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SN's Bollinger Tower being bought, possibly converted to hotel

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Development SN's Bollinger Tower being bought, possibly converted to hotel

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 70 total)
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  • #1116332
    Ned23
    Ned23
    Participant

    I don’t think they build all that much housing anymore. They mostly subcontract from the private sector.

    #1116383
    derm
    derm
    Participant

    This is a Short North wide effect.

    The NNEMAP food pantry just north of Bodega recently lost its lease as the property was deemed too valuable for this use. The silver lining is that they found a much nicer/larger/better parking(looking at all the Lexus driving Yoga people who went to Yoga on High) to serve the neighbors on 11th about 5-10 minutes away. Now however, they have triple the parking, a better walk through shopping experience, and a lesser rent so that they can provide a better service.

    #1116415
    Ned23
    Ned23
    Participant

    I think it’s just the case that there is always this hope that we can have true mixed-income neighborhoods, but the reality is that just doesn’t happen.

    #1116421
    Posole
    Posole
    Participant

    Looks like they’re building a brand new senior center on East Main St. according to the front page. So, this isn’t the end of the world. Just a very unfortunate inconvenience for the current residents.

    #1116429

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    I think it’s just the case that there is always this hope that we can have true mixed-income neighborhoods, but the reality is that just doesn’t happen.

    It happens, but it’s just that these mixed-income neighborhoods are not stable. What I mean by that is that the period in which they are really mixed tends to be a snapshot in time as they transition to something else, whether that is a gentrified, higher-income neighborhood, or a poor, declined neighborhood. When I did my maps on incomes and the differences between the highest and lowest brackets, that was pretty clear. It seems rare to get mixed-income neighborhoods that are not being pushed one way or another. Unlike some of the discussion here, poor residents getting pushed out is not the only direction neighborhoods can go in. The opposite happens all the time as well, though in that case, the higher income residents don’t leave because they’re being priced out, but because the neighborhood is seeing decline. It’s hard to maintain the balance. For example, Franklinton is severely segregated in terms of incomes, with it leaning heavily towards the low-income side. All of the new activity there, especially east of 315, will raise incomes and eventually at least that area will be mixed. The problem is that all those improvements and projects will just continue to raise the neighborhood’s profile and continue to attract even more development and more higher incomes until the balance is tipped the other way. You are just not going to get a rising neighborhood to just stop changing in some Goldilocks zone once that process has begun.

    All that said, at least as late as 2014, the Short North actually was in the Goldilocks zone. How long it stays there is the question.

    #1116513

    SusanB
    Participant

    The new senior housing being built is privatized, with a non profit partner as a “fiscal agent” to get the government funding. On the South Side its NRP (out of Cleveland) and the Church For All People. Big monies involved. So far the senior housing at the old Shottensteins site is ok but the stand alone LITC houses (not designated as senior, just mostly voucher Section 8) has had some issues. As we knew that they would. The Reeb Hosack neighborhood is a designated poor people dumping ground with crappy COTA service and no real grocery stores within walking distance. Nor is it safe to walk in after dark. We argued for owner occupied homes and the only organization that agreed was Habitat. But they are only building 3 or 4 of their houses and they are actually in Hungarian Village, not Reeb Hosack as far as I know. <Sigh>.

    #1116516

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    The new senior housing being built is privatized, with a non profit partner as a “fiscal agent” to get the government funding. On the South Side its NRP (out of Cleveland) and the Church For All People. Big monies involved. So far the senior housing at the old Shottensteins site is ok but the stand alone LITC houses (not designated as senior, just mostly voucher Section 8) has had some issues. As we knew that they would. The Reeb Hosack neighborhood is a designated poor people dumping ground with crappy COTA service and no real grocery stores within walking distance. Nor is it safe to walk in after dark. We argued for owner occupied homes and the only organization that agreed was Habitat. But they are only building 3 or 4 of their houses and they are actually in Hungarian Village, not Reeb Hosack as far as I know. <Sigh>.

    Eh, I’m not sure how true this is. Reeb-Hosack has seen household income increase by more than 50% between 2000-2014, which is faster than most other areas in Franklin County. The % of population in the neighborhood that made below $25K a year has dropped about 10 points between 2000 and 2014. Both middle and upper class incomes have risen. Even if a bunch of low-income people are being “dumped” into the neighborhood, it would seem that they are being offset by people with higher incomes or they are actually moving out of the neighborhood altogether.

    #1116522
    DC
    DC
    Participant

    Eh, I’m not sure how true this is. Reeb-Hosack has seen household income increase by more than 50% between 2000-2014, which is faster than most other areas in Franklin County. The % of population in the neighborhood that made below $25K a year has dropped about 10 points between 2000 and 2014. Both middle and upper class incomes have risen. Even if a bunch of low-income people are being “dumped” into the neighborhood, it would seem that they are being offset by people with higher incomes or they are actually moving out of the neighborhood altogether.

    Interesting info. Appreciate the insight. Do you happen to have statistics on the area east of Parsons, near Children’s Hospital and such?

    #1116625
    Ned23
    Ned23
    Participant

    I don’t get how they can call something “privatized” when it still depends on public revenue.

