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The Awkward Art of Neighborhood Naming

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion The Awkward Art of Neighborhood Naming

Viewing 15 posts - 106 through 120 (of 126 total)
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  • #475254

    gramarye
    Participant

    Twixlen said:
    There is so much truth to this. Additionally, Area Commissioners need not even reside in the neighborhood where they’re posted – they only need to own property there, creating another layer of complication for the folks that *are* residents, since the interest of non-residing land owners can run totally counter to the interests of those that do.

    I *think* what SusanB is referring to, and has had great success with, is a specific neighborhood association/group. Which is a different animal than the Area Commissions. If anything, my experience has shown that the Area Commission will act outside the will of its neighborhood groups, or represent itself to the city inconsistent with the will of its residents, because the interests of the individuals on the Commission are so far flung from those of the residents.

    I think a system where individual neighborhood groups – even though there are so many of them – are respected at the city level would be much more impactful.

    To the extent that you’re drawing a distinction between area commissions and neighborhood associations, however, I would equally oppose giving neighborhood associations de facto veto power over development decisions, however–even just informal veto power by having the actual city government essentially always defer to the decisions of the neighborhood association.

    Manatee: The issue is that even if an area commission or neighborhood association is completely open to membership and participation to residents and/or property owners in a given area, that means that insiders get 100% representation and outsiders–prospective residents, prospective business owners, etc.–get none. Insiders often have incentives to restrict development in desirable areas because it drives up the price of real estate already in the area (restricting the supply of housing or commercial space or what have you). That is good for the insiders but bad for the community as a whole.

    #475255

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    Coy <a href=”https://www.columbusunderground.com/forums/topic

    That being said, it seems to have gotten a little out of hand.
    I lived in Schumacher Place (about 2 blocks from the rigid German Village demarcation line), but I had to tell everyone that I lived in GV, or else they had no idea what I was talking about.
    Same with Discovery District. It was probably helpful in the creation of this area being a Special Improvements District, but most folks have no idea where it is.
    I’m always like “Discov…, nevermind. Downtown, right next to OTE”.

    Just my experience, but most people who say they’re from Columbus don’t have a clue about all the neighborhood breakdowns.

    New folks to town haven’t had the media tell them that there’s only 6 neighborhoods in the city limits their entire lives. People over 70 know ’em. I’ve noticed that the paper has been coming around on recognizing neighborhoods, though.

    #475256
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    GCrites80s said:
    New folks to town haven’t had the media tell them that there’s only 6 neighborhoods in the city limits their entire lives.

    Yup: https://www.columbusunderground.com/forums/topic/frustration-with-inaccuratemisleading-geographic-locations-in-media-reporting

    #475257

    Twixlen
    Participant

    gramarye said:
    To the extent that you’re drawing a distinction between area commissions and neighborhood associations, however, I would equally oppose giving neighborhood associations de facto veto power over development decisions, however–even just informal veto power by having the actual city government essentially always defer to the decisions of the neighborhood association.

    I actually wasn’t thinking in terms of the Commission or neighborhood group having veto power over development/city plans – and agree that there’s a diminishing return on them having that ability (I’m thinking of crazy Clintonville, in particular). At the same time – shouldn’t the voice of the neighborhood mean something? If a large enough group of residents band together and are for or against something in particular, shouldn’t that matter to the city? There has to be some sort of ability for the neighborhood to represent itself.

    #475258
    Manatee
    Manatee
    Participant

    Yeah, I’ve got to say guys– this is really confusing me. If the positions are voted on, how is it not democratic? And some people are complaining that outsiders won’t have a voice, while others are saying absentee property owners would have too much of a say. Thanks for trying to explain it to me, but I’m politically challenged– it’s probably best I don’t understand certain things :)

    I wonder if I have a neighborhood association/commission out here in Alexandria where I live? I have half a mind to poke my nose into one to see what happens. I know the commissioners out in SW Ohio where I lived last year were a bit of a tough bunch– not very excited about a tax-exempt nature preserve. I’m sure there’s probably one in nearby Granville… those folks take their neighborhood seriously!

