ligg said:This center must focus on supporting documentary filmmakers, entrepreneurs, artists, and computer coders that want to build things [businesses, websites, movies, art] that are innovative, socially conscious, and world-changing.

    It really is that simple. Creative people, like the kind that move to San Fran and NYC, are the only people that can make this city unique.

    I’ve lived in some of your so-called “cool cities”, Gil: New York, Boston, also Nairobi. I’m a “computer coder” and an author, married to an artist. I do innovative things on a daily basis. I’m here because I want to be here and I choose to be here (yes, even without a “creativity hub” in an abandoned mall!). There’s tons of people like me all around this city, as well as a wealth of strong organizations that support and inspire us.

    You may be new to this city, but your rhetoric isn’t. It is, however, increasingly inaccurate, and you shouldn’t be shocked, shocked that there are people willing to speak up to refute it.

    #521784

    InnerCore
    Participant

    lifeontwowheels said:
    Or the leadership in place hasn’t articulated a clear plan to sell and capture the majority. Rail had a strong showing in several polls during the 3C debate and Cincinnati has their light rail going in. Columbus can certainly have it as well but it can’t be sold simply as “x city of comparable size has y”, you need to build around Columbus.

    My point was not that you have to build everything that another city of similar size has but instead that a population similar to Columbus’ supports rail. Therefore you can’t say we don’t have the population to support it.

    As you pointed out our leadership hasn’t articulated why it’s needed. As in Columbus residents needs to be articulated to. So again, Columbus doesn’t have better public transportation because it doesn’t want it.

    Connectivity is clearly key to the creative class and from what I can tell the majority of people are currently against connectivity. I live in downtown Miami so obviously if I move back to Columbus, downtown is first on my list. So I get excited about Columbus Commons (boring architecture aside). Now obviously a large part of the reason for being downtown is to be close to Short North, Arena District and Brewery District.

    Now with all these great areas basically all located in a straight line along one street you would think there has to be something in the works for a simply rail line connecting them right? Wrong. They’ve come up in the past, failed and are no longer even being discussed.

    So while the upcoming urban options may work for me because I pretty much have to move back to Columbus, they’re not very appealing to creative young professionals as a whole.

    #521785
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    InnerCore said:
    I pretty much have to move back to Columbus

    Why’s that, if you don’t mind me asking?

    #521786

    InnerCore
    Participant

    rus said:
    Why’s that, if you don’t mind me asking?

    A bit of hyperbole on my part. I’ll be moving into the family starting stage soon and since both our families are in Columbus we’d like to raise our kids around them. And Since I can’t figure out a way to move our entire families out of Columbus, I’ll pretty much have to move back.

    #521787
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    InnerCore said:
    A bit of hyperbole on my part. I’ll be moving into the family starting stage soon and since both our families are in Columbus we’d like to raise our kids around our them. And Since I can’t figure out a way to move our entire families out of Columbus, I’ll pretty much have to move back.

    Ah, gotcha. More a preference to be around your families while raising kids than a job relocation or similar.

    Thanks.

    #521788
    Josh Lapp
    Josh Lapp
    Participant

    InnerCore said:
    Now with all these great areas basically all located in a straight line along one street you would think there has to be something in the works for a simply rail line connecting them right? Wrong. They’ve come up in the past, failed and are no longer even being discussed.

    So while the upcoming urban options may work for me because I pretty much have to move back to Columbus, they’re not very appealing to creative young professionals as a whole.

    I am as big of a rail supporter as you could possibly be, but I’m also highly aware that rail does not mean everything, especially when it comes to Columbus. The leadership of the city has focused on bringing jobs, density, urban parks, creative facilities, other amenities to the core of the city rather than expend all of its political capital and money on rail. I get the feeling that everyone knows we are headed in that direction but the leadership and the citizens of this city have worked to build a strong and sustainable core knowing that when the time is right, rail will come. For someone who is extremely enthusiastic for rail, I’d much rather have the Short North, Scioto Mile, Commons, Arena District, Gateway ect than one light rail line.

    #521789

    InnerCore
    Participant

    ChrisSunami said:
    I’ve lived in some of your so-called “cool cities”, Gil: New York, Boston, also Nairobi. I’m a “computer coder” and an author, married to an artist. I do innovative things on a daily basis. I’m here because I want to be here and I choose to be here (yes, even without a “creativity hub” in an abandoned mall!). There’s tons of people like me all around this city, as well as a wealth of strong organizations that support and inspire us.
    You may be new to this city, but your rhetoric isn’t. It is, however, increasingly inaccurate, and you shouldn’t be shocked, shocked that there are people willing to speak up to refute it.

