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The Next Short North?

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion The Next Short North?

Viewing 13 posts - 16 through 28 (of 28 total)
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  • #1027207
    Josh Lapp
    Josh Lapp
    Participant

    I realize that Downtown is a different beast, and has had development happening for years, but I think its the true “next Short North.” Look at what is happening on Gay Street, Discovery, & S 4th and I think that more closely resembles the old Short North than anywhere else.

    EFton is great but totally different and will have much more large scale development and institutions than SN ever has. I also consider IV & N 4th as an extension of the SN as much as Neil Ave and Harrison West are.

    #1027213
    Caleb
    Caleb
    Participant

    Plot twist: Development begins to happen rapidly in more than one of the areas listed.

    #1027215
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    You’ve got to think that a company like Wagenbrenner is 110% aware of the mixed-use possibilities in OTE. I think once Jeffrey is in full swing and Grant Commons is completed they will start looking elsewhere for development opportunities and to me OTE just seems like it fits nicely with their work.

    I’m a fan of the work of Wagenbrenner Development, but it seems like their model is mostly larger scale projects. Olde Towne East has some empty lots spread throughout, but they’re one-off single-lots where a three, maybe four-story with a maximum of 10-12 units would be about the limit of adding to a mostly residential area.

    The former Poindexter site seems like it would be more to their scale.

    That being said, I’d love to see any/all developers taking more initiative in the Near East Side in general. ;)

    #1027216
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Plot twist: Development begins to happen rapidly in more than one of the areas listed.

    I’d say development has already been happening more rapidly in Downtown, RiverSouth, Grandview Heights, 5xNW, The University District and The Brewery District than it has on Parsons or in Powell.

    Of course, that doesn’t mean any of those areas are “The Next Short North”. ;)

    #1027229

    Pablo
    Participant

    I agree that W 5th in NxNW should be on the list if we’re talking purely development. If the View on 5th project is successful, it will spur additional dense developments. The scale of 5th Ave is conducive to this type of development, similar to Grandview Ave. or N High.

    #1027429
    Caleb
    Caleb
    Participant

    I’d say development has already been happening more rapidly in Downtown, RiverSouth, Grandview Heights, 5xNW, The University District and The Brewery District than it has on Parsons or in Powell.

    Of course, that doesn’t mean any of those areas are “The Next Short North”. ;)

    More rapidly than current trends. Of course, in the case of “The Next Short North” I am going to have to say Franklinton (not just east, but west too) especially if Nationwide Realty heavily redevelops the car lot that is being vacated here soon.

    #1027443
    lazyfish
    lazyfish
    Participant

    The University District and Weinland Park are the literal natural extensions of the SN and are seeing good commercial and residential growth….

    in terms of under utilized historicy business strips the Hilltop is really nice but awful forlorn and Westgate is the latest gentrifying residential neighborhood. The days of the steal are pretty much over, but there are still plenty of great houses for very reasonable prices….

    #1027445
    lazyfish
    lazyfish
    Participant

    Those are great numbers, Walker. Congratulations to you and your team.

    Do you have a sense of how those figures compare to some of your peers around the country, or to some of your competitors locally? Or rather, is the Dispatch pulling in that kind of online readership?

    ~

    Agreed with the dissatisfaction of the article.

    interesting tangent…I had thought about a new topic “is CU dying?” the diversity of posters had diminished and for purely research purposes, I did a brief google analytic query and thought I saw roughly 7,500 daily hits, not sure about discrete users, more likely folks checking to see the resulting flaming of their posts….

    #1027451
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    interesting tangent…I had thought about a new topic “is CU dying?” the diversity of posters had diminished and for purely research purposes, I did a brief google analytic query and thought I saw roughly 7,500 daily hits, not sure about discrete users, more likely folks checking to see the resulting flaming of their posts….

    Not sure what analytics tool you utilized, but unless you’re using an installed administrative version of google analytics, then whatever you’re looking at is inaccurate.

    To answer your question and save you the research… “is CU dying?”. The answer is no.

    A quick glance at the numbers shows that the first half of 2009 compared to the first half of 2014 shows a 105% increase in pageviews (3M to 6.2M) and a 457% increase in unique visitors (237K to 1.3M). Not bad for the past five years, IMHO.