    #1116626

    SusanB
    Participant

    jbcmh81 where are you getting these stats from? While I can believe that income in Reeb Hosack has increased (it’s easy to go up from next to nothing) I can certainly tell you that the area is far from “middle class” by any stretch of the imagination. I live 2 streets away and I am in the area on foot almost every day. I’d be very shocked if average household incomes were over 30k a year.

    Here’s what I found:
    http://www.city-data.com/neighborhood/Reeb-Hosack-Columbus-OH.html

    and this:

    http://places.findthehome.com/l/163426/Reeb-Hosack-Columbus-OH

    Low Income

    Approximately 50.8% of Reeb-Hosack’s population has an annual household income below $25,000 which means that most residents live in low income households. This is a high percentage of low income households for Columbus and Columbus Metro.
    Lower Middle Class

    The second most common household income level is lower middle class with approximately 36.4% of Reeb-Hosack’s residents living in a household earning an annual income between $25,000 and $50,000.

    #1116632

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    1116626]jbcmh81 where are you getting these stats from? While I can believe that income in Reeb Hosack has increased (it’s easy to go up from next to nothing) I can certainly tell you that the area is far from “middle class” by any stretch of the imagination. I live 2 streets away and I am in the area on foot almost every day. I’d be very shocked if average household incomes were over 30k a year.

    I got it from census data on census tracts. Reeb-Hossack is made up of tract 61 in case you are interested.
    I didn’t actually say that R-H is middle class, only that middle and upper class incomes had increased. It is still more of a low income neighborhood than not.
    Here is the median household income for tract 61 by year:
    2000: $20,398
    2010: $23,189
    2014: $31,607

    Here were the percentages of total households that had these income levels.
    Less than $25K
    2000: 57.9%
    2014: 47.2%
    $25K-$49.9K
    2000: 29.1%
    2014: 29.2%
    $50K-$99.9K
    2000: 11.3%
    2014: 17.7%
    $100K and Over
    2000: 1.7%
    2014: 5.7%

    Based on this factor alone, I think this area is probably at least in the very early stages of gentrification, but not necessarily that poor people are getting dumped there. The actual totals in population with the lowest incomes have declined.

    Here’s what I found:<br>

    Low Income
    Approximately 50.8% of Reeb-Hosack’s population has an annual household income below $25,000 which means that most residents live in low income households. This is a high percentage of low income households for Columbus and Columbus Metro.<br>
    Lower Middle Class

    The second most common household income level is lower middle class with approximately 36.4% of Reeb-Hosack’s residents living in a household earning an annual income between $25,000 and $50,000.

    It seems your links match my numbers above pretty well, but they are just from slightly different time periods.

    #1116635

    jbcmh81
    Participant

    Interesting info. Appreciate the insight. Do you happen to have statistics on the area east of Parsons, near Children’s Hospital and such?

    Directly east of Parsons by Children’s would be tract 5610.
    Incomes barely budged between 2000-2014, going from $25,395 to $25,848, only a 1.8% increase. The tract just south of there, 5620, that begins at Whittier, is doing a lot better, with income growth of almost 19%.

    Here was the income breakdown.

    Less than $25K
    2000: 48.4%
    2014: 48.5%
    $25K-$49.9K
    2000: 32.7%
    2014: 27.2%
    $50K-$99.9K
    2000: 16.3%
    2014: 18.7%
    $100K and Above
    2000: 2.6%
    2014: 5.6%

    So again, some rises in the higher incomes, but stable with low incomes.

    The best performing areas of the Near South Side are the following:
    Tract 52- Extreme northern German Village just south of 70. A 69.4% increase in household income 2000-2014, from $41,693 to $70,634.
    Tract 5810- Area between Moler and Deshler, west of Parsons. A 67.9% increase, from $41,684 to $70,000.

    These incomes are similar to the Short North, but in the Short North’s case, all of it’s tracts increased at an even faster rate. Italian Village’s tract 22, where Bollinger Tower is, had an increase of 156% between 2000 and 2014, for example.

    #1116677

    UrbanPlanner2112
    Participant

    “Privatization” is a buzz word used to convince people to funnel public tax dollars into private profits. I challenge anyone to show me a “privatized” system that was truly both less expensive and more effective than the public system it replaced.

    #1116684

    Cbussmallbiz
    Participant

    “Privatization” is a buzz word used to convince people to funnel public tax dollars into private profits. I challenge anyone to show me a “privatized” system that was truly both less expensive and more effective than the public system it replaced.

    This cracks me up. So if you ever had the painful experience of doing business with CMHA you would know that it is literally impossible to be less responsive , efficient or professional. The end result being less resources used to help the people that are the sole purpose for the oranizations existence. I’m reminded of a comment made to me by a Battelle person. “People that think the government is the solution and best entity to deal with all things has clearly never done business with it”

    #1116701
    dalias
    dalias
    Participant

    <div class=”d4p-bbt-quote-title”>UrbanPlanner2112 wrote:</div>

    I’m reminded of a comment made to me by a Battelle person. “People that think the government is the solution and best entity to deal with all things has clearly never done business with it”

    Nice quote from someone whose job likely depends on massive volumes of government funded spending on research and contracts.
    http://www.battelle.org/media/press-releases/battelle-awarded-$2b-id-iq-government-contract

    That’s billion with a B. Too bad your buddy has to complete a bunch of bureaucratic paperwork to get a crack at it.

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 70 total)

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