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National Trend: Americans are Driving Less

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Transportation National Trend: Americans are Driving Less

  • This topic has 108 replies, 29 voices, and was last updated 4 years ago by News.
Viewing 15 posts - 91 through 105 (of 109 total)
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  • #457358

    News
    Participant

    We’re Driving Less, Taking Transit More. Now Let’s Invest Accordingly
    Posted December 9, 2013

    A comprehensive new analysis of government data demonstrates that Americans are driving less per person, and taking transit more, both overall and in a strong majority of our large metro areas. Especially because the new report is consistent with a multitude of information showing changes in living patterns and lifestyle preferences, we should shift more public resources into transit, to keep up with and strengthen the trends toward more sustainable modes of transportation.

    READ MORE: http://sustainablecitiescollective.com/kaidbenfield/205241/were-driving-less-taking-transit-more-now-lets-invest-accordingly

    #457359

    Analogue Kid
    Participant

    ^ That article kind of hints at it, but I think the larger trend we are seeing now is what Joel Kotkin refers to as “Peak Office”. There was a rush of jobs to the Suburbs over the past 40 years that drove people to drive further, but that has pretty much leveled off now. http://www.forbes.com/sites/joelkotkin/2013/11/05/american-cities-may-have-hit-peak-office/

    #457360

    gramarye
    Participant

    Wow … I think Joel Kotkin might have just written an article I agree with. I certainly hadn’t expected that.

    With respect to Ohio, at least, I think he’s absolutely right. There is a tremendous amount of already-built office space for lease in the area and much of the “new” space coming online is going to be a rehabbing of older spaces. The former Goodyear HQ, for example, will be redeveloped because Goodyear just built a new one; much of the “new” office space in downtown Akron, meanwhile, is on the south end of downtown in restored Goodrich buildings.

    Between “peak office” and “peak retail,” it wouldn’t surprise me if new construction remained at a very low level for a long time, and office-to-residential conversions picked up again as well if and when we do start to see a housing recovery.

    #457361

    InnerCore
    Participant

    Analogue Kid said:
    ^ That article kind of hints at it, but I think the larger trend we are seeing now is what Joel Kotkin refers to as “Peak Office”. There was a rush of jobs to the Suburbs over the past 40 years that drove people to drive further, but that has pretty much leveled off now. http://www.forbes.com/sites/joelkotkin/2013/11/05/american-cities-may-have-hit-peak-office/

    On a similar note:

    Companies Say Goodbye to the ‘Burbs

    http://finance.yahoo.com/news/companies-goodbye-burbs-004800326.html

    Cheap real estate, tax incentives, and easy automobile access once lured companies to the suburbs, but companies now want urban amenities, proximity to public transit and sense of community—the same qualities young workers prize when deciding where to live and work, said Robert Lang, an urban planning expert and director of Brookings Mountain West.

    And highly educated workers are clustering in a small number of cities. In 2010, more than 43% of Americans with bachelor’s degrees chose to live in 20 metropolitan areas, primarily tech hubs such as Seattle, San Francisco and Raleigh, N.C., according to research from the Brookings Institution. And as younger graduates marry and start families later than previous generations—often with both spouses pursuing careers—they’re delaying moves to the suburbs, sometimes indefinitely.

    This reflects a lot of the trends we’ve being seeing nationwide throughout our properties. Young people are moving to urban walkable areas where they want to live and employers are recognizing this and following not the other way around.

    I think this underscores the importance of making the Cincinnati streetcar work and also getting something comparable here.

    #457362
    Tom Over
    Tom Over
    Participant

    GCrites80s said:
    I just got my first smart phone a couple weeks ago. I had always heard about the technology making people less interested in driving and all that, but knew there were certainly lots of other factors at play as well. Well, I dropped my car off at a shop to get the brake fluid changed and had my mother pick me up. Being a passenger in a car with her driving is very boring; she drives quite slowly and hesitates a lot. So I started messing around with the phone, I blinked, and we were back at the farm. Using the phone to keep me occupied rather than staring at a bunch of corn and ribbon development was like stepping through a warp zone. I can now see why people are rejecting driving (especially alone) in favor of rail commutes because of these devices.

    Me too. But even before the ubiquity of mobile communication devices, I noticed back in the early 90s on the trolley and buses in San Diego that not driving allows for people watching, jotting notes and reading (library books, magazines, newspapers, and other physical publications.) Public transit also allows for interaction with new people. I won’t spew cars-are-evil nonsense. But on many levels, driving an automobile seems inferior to public transit, in terms of how we use energy, build community, and take better care of Lover Nature.

