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Bricking South Third Street in German Village

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Development Bricking South Third Street in German Village

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 40 total)
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  • #470804
    RonDo
    RonDo
    Participant

    Must be awesome to plow snow over bricks.

    I’d rather the speed limit dropped and elongated speed bumps rather than bricks. Roads in Columbus are bad enough in beating down my cars’ alignment and suspension.

    #470805

    MHJ
    Participant

    columbusmike said:
    Why exactly does anyone need to go so fast through a neighborhood? The bumpy, old brick streets actually help to slow traffic and make it safer for kids and other pedestrians. Not to mention, I believe there is even a school on 3rd that would benefit from this.

    I am not exaggerating when I say 5 mph. If you go over 15 mph over those brick streets, your car is jumping all over the place. And sorry, it’s unreasonable for people to have to drive 15 mph on a city street. It’s one thing on those back streets, but it would be a terrible thing for the main thoroughfare through the city.

    I suggest you visit some other cities with brick streets. It doesn’t have to be such an uneven, bumpy ride.

    #470806

    Twixlen
    Participant

    MHJ said:
    I am not exaggerating when I say 5 mph. If you go over 15 mph over those brick streets, your car is jumping all over the place. And sorry, it’s unreasonable for people to have to drive 15 mph on a city street. It’s one thing on those back streets, but it would be a terrible thing for the main thoroughfare through the city.

    I suggest you visit some other cities with brick streets. It doesn’t have to be such an uneven, bumpy ride.

    It entirely depends on the street. Some places, it *is* very bumpy – the streets have heaved due to tree roots and whatnot. But it’s not like the whole of the more main streets that are brick in GV are like that, and for such a tightly compacted village, 15 mph is about all that’s needed on streets that aren’t two-lane wide, with so many parked cars & people out and about.

    If 3rd were bricked, it’s not like it would be in that sort of shape – newly laid bricks are smooth, as you’ve mentioned. It takes maintenance, the same as a paved street. There have been sections of main thoroughfares all through the city, that are paved, that end up being terribly bumpy – it’s the nature of time + roads.

    ETA – we all do visit other places that have bricked streets. One of them is called “The Arena District.”

    #470807

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    God forbid every neighborhood detail not revolving around cars.

    #470808

    Twixlen
    Participant

    RonDo said:
    Must be awesome to plow snow over bricks.

    I’d rather the speed limit dropped and elongated speed bumps rather than bricks. Roads in Columbus are bad enough in beating down my cars’ alignment and suspension.

    FYI – they don’t plow over speed humps either.

    #470809

    News
    Participant

    Study to Take Another Look at Third Street Options in German Village
    Published on April 7, 2013 8:00 am
    By: Brent Warren

    The Columbus City Council has approved the use of Urban Infrastructure Recovery Funds to pay for a preliminary engineering study of South Third Street in German Village. The $500,000 study is the first concrete step in what has been a years-long discussion among village residents about aesthetic and safety-related improvements along the corridor.

    READ MORE: https://www.columbusunderground.com/study-to-take-another-look-at-third-street-options-in-german-village-bw1

    #470810

    MHJ
    Participant

    Twixlen said:
    It entirely depends on the street. Some places, it *is* very bumpy – the streets have heaved due to tree roots and whatnot. But it’s not like the whole of the more main streets that are brick in GV are like that, and for such a tightly compacted village, 15 mph is about all that’s needed on streets that aren’t two-lane wide, with so many parked cars & people out and about.

    If 3rd were bricked, it’s not like it would be in that sort of shape – newly laid bricks are smooth, as you’ve mentioned. It takes maintenance, the same as a paved street. There have been sections of main thoroughfares all through the city, that are paved, that end up being terribly bumpy – it’s the nature of time + roads.

    ETA – we all do visit other places that have bricked streets. One of them is called “The Arena District.”

    haha…good point about the Arena District. That’s really all I’m saying: being forced to go 15 mph down Third Street, the main thoroughfare in German Village is a bad idea, so the bricking needs to be smooth. Just uncovering the bricks that may already exist below the asphalt on Third Street would just make it unfriendly to anybody who doesn’t already live there.

    But really….you all are being absolutely ridiculous when you say 15 mph is as fast as a car needs to go on a residential street. I’m willing to bet that none of you EVER do that, even when school zone signs are flashing and say the speed limit is 20. Just stop it.

    #470811

    Twixlen
    Participant

    MHJ said:

    But really….you all are being absolutely ridiculous when you say 15 mph is as fast as a car needs to go on a residential street. I’m willing to bet that none of you EVER do that, even when school zone signs are flashing and say the speed limit is 20. Just stop it.

    In German Village? Beyond the main streets of High, or 3rd, or Whittier, there is no earthly need for anyone to go much more than 15mph.

    And yeah, I pass through the school zone, in full flash, on W Broad Street at Hague all the time – and I slow down. The amount of time it takes for someone to slow the hell down, pay attention – it’s a very simple right thing, and it doesn’t cost anything. I would like for people to drive conscientiously in my own neighborhood, I’m going to extend the same courtesy when driving through the neighborhoods of others.

    #470812
    Coremodels
    Coremodels
    Participant

    I drive 20-25 on most of the GV roads tops, really no reason to go faster. Between pedestrians, tourists, cars pulling out blind from intersections behind parked cars, etc. driving much faster on 3rd is next to impossible.

