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The Madisons Building Downtown

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Development The Madisons Building Downtown

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 138 total)
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  • #1033349

    tonloc620
    Participant

    I am not completely sure on the city’s regulations, but I don’t think they will let you tear down a building without a plan to redevelope the site with something other than a parking lot.

    #1033359

    Graybeak
    Participant

    They don’t seem to have a problem tearing down houses and leaving empty lots.
    Of course, those aren’t businesses.

    #1036217

    futureman
    Participant

    It’s not looking so good for the buildings, could be demolished as the owner has not provided any redevelopment plans. The article says they had 30 days to do so, and according to the photo Walker posted on page 2, it has now been 30 days.

    Former Madison’s building one of two downtown properties facing demolition
    Brian R. Ball
    Staff reporter- Columbus Business First

    Two vacant downtown buildings owned by the Tonti Organization real estate investment firm could face demolition if the city does not receive an adequate redevelopment plan.

    The city shuttered the 22,000-square-foot White Haines property at 80-84 N. High St. and the former Madison’s clothing store-anchored property at 72 N. High St. in mid July. The latter property has 44,000 square feet of space.

    READ MORE: http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/news/2014/08/22/former-madison-s-building-one-of-two-downtown.html

    #1036221
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    If emergency demolitions can be declared, can’t the city (Council? Mayor?) enact emergency eminent domain?

    These buildings have been sitting crumbling for a decade. If they’re ripped down overnight because of the negligent/absentee landlord, it will be a huge black eye for city leaders.

    #1036224

    geedeck
    Participant

    Definitely a rock and a hard place. If the buildings are abandoned, they need to come down at the cost of the owners. If the city of Columbus takes them over, where does the money come from and how are they managed? Do we have the option of Campus Partners-esque third party?

    #1036232

    heresthecasey
    Participant

    I’d like to see some real investigative journalism/good old fashioned muckraking.

    Who or what persons exactly make up the “Tonti Organization”? What is their line of business? Why do they apparently feel that they have no responsibility to maintain the properties that they own to code requirements? How do they justify letting them sit and rot for 20+ years?

    Every story ever published about these buildings invariably contains the line, “calls to the owner for comment were not returned.” Why are they given a free pass to hide behind a corporate name, shirk their obligations, and avoid answering questions? Where is our local media on this?

    Dig up the info and plaster their photos on the front page. Send Tom Sussi over to their house with a camera and microphone to chase them as they head to their car. Do something besides a lazy puff piece woefully lamenting the temporary loss of three “coveted” parking spaces.

    They should at the very least be hauled into environmental court like Minnie McGee, Sam Vazirani, et al. The city needs to step up to the plate and make an example that this type of neglect and level of wanton disregard won’t be tolerated.

    #1036234

    pez
    Participant

    Definitely a rock and a hard place. If the buildings are abandoned, they need to come down at the cost of the owners. If the city of Columbus takes them over, where does the money come from and how are they managed? Do we have the option of Campus Partners-esque third party?

    The city would put a lien on the property for the cost of demolition, so they would recover the cost before it could be sold. Problem is that the demolition would then drop the assessed property value (according to the auditor) cutting taxes, while likely actually raising the value (when sold as a vacant redevelopment lot) for the owner. It’s probably cheaper for the owner to have the city take it down based on permits and local rules (asbestos, lead paint, etc.), so the owner will let them do it. I’m sure the spot won’t remain empty for long.

    #1036248

    Pablo
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>geedeck wrote:</div>
    Definitely a rock and a hard place. If the buildings are abandoned, they need to come down at the cost of the owners. If the city of Columbus takes them over, where does the money come from and how are they managed? Do we have the option of Campus Partners-esque third party?

    The city would put a lien on the property for the cost of demolition, so they would recover the cost before it could be sold. Problem is that the demolition would then drop the assessed property value (according to the auditor) cutting taxes, while likely actually raising the value (when sold as a vacant redevelopment lot) for the owner. It’s probably cheaper for the owner to have the city take it down based on permits and local rules (asbestos, lead paint, etc.), so the owner will let them do it. I’m sure the spot won’t remain empty for long.

    I’m not so sure about that – just look across the street.

    What really sucks is that the White Haines building could be a cool residential building. The windows are awesome. My guess is the Tonti Org feels it’s in their interest to have the City force the demolition of the building. I’ll bet they have no interest in renovating the buildings because they feel they can’t make any money doing so. Once the buildings are gone they can either sell them for more money (clean slate) or operate them as a parking lot. They can’t just tear down buildings for parking as was done in the past so having them condemned, they feel, is their best option. Just speculating, of course.

