Our City Online

Messageboard - Transportation

NOTE: You are viewing an archived version of the Columbus Underground forums/messageboard. As of 05/22/16 they have been closed to new comments and replies, but will remain accessible for archived searches and reference. For more information CLICK HERE

Should we tax parking lots to pay for transit?

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Transportation Should we tax parking lots to pay for transit?

  • This topic is empty.
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 23 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #95572

    cbuster
    Member

    Creative Ideas for Funding Transit

    Posted on January 25, 2013

    by Brent Warren, TC Blogger

    How about taxing parking lots to pay for transit? That’s an idea that is being proposed in Massachusetts, and one that anyone who has ever been to downtown Columbus might ponder as a way to fund future transit improvements here.

    READ MORE: http://www.transitcolumbus.org/creative-ideas-for-funding-transit/

    #531605
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Short answer: Yes. ;)

    #531606

    ExileOn6thSt
    Participant

    At first glance I like this idea, but wouldn’t the parking lot owners just pass the tax on to customers in the form of rate hikes?

    #531607

    bman
    Participant

    Yep

    #531608
    rus
    rus
    Participant

    ExileOn6thSt said:
    At first glance I like this idea, but wouldn’t the parking lot owners just pass the tax on to customers in the form of rate hikes?

    Of course.

    Why wouldn’t they?

    #531610
    Coremodels
    Coremodels
    Participant

    ExileOn6thSt said:
    At first glance I like this idea, but wouldn’t the parking lot owners just pass the tax on to customers in the form of rate hikes?

    I’m fine with that. Parking’s hardly pricy downtown now, adding a few dollars to monthly customers (which is where it would probably go) doesn’t bother me…and may actually encourage using transit.

    #531611
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    ExileOn6thSt said:
    At first glance I like this idea, but wouldn’t the parking lot owners just pass the tax on to customers in the form of rate hikes?

    They probably could hike rates within reason. Hike them too high, and customers will resort to other measures (gasp! public transit! carpooling! parking further away and walking!). The parking lots are run by multiple private operators, so they still have to compete with each other.

    If the tax is passed on to the customers, then that seems justified to me. The people using them are what keeps them around and profitable for the owners. So there’s little incentive to develop, and we’re all left with a half-empty Downtown that no one fully benefits from.

    #531612
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    On a related note, the Streetcar proposal five years ago called for funding through parking meter rate increases and a 4% fee on parking and admissions to sporting and entertainment events within the “benefit zone” of the Streetcar line:

    Streetcar Financing Plan – How it all works

    Opponents of that proposed funding system said that it would unfairly punish Downtown retailers (who rely on parking meters for their customers) and a handful of entertainment venues (Arena, LC, Huntington Park, Ohio Theatre, Palace Theatre, etc) who already often have high ticket prices with other surcharges attached.

    Personally, I’d much rather see the funding for rail-based transit come from an increase reassessment of parking lot land values. Makes a lot more sense both for driving development and putting a “sin tax” on one of the biggest detriment to public transit systems.

    #531614
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Coremodels said:
    I’m fine with that. Parking’s hardly pricy downtown now, adding a few dollars to monthly customers (which is where it would probably go) doesn’t bother me…and may actually encourage using transit.

    The original article linked up top estimates that there are 73,000 surface lot spaces Downtown. An extra $5 per month per space = $4.3 million per year.

    That could make quite a dent in the annual operational costs of a Streetcar line.

    #531615

    bman
    Participant

    I say raises taxes on those lots so high that they become vacant eye sores and not open for parking and then the price of parking on other lots goes up because of higher taxes and demand … then businesses will leave downtown because of the cost to their employees and the New Albany and Dublin business parks will thrive.

    LOL

    #531616

    InnerCore
    Participant

    Here is a list showing median parking rates in various cities:

    Columbus rates are much lower than Cleveland and Cincinnati with the median monthly rate going down 12% from 2010 to 2011. We could easily add a median of $10 increase and not even be at the 2010 rates.

    #531617

    JeepGirl
    Participant

    bman said:
    I say raises taxes on those lots so high that they become vacant eye sores and not open for parking and then the price of parking on other lots goes up because of higher taxes and demand … then businesses will leave downtown because of the cost to their employees and the New Albany and Dublin business parks will thrive.

    LOL

    So if that were to happen, wonder where the millions tax revenue would come from then? The streetcar passengers maybe?

    #531618

    Lu
    Participant

    The best way to pay for streetcar/light rail that I’ve seen is to impose a modest tax on commercial properties immediately adjacent to the new line, through tax increment financing. Building a streetcar is a major gift to the adjacent property owners. They can expect to see significant increases in the value of their land and buildings, which is why developers lobby so hard to get the lines and stations built near their land. Why not have those developers help to pay for the line through a TIF? This model has been used successfully in DC and Dallas.

    The problem with taxing parking lots is it adds a financial burden to commuters who may not live or work anywhere near the new transit lines.

    #531620
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    bman said:
    I say raises taxes on those lots so high that they become vacant eye sores and not open for parking and then the price of parking on other lots goes up because of higher taxes and demand … then businesses will leave downtown because of the cost to their employees and the New Albany and Dublin business parks will thrive.

    So basically you want a region resembling Detroit.

    Good call!

    #531621

    bman
    Participant

    Walker said:
    So basically you want a region resembling Detroit.

    Good call!

    I don’t see Columbus and Detroit as similar in type of employement base, wage scale etc … so this comment is just fear mongering on your part. ; )

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 23 total)

The forum ‘Transportation’ is closed to new topics and replies.

The Columbus Coffee Festival Returns!

The 6th Annual Columbus Coffee Festival returns on Saturday September 25th and Sunday September 26th!

CLICK HERE FOR TICKETS & INFORMATION