    And yeah, I drive no faster than 20 in school zones…ever.

    #470813

    tdziemia
    Participant

    Do the math, guys …

    It’s what, 3/4 mile from Livingston to the park? So, if you drive the entire length of Third St at 30 mph that takes you 1 1/2 minutes. At 15 mph it takes you 3 minutes.

    So we are arguing over a minute and a half, and calling that objectionable? Really?

    I’d find it more of an issue if the maintenance costs are higher for brick … or the re-installation costs when you need to dig. For me, those are valid points … not a minute and a half in the car.

    #470814

    MHJ
    Participant

    Twixlen said:
    In German Village? Beyond the main streets of High, or 3rd, or Whittier, there is no earthly need for anyone to go much more than 15mph.

    And again — AGAIN — my entire point is that Third Street IS a main street, it’s unreasonable to expect people to drive 15 mph down that road. You’ve conceded that. Twice. So we agree on that.

    And you misconstrued my point about school zones. It was that, even when you slow down for school zones, you’re probably still going 19 or 20 mph, not 15.

    tdziemia said:
    Do the math, guys …

    It’s what, 3/4 mile from Livingston to the park? So, if you drive the entire length of Third St at 30 mph that takes you 1 1/2 minutes. At 15 mph it takes you 3 minutes.

    So we are arguing over a minute and a half, and calling that objectionable? Really?

    I’d find it more of an issue if the maintenance costs are higher for brick … or the re-installation costs when you need to dig. For me, those are valid points … not a minute and a half in the car.

    No. Third Street is not a local street. It’s a connector. Most people’s car trips on Third are not local trips. They’re passing through GV, coming from another neighborhood to GV, or leaving GV to go somewhere else. On that type of street, 15 mph is not an optimal speed. People generally will be traveling at 25-30 mph.

    #470815

    MHJ
    Participant

    Twixlen said:
    In German Village? Beyond the main streets of High, or 3rd, or Whittier, there is no earthly need for anyone to go much more than 15mph.

    And again — AGAIN — my entire point is that Third Street IS a main street, it’s unreasonable to expect people to drive 15 mph down that road. You’ve conceded that. Twice. So we agree on that.

    And you misconstrued my point about school zones. It was that, even when you slow down for school zones, you’re probably still going 19 or 20 mph, not 15.

    tdziemia said:
    Do the math, guys …

    It’s what, 3/4 mile from Livingston to the park? So, if you drive the entire length of Third St at 30 mph that takes you 1 1/2 minutes. At 15 mph it takes you 3 minutes.

    So we are arguing over a minute and a half, and calling that objectionable? Really?

    I’d find it more of an issue if the maintenance costs are higher for brick … or the re-installation costs when you need to dig. For me, those are valid points … not a minute and a half in the car.

    No. Third Street is not a local street. It’s a connector. Most people’s car trips on Third are not local trips. They’re passing through GV, coming from another neighborhood to GV, or leaving GV to go somewhere else. On that type of street, 15 mph is not an optimal speed. People generally will be traveling at 25-30 mph.

    #470816
    Coremodels
    Coremodels
    Participant

    MHJ said:

    No. Third Street is not a local street. It’s a connector. Most people’s car trips on Third are not local trips. They’re passing through GV, coming from another neighborhood to GV, or leaving GV to go somewhere else.

    No…they’re not.

    The section of 3rd Street in question runs from a dead end at Schiller Park to Livingston Ave. Its a half mile long. It has a changing light, multiple pedestrian crossings, and a school zone all inside of it. Its a single lane going either way with parked cars lining both sides.

    There’s no reason to be going faster than 20 for that .5 miles.

    #470817

    FoodFort
    Participant

    There is a pretty good chance the bricks are still on third, just paved over. So, it could be a great recycling project to remove the asphalt and re-lay the bricks that hopefully are underneath. As for maintainance, many of the streets in the area were paved with bricks in the 1890’s and still going strong.

    Blocks in the Wild: German Village, Part I

    #470818

    MHJ
    Participant

    Coremodels said:
    No…they’re not.

    The section of 3rd Street in question runs from a dead end at Schiller Park to Livingston Ave. Its a half mile long. It has a changing light, multiple pedestrian crossings, and a school zone all inside of it. Its a single lane going either way with parked cars lining both sides.

    There’s no reason to be going faster than 20 for that .5 miles.

    Yes…they are. LOL. Are we just going to go back and forth saying yes/no?

    The section of Third Street in question is not a local street. It’s a collector. The general hierarchy of road design is (1) local or residential streets, which strictly serve local land uses (2) collectors or secondary streets, which serve some local land uses, but also collect traffic from local streets (3) arterials or major roads, whose major purpose is to move traffic and allow access to other streets and (4) freeways, which are limited access and facilitate travel over long distances.

    In that hierarchy, Third Street is a collector street, not a local street. As a collector street, it needs to have a higher speed limit in order to facilitate traffic flow. I’m not on here arguing that people need to go 40 mph down Third Street. That’s not what that street is there for. But people do need to go 25-30 mph on that road in order to keep the traffic flow reasonable. And that’s not inconsistent with having multiple crosswalks or some local land uses. The type of bumpy, un-maintained bricking that exists on local streets in German Village is inconsistent with the type of road Third Street is. If re-bricking Third Street keeps it smooth, I’m all for it. If it makes it like GV’s side streets, it’s a bad idea for the neighborhood.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 40 total)

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