    I think we can always find a few exceptions but they don’t make the rule. When you look at the numbers by and large the vast majority of people moving into Columbus are from neighboring deteriorating cities like Detroit and Cleveland.

    You and many others are proud of Columbus and that’s great. I think it has some good qualities as well. But that doesn’t change the fact that it’s not very equipped to fight for the next generation of creative professionals. I get it that everyone is not going to want to go to NY, Boston, LA, DC, etc. But when you look at alternatives Columbus doesn’t stack up well. Places like Denver, Portland, Minneapolis, Austin, Charlotte, etc. are doing a lot better at creating enticing environments for these people.

    #521790

    InnerCore
    Participant

    joshlapp said:
    I am as big of a rail supporter as you could possibly be, but I’m also highly aware that rail does not mean everything, especially when it comes to Columbus. The leadership of the city has focused on bringing jobs, density, urban parks, creative facilities, other amenities to the core of the city rather than expend all of its political capital and money on rail. I get the feeling that everyone knows we are headed in that direction but the leadership and the citizens of this city have worked to build a strong and sustainable core knowing that when the time is right, rail will come. For someone who is extremely enthusiastic for rail, I’d much rather have the Short North, Scioto Mile, Commons, Arena District, Gateway ect than one light rail line.

    That’s exactly what I’m talking about. If there isn’t enough public support to build a rail line down one single street that pretty much connects the only hip and urban areas that Columbus has then I think that says a lot about the mentality of the people here.

    I also don’t doubt that it won’t happen eventually. But it would be one thing if there were talks now of something being here in 5 years. But pretty much the last option started in 2006 pretty much shelved I got to believe we won’t be seeing anything for at least a decade.

    And the vast majority of everything I’m seeing in development doesn’t look that great. Maybe I’m spoiled but I studied real estate development and urbanism in grad school and I live in Miami where we have Form based zoning code. The new zoning code is doing wonders to improve the fabric of the city but it’s a process that started a while back. It just seems like Columbus is far behind the curve.

    It seems to me like the plan is to push for people to move in urban areas even if the projects and infrastructure is not very well thought out. Then wait for these places to get crowded over the next decade or so and then come back and try to actually build it right 20 years from now.

    #521791
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    InnerCore said:
    As you pointed out our leadership hasn’t articulated why it’s needed. As in Columbus residents needs to be articulated to. So again, Columbus doesn’t have better public transportation because it doesn’t want it.

    Disagree.

    There’s not something weird in the water here that makes people any more opposed or in favor of rail-based transit systems compared to any other similar city. Especially compared to similar cities that have only recently implemented new rail system of any type. There has been opposition to transit plans in every single city that has expanded transit. There’s no city that universally favors mass transit development.

    The truth is… transportation infrastructure (of any kind) typically does not go in front of the public for a vote. So it really doesn’t matter if X% of the population is in favor of it or not. It requires public leadership (and occasionally private support) to set up legislation, funding, engineering studies, construction and long term maintenance systems to get something like a light rail line or streetcar line up and running.

    So the reason we don’t have rail-based transit in Columbus has very little to do with a percentage of the population wanting it (though more people making demands certainly wouldn’t hurt). It has to do with our city, county, regional and state leadership not making it happen.

    I often compare the gap between the public’s ability to take action and the leadership’s ability to take action when it comes to mass transit versus recycling as an example of why the government needs to intervene here. While much of Columbus now has curb-side recycling service courtesy of the City, you still had an option as an individual prior. You could take your recyclables to drop off locations provided by SWACO, or directly to a private company recycling center. You didn’t need the city to take action to be able to recycle as an individual. On the flip side, you can’t ride a streetcar without a streetcar being built. There’s no available individual action that you can take to directly show support for this cause. The City (or county or region or state) has to step up first to provide the service.

    The ball is in their court.

    #521792

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    ricospaz said:
    Yes, it’s rust belt, not bible belt. and the rust belt doesn’t apply to Columbus really, we didn’t lose that much manufacturing.

    Columbus did actually lose a significant portion of its manufacturing base. The only thing was, that didn’t matter. Columbus never lived and died economically by that one industry and was easily able to cover those losses through other inudstries, such as health, education, tech, financial and business.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 347 total)

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