    #475259

    Twixlen
    Participant

    Manatee said:
    Yeah, I’ve got to say guys– this is really confusing me. If the positions are voted on, how is it not democratic? And some people are complaining that outsiders won’t have a voice, while others are saying absentee property owners would have too much of a say. Thanks for trying to explain it to me, but I’m politically challenged– it’s probably best I don’t understand certain things :)

    I wonder if I have a neighborhood association/commission out here in Alexandria where I live? I have half a mind to poke my nose into one to see what happens. I know the commissioners out in SW Ohio where I lived last year were a bit of a tough bunch– not very excited about a tax-exempt nature preserve. I’m sure there’s probably one in nearby Granville… those folks take their neighborhood seriously!

    The voting is pretty much a farce. I’ve witnessed the person running the ballot boxes telling people who to vote for. SO, there’s that.

    And the divergent opinions are likely different personal experiences with different commissions – and I would say, the only way to fully understand how these things operate (and commissions operate differently than associations/groups), is to be involved in them.

    #1069621

    Graybeak
    Participant

    I was just reading some of the news about a missing student in Minnesota from the “Dinkytown neighborhood”.

    #1069863

    thecandlelab
    Participant

    I can’t speak for all of them, but I know in Grandview the situation has reached the level of completely ridiculous. As mentioned earlier, we suffer from the fact that Grandview’s main business district is Grandview Avenue between 1st and 5th. Half of that is in Grandview Heights and the other half in Columbus, and more specifically the 5xNW area. There is nobody – and I mean nobody – in that area that wants 5xNW branding or planning anywhere near the Avenue, and yet they continue to stick these monstrous signs in front of businesses who don’t want them there, just so they can pee on their little territory. We as merchants are trying to brand a business district as a destination, and know full well that our visitors don’t care when they step from Grandview Heights into the 5xNW area – they just want to “go to Grandview” to grab dinner and drinks. Its an infuriating situation that yields no benefit and tons of headache for the businesses.

    #1069888

    Graybeak
    Participant

    5XNW is so Fetch.

    #1069889
    vestanpance
    vestanpance
    Participant

    our visitors don’t care when they step from Grandview Heights into the 5xNW area – they just want to “go to Grandview”

    I would venture to guess that’s what 99% of your customers already think.

    #1069923

    gramarye
    Participant

    There is nobody – and I mean nobody – in that area that wants 5xNW branding or planning anywhere near the Avenue, and yet they continue to stick these monstrous signs in front of businesses who don’t want them there, just so they can pee on their little territory.

    Who’s the “they?”

    #1069968

    thecandlelab
    Participant

    The “they” is the 5xNW commission. I will take a couple photos when I am down there tomorrow and post them, so you can see what it looks like when a commission decides to lift its leg and try to mark a territory as theirs, regardless of the wishes of the businesses those signs block.

    #1070152

    drew
    Participant

    I feel for all of the businesses on the Grandview strip. They have the wackos from the 5xNW commission pushing their ill-conceived identity on them, and then they have Destination Grandview promoting the entire area under the Grandview brand. Makes no sense!

    For what its worth, I don’t think they’ll ever get much traction in changing popular opinion of the name of the area south of 5th. Even so, it might be worth it to organize the business between 3rd & 5th on Grandview ave and get them to put consistent Grandview-branded signage in the windows as a show of protest and to reinforce the obvious.

    #1070167
    vestanpance
    vestanpance
    Participant

    If I were one of those business owners I just wouldn’t care. Like you said, no matter how many signs they put up the general public are still going to call it Grandview.

    #1070411

    thecandlelab
    Participant

    Here are the two photos I promised above. One is a monstrosity of a bike rack that the businesses on that block fought because it really chokes off walking traffic and visibility, and the second is a sign stuck right in the middle of the sidewalk by the Grandview Cafe. Nothing says “This is our turf” like making people walk around your sign in the hopes of building your commission’s brand.


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