    If you’re just talking about messageboard use (and I assume you are since you’re talking about posters) then the answer is still no, though the growth of messageboard readership has slowed since 2009 (only a 43% growth in pageviews and 78% growth in unique visitors from 2009 to 2014), which was expected with the evolution of new social media platforms. There are more places for the every-day chit-chat discussions, which means our messageboard has evolved into a more specialized usage with fewer “superuser” posters and more casual readers.

    Which is why we shifted gears to become news producers and a center for event listings. That has served us well as a business to boot. In 2009 we were a company of only 1 fulltime employee (me). Today we’ve got 5 full time, 3 part time and several freelancers with plans to continue to grow through the end of the year.

    Hope that helps with your research project more than starting a messageboard topic with an attention-seeking outlandish headline would. ;) Always easier to ask directly than shout into the crowd.

    Anyhoo… looking forward to further discussing The Next Short North. ;)

    #1027460
    King Gambrinus
    King Gambrinus
    Participant

    Sorry to stay off topic, but thanks for providing those details Walker. It’s really interesting to see the growth and the amount of views the site generates and it’s very impressive. When you have to say “only 43% growth” I think that means you’re in a good spot.

    Back to the topic, I think East Franklinton is next area poised for growth. It’ll be a completely different feel than the Short North just due to the fact that’s a little more off the beaten path, ie. not on High Street, and that it’s much more of a blank slate than the Short North was. But I think it could become a vibrant district. It’s close to downtown with amazing views and the powers that be have really decided to push it forward. I do wish the city would have gone more in the direction of renovating vets and adding an attached hotel/parking garage, I think that combined with COSI it could have served as an anchor to start development (more so than an outdoor memorial). But with development on the open lots of the Scioto Peninsula you’ll see continued activity and renovation of the warehouses just on the other side of tracks.

    #1027486
    MichaelC
    MichaelC
    Participant

    I think it’s impossible to disagree with Walker’s premise–whatever “next” neighborhood there is, it will be its own, and not akin to another Short North.

    I’m with the King that East Franklinton’s got all the makings of being that “next” neighborhood. The seat of the city at its founding, the view and proximity to the soon-to-be-cleaned-up Scioto, the proximity to the freeway, to Downtown–all advantageous. There are plenty of challenges, as Walker noted upthread.

    And I agree: I don’t think a memorial is the best use of the riverfront. (COSI probably isn’t either.) But we’ll make due with what we’ve got.

    In how many other major American cities can a neighborhood, along the river and across from Downtown, be reinvented practically from scratch? Columbus must take advantage of this opportunity to build smart, and build thoughtfully.

    #1027487
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    While many have mentioned Olde Towne East, and for good reasons, few have really talked about The King-Lincoln District yet (which is where my family and I live). That’s probably for good reason as development has been somewhat sleepy over here post-recession, and outside of The Lincoln Theatre, The Gateway Building and The Whitney, there haven’t been a lot of larger-scale developments in the area in the past decade. There’s the two-year-long highway and bridge reconstruction project that some have touted as an improvement to the neighborhood, but it’s also seemingly dampered development during the process as it has cut off access to the area in different ways as ramps open/close and streets open/close.

    That being said, today’s news of investment in Poindexter is likely to give a jump-start to the area:

    https://www.columbusunderground.com/near-east-side-receives-30-million-grant-for-urban-redevelopment-plans

    That site is still a few blocks away from King-Lincoln proper (but very close to NoBo). A lot of hesitation that I’ve heard that people have had about the neighborhood revolves around the sketchier parts of Poindexter, Mount Vernon Avenue and other nearby spots that have actually transformed a lot in the past year.

    With the ground breaking quickly on some of these developments at Poindexter combined with the conclusion of highway construction in the next few weeks, my instincts tell me that we’ll continue to see a increased interest in the neighborhood in the coming years. I’m not sure exactly how that will manifest itself. At a minimum I’d expect more single-family home renovations and conversions to student housing options for CSCC & CCAD. Best-case scenario is that we’d start to see some more significant multi-story mixed-use infill on Long Street as Pro Se mentioned.

    After all… it’s all a part of the long-term plan… ;)

    MORE: https://www.columbusunderground.com/pact-plans-165-million-strategic-redevelopment-for-near-east-side

    #1027492
    Jared
    Jared
    Participant

    I think the character of the storefronts on Parsons is reminiscent of an early 1990s Short North and Schumacher Place is still at the top of my favorite former residences. It still has that underground feel that many early Short North residents desired.

Viewing 13 posts - 16 through 28 (of 28 total)

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