    #457363

    News
    Participant

    A Little Less Driving Means Big Dividends For Local Economies
    BEN SCHILLER
    December 18, 2013 | 9:13 AM

    Helping people to drive less could lead to big savings, as a new analysis by CEOs for Cities shows. If everyone in the 51 largest metro areas reduced driving by one mile per day on average, the U.S. as a whole could save $31 billion a year. And here’s the thing: that money would likely go to more productive use than it does today being tied up in the fossil fuel economy.

    READ MORE: http://www.fastcoexist.com/3021152/a-little-less-driving-means-big-dividends-for-local-economies

    #457364

    News
    Participant

    Are We Shedding Urban Driving?
    Posted January 2, 2014

    us cars highwayThe long term trend of car dependence has been a source of growing debate among scholars and enthusiasts, whether or not the shift to the millennial generation is marked by a decrease in car ownership and a change in driving patterns. Given the rippling effects that significant declining car use could have on the American economy and its development moving forward, eyes are watching closely to see whether or not its actually happening.

    READ MORE: http://sustainablecitiescollective.com/tcaine/210991/are-we-shedding-urban-driving

    #457365

    brytown
    Member

    A car commercial that promotes transit

    I saw a Nissan Commercial during the Rose Bowl for a car which has the ability to jump on top of trains in order to beat other automobile commuters (cyclists are also seen rushing past the traffic jam):

    Seems to me that Nissan is not only acknowledging that transit and cycling are more efficient modes of transportation, but that beating the commute times of those modes is nothing but fantasy.

    “Fantasy, do not attempt. Cars can’t jump on trains.”

    #457366

    jackoh
    Participant

    Yes. A public acknowledgement (by a car company, no less) that even private cars need to take public transportation in order to get where they want to go effectively and efficiently.

    #457367

    News
    Participant

    Has the U.S. Passed Peak Gasoline?
    By Julia Pyper and ClimateWire

    American drivers are consuming less and less fuel, following a trend of reduced car ownership and distance traveled, according to a new report by the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI).

    READ MORE: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=has-the-us-passed-peak-gasoline

    #457368

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    jackoh said:
    Yes. A public acknowledgement (by a car company, no less) that even private cars need to take public transportation in order to get where they want to go effectively and efficiently.

    Well, somebody could say that the reason the car got there so fast is that the car was able to drive 60 on top of a train that was already going 60 itself for a combined 120 mph.

    #457369

    News
    Participant

    Wednesday, January 22, 2014
    Ford CEO: More Cars in Cities “Not Going to Work”
    by Angie Schmitt

    It’s the last thing you would expect to hear at the Detroit Auto Show from the CEO of Ford Motor Company. But last week, Ford’s Alan Mulally showed some ambivalence about the role of cars in major cities.

    “I think the most important thing is to look at the way the world is and where the world is going and to develop a plan,” Mulally said, according to the Financial Times. “We’re going to see more and more larger cities. Personal mobility is going to be of really ever-increasing importance to livable lifestyles in big cities.”

    READ MORE: http://dc.streetsblog.org/2014/01/22/ford-ceo-more-cars-in-cities-not-going-to-work/

    #457370

    mattmonta
    Participant

    Why Do the Smartest Cities Have the Smallest Share of Cars?[/url]
    Derek Thompson, The Atlantic, January 22, 2014

    “Small crowded cities get clogged, and clogged cities require the kind of effective public transportation that makes cars an expensive nice-to-have rather than a have-to-have.”

    #1020275

    News
    Participant

    Vehicle Miles Driven: Another Population-Adjusted Low
    By Doug Short | Market Overview | May 25, 2014 05:53AM GMT

    The Department of Transportation’s Federal Highway Commission has released the latest report on Traffic Volume Trends, data through March. Travel on all roads and streets changed by 0.2% (0.5 billion vehicle miles) for March 2014 as compared with March 2013 (see report). However, if we factor in population growth, the civilian population-adjusted data (age 16-and-over) is at a another new post-Financial Crisis low, as is the total population-adjusted variant.

    READ MORE: http://www.investing.com/analysis/vehicle-miles-driven:-another-population-adjusted-low-213910

    #1036816

    News
    Participant

    Have Americans really fallen out of love with driving?
    by Chris Matthews @crobmatthews AUGUST 15, 2014, 11:48 AM EDT

    The number of miles Americans are driving has remained stagnant over the past several years. Is this the end of American car culture?

    READ MORE: http://fortune.com/2014/08/15/america-driving-cars/

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