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The Future of The Shopping Mall

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Shopping The Future of The Shopping Mall

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
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  • #92787

    News
    Participant

    The Shopping Mall Turns 60 (and Prepares to Retire)

    EMILY BADGERJUL 13, 2012

    The enclosed suburban shopping mall has become so synonymous with the American landscape that it’s hard to imagine the original idea for it ever springing from some particular person’s imagination. Now the scheme seems obvious: of course Americans want to amble indoors in a million square feet of air-conditioned retail, of course we will need a food court because so much shopping can’t be done without meal breaks, and of course we will require 10,000 parking spaces ringing the whole thing to accommodate all our cars.

    READ MORE: http://www.theatlanticcities.com/arts-and-lifestyle/2012/07/shopping-mall-turns-60-and-prepares-retire/2568/

    #505120

    ricospaz
    Participant

    Hey, they mentioned Columbus!

    #505121
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    ricospaz said:
    Hey, they mentioned Columbus!

    We’re trendsetters! ;)

    #505122
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    Wonder how long malls will survive with this in play:

    http://www.slate.com/articles/business/small_business/2012/07/amazon_same_day_delivery_how_the_e_commerce_giant_will_destroy_local_retail_.html

    Why would Amazon give up its precious tax advantage? This week, as part of an excellent investigative series on the firm, the Financial Times’ Barney Jopson reports that Amazon’s tax capitulation is part of a major shift in the company’s operations. Amazon’s grand strategy has been to set up distribution centers in faraway, low-cost states and then ship stuff to people in more populous, high-cost states. When I order stuff from Amazon, for instance, it gets shipped to California from one of the company’s massive warehouses in Kentucky or Nevada.

    But now Amazon has a new game. Now that it has agreed to collect sales taxes, the company can legally set up warehouses right inside some of the largest metropolitan areas in the nation. Why would it want to do that? Because Amazon’s new goal is to get stuff to you immediately—as soon as a few hours after you hit Buy.

    #505123

    cheap
    Member

    a mall sure is nice on a 95 degree day with 90% humidity.

    they need to get better places to eat,though.that’s for sure.

    as for Amazon collecting sales taxes,i buy my work supplies from an outfit in Michigan,and my pet stuff from an outfit in NC,so i don’t have to pay sales tax.
    i get my stuff in a day or two.

    booyah

    #505124

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    People are always calling for the death of the USPS, but if the postal service goes away or is forced to put rates through the roof shipping on small items will also go through the roof. The USPS is the best way to send that stuff because its a lot cheaper than other methods. Couple that with the eventual expansion of sales tax to Amazon items and Amazon could be out of business for small items if it plays out that way.

    #505125

    cheap
    Member

    GCrites80s said:
    Couple that with the eventual expansion of sales tax to Amazon items and Amazon could be out of business for small items if it plays out that way.

    i am sure Ebay will follow suit,but they don’t have their shit together at all.

    #505126

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    ^ eBay’s made things so miserable for sellers that people don’t even want to deal with it. These days, eBay is a last resort for me.

    #1053219

    News
    Participant

    Express slowly backing away from traditional stores in traditional malls
    Dec 4, 2014, 12:54pm EST
    Dan Eaton
    Staff reporter – Columbus Business First

    Count Express Inc. among the retailers who don’t see malls dying, but do see that business changing. The Columbus-based retailer cited fewer mall shoppers as a reason for declining third-quarter sales. Total sales fell 1 percent to $497.6 million, while same-store sales fell 5 percent. Profit was $14.6 million, or 17 cents a share, down from last year but at the high end of the company’s guidance.

    READ MORE: http://www.bizjournals.com/columbus/blog/2014/12/express-slowly-backing-away-from-traditional.html

    #1054635
    Josh Lapp
    Josh Lapp
    Participant

    Abercrombie, Delia’s, Aeropostale: all your old favorite stores are in big trouble

    Many interesting things in this article. The most stunning may be that foot traffic at shopping malls has declined by half since 2010, all while the economy has rebounded.

    #1054645
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Many interesting things in this article. The most stunning may be that foot traffic at shopping malls has declined by half since 2010, all while the economy has rebounded.

    Shouldn’t be too surprising since the construction of new malls has been pretty much at a standstill for the past decade. If nothing new is being built, and the existing malls continue to age, their appeal would likely continue to drop, regardless of the changes in shopping preferences and growth of online shopping.

    #1104649

    News
    Participant

    As Americans Increasingly Bypass Malls, What’s To Become Of Black Friday?
    Updated November 28, 20156:35 PM ET

    Now I’m not trying to be in your business, but did you decide to sleep through yesterday’s predawn shopping sales known as door-busters? If you did, it turns out you were not alone. Increasingly, shoppers are bypassing malls and big-box stores on America’s seminal shopping holiday. To find out more about this, we called Shelly Banjo. She is a retail and consumer columnist for Bloomberg, the financial news outlet. She actually writes for Bloomberg’s new commentary website called Bloomberg Gadfly. Welcome, Shelly, thanks for coming.

    READ MORE: http://www.npr.org/2015/11/28/457708672/as-americans-increasingly-bypass-malls-whats-to-become-of-black-friday

    #1104692

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    Frankly as a mall retailer, I’m glad Black Friday has become watered down. It wasn’t any fun back in say 2008 (the late-2000s were Peak Black Friday) when it became less about selling things and more about crowd control and preventing rioting. I remember working that one at Florence Y’all and having my co-workers let into the store by Security since it was the only way to get through the wall-to-wall people with no back door at our location there. Sure we sold a lot of stuff, but UGH. The rest of November was terribly slow back then. Now the commerce is more evenly spread out through the month. That saves on labor cost.

    Although I hate working Thanksgiving (especially until 1AM), we are probably stuck with it in order to prevent death and destruction the next day. And the last 10 days before Xmas were always still more important anyway. I wouldn’t mind doing away with the 6AM stuff either. You actually don’t do that much business anymore that early since you were open the day before. 8AM would be fine.

    #1104708
    vestanpance
    vestanpance
    Participant

    Sometimes I crave mall Chinese food.

    #1104715
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Sometimes I crave mall Chinese food.

    So what you need then is a mall food court without the mall? ;)

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)

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