    #1036250

    Pro Se
    Participant

    I agree that there should be more exposure for the owners. And what will Columbus Landmarks do? Where is the organization on this?

    As for ownership, my review of the Secretary of State filings for 72-84 N High show Tom Tonti as agent. His office is only a block away in 34 N High Street and he appears to be heavily involved in real estate from my cursory on-line review. Curious why he isn’t doing more with these parcels. Maybe the renovation doesn’t offer a sufficient return on his investment. Or maybe they are waiting for land values to increase when the lots across the street are eventually developed. But this type of speculating should be frowned open when it presents such an obvious blight just a block from the literal core of our city. Hopefully the leadership will put pressure on Tonti to do the right thing here.

    #1036251

    substance
    Participant

    I’d like to see some real investigative journalism/good old fashioned muckraking.

    Who or what persons exactly make up the “Tonti Organization”? What is their line of business? Why do they apparently feel that they have no responsibility to maintain the properties that they own to code requirements? How do they justify letting them sit and rot for 20+ years?

    Every story ever published about these buildings invariably contains the line, “calls to the owner for comment were not returned.” Why are they given a free pass to hide behind a corporate name, shirk their obligations, and avoid answering questions? Where is our local media on this?

    Dig up the info and plaster their photos on the front page. Send Tom Sussi over to their house with a camera and microphone to chase them as they head to their car. Do something besides a lazy puff piece woefully lamenting the temporary loss of three “coveted” parking spaces.

    They should at the very least be hauled into environmental court like Minnie McGee, Sam Vazirani, et al. The city needs to step up to the plate and make an example that this type of neglect and level of wanton disregard won’t be tolerated.

    Absolutely, who are these people?

    #1036259
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Every story ever published about these buildings invariably contains the line, “calls to the owner for comment were not returned.” Why are they given a free pass to hide behind a corporate name, shirk their obligations, and avoid answering questions? Where is our local media on this?

    It’s not a “free pass”. If they refuse to talk, they refuse to talk.

    I imagine jumping out of a car in their parking lot with a microphone and video camera in their faces and demanding answers would result in them declining to comment.

    #1036273

    heresthecasey
    Participant

    It’s not a “free pass”. If they refuse to talk, they refuse to talk.

    I imagine jumping out of a car in their parking lot with a microphone and video camera in their faces and demanding answers would result in them declining to comment.

    Maybe, maybe not.

    Either way, the story shouldn’t end with leaving a message on their answering machine.

    Apply some pressure, drum up some publicity, start asking questions. That’s the role of investigative journalism. Shine some real light on the issue and start demanding accountability from those who can deliver it.

    If the owner won’t return calls, then seek them out in person. Find out who they are affiliated with or do business with, and then start asking them questions. What other properties do they own? What are the opinions of their tenants and neighbors? Obtain any public records or communication they’ve had with the city. Are they habitually neglectful in keeping multiple properties up to code? Call them out, ask the authorities why they aren’t being held to task, etc, etc.

    Not doing any of the above, IMO, is equivalent to a “free pass.”

    #1036940
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    I understand why it’s important, but it’s also very time consuming work that can often lead nowhere.

    We do our best with a limited staff here at CU, so hardcore investigative journalism is a bit outside our capabilities.

    That being said, I have noticed what appear to be work-trucks parked inside the fencing pretty much every day for several weeks. If I happen to be out there while someone is coming or going, I’ll ask what’s going on. But unfortunately, I can’t stand out there for 10 hours today waiting for someone who may or may not talk to me. ;)

    #1037361

    News
    Participant

    Owners of Madison’s Building to Appeal Unsafe Designation
    August 28, 2014 9:38 am – Jesse Bethea

    The owners of the vacant buildings at 72 North High will appear before the Columbus Building Commission on Sept. 16 to appeal an order by the Building and Zoning Services Department deeming the property unsafe to occupy. The order instructs the Tonti Organization, a Columbus-based real estate company, to fix the buildings’ structural deficiencies within 30 days. The order was issued approximately 30 days ago.

    READ MORE: https://www.columbusunderground.com/owners-of-madisons-building-to-appeal-unsafe-designation-jb1

    #1037363
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    FYI… Jesse plans to attend the Columbus Building Commission Meeting on September 16 to find out what Tonti has to say.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 138 total)

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