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Ohio's Speed Limit Raised to 70 MPH

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Transportation Ohio's Speed Limit Raised to 70 MPH

Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 107 total)
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    Posts
  • #476991

    Schoolboy
    Participant

    Jman4ever said:
    You mean here?

    I would walk 500 miles

    Funny
    He often bragged about Russia’s superior snow removal from the roadways.

    Side note… he was also the scariest person I have ever had the displeasure of driving with. One foot for the brake, the other foot for the gas. At all times one of these feet were stomped to the floor.

    #476992

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    Two foot driving is actually a quite advanced driving technique. A significant portion of race car drivers do it.

    #476993

    tdziemia
    Participant

    On top of Germany, I will add Italy (yeah, really), where the drivers’ manual is more than 5 times thicker than the one we need to study in Ohio. You’re not allowed to respond with a joke about Italian drivers unless you’ve driven in Italy.

    An earlier poster summarized it rather well: in America we take it as a right (hence the regulation is minimal) rather than a privelege. It fits with the cultural norm that individual rights in the U.S. (“I have a right to drive … and to drive as fast as I like”) always take precedence over the common good (“when driven by morons, cars can kill people, so some regulation is required”).

    #476994

    News
    Participant

    Kasich Signs Bill To Boost Speed Limit, ‘Boost Economy’
    Monday April 1, 2013 7:57 AM
    By Jim Heath

    COLUMBUS, Ohio – From the highways, to the factories, Governor Josh Kasich says Ohio’s new transportation bill should help the state’s economy.

    “We’re going to have over 65,000 jobs created once this all gets done. We’re going to have better infrastructure and right now there’s no need for higher taxes on gasoline,” Kasich said.

    READ MORE: http://www.10tv.com/content/stories/2013/04/01/speed-limit-changes-proposed_.html

    #476995

    zp945
    Participant

    Governor Josh Kasich says…Oops Channel 10.

    #476996

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    Don’t let them near the Bible!

    #476997

    Analogue Kid
    Participant

    I’m glad to see 70 mph on rural interstates finally pass, but I do have concerns about 60 mph on undivided two lane roads. Your typical two lane highway has a much higher crash rate than a 4 lane expressway.

    #476998

    GCrites80s
    Participant

    Now people can hit deer and tractors more quickly.

    #476999
    Coremodels
    Coremodels
    Participant

    zp945 said:
    Governor Josh Kasich

    That dude was awesome on X Factor.

    #477000

    NEOBuckeye
    Participant

    Analogue Kid said:
    I’m glad to see 70 mph on rural interstates finally pass, but I do have concerns about 60 mph on undivided two lane roads. Your typical two lane highway has a much higher crash rate than a 4 lane expressway.

    +1
    A lot of undivided rural roads should not have higher speed limits because of the added risk factors involved. When accidents occur because a vehicle crossed the median, with a higher speed limit, they’ll just be that much more horrific.

    #477001

    News
    Participant

    Will New 70 MPH Interstate Speeds Cause More Crashes?
    April 3, 2013
    by Sam Hendren
    89.7 NPR News Reporter

    The speed limit on rural stretches of Ohio interstates will increase July 1st to 70 miles per hour. Governor John Kasich signed the bill into law earlier this week. But higher speeds have reignited debate over safety concerns.

    READ MORE: http://wosu.org/2012/news/2013/04/03/will-new-70-mph-interstate-speeds-cause-more-crashes/

    #477002

    pkovacs
    Participant

    I’m with the Ohio Bicycle Federation and we wrote to Kasich to ask him to Please line item veto the increased speed limits on state routes from 55 to 60 mph. This amendment was added at the last minute to the transportation budget bill, or we would have testified to one of the House or Senate committees.
    With all the fracking trucks in eastern Ohio, the two lane rural roads are already dangerous enough. Well, we heard nothing back and the bill was signed. Here’s some statistics I found on how increased speeds increase crashes:

    Speeding was a contributing factor in 13% of all fatal crashes in Ohio in 2011.

    Traffic fatalities declined by 16% after the National Maximum Speed Limit (NMSL) was set at 55 mph in 1974.
    It is estimated that 20,000 to 30,000 lives were saved from 1974-1978.

    When the maximum speed limit was increased to 65 mph in 1987, studies found a 15-22% increase in traffic fatalities on rural interstates, and a 12% decrease in traffic fatalities in states that retained the 55 mph speed limit.

    After full repeal of NMSL in 1995, when states were permitted to set their own maximum speed limits, traffic fatalities increased by 17% in states which increased speed limits, with a 35% increase in fatalities in 70 mph states and 38% increase in 75 mph states.

    #477003

    Patch
    Participant

    pkovacs said:
    I’m with the Ohio Bicycle Federation and we wrote to Kasich to ask him to Please line item veto the increased speed limits on state routes from 55 to 60 mph. This amendment was added at the last minute to the transportation budget bill, or we would have testified to one of the House or Senate committees.
    With all the fracking trucks in eastern Ohio, the two lane rural roads are already dangerous enough. Well, we heard nothing back and the bill was signed. Here’s some statistics I found on how increased speeds increase crashes:

    Speeding was a contributing factor in 13% of all fatal crashes in Ohio in 2011.

    Traffic fatalities declined by 16% after the National Maximum Speed Limit (NMSL) was set at 55 mph in 1974.
    It is estimated that 20,000 to 30,000 lives were saved from 1974-1978.

    When the maximum speed limit was increased to 65 mph in 1987, studies found a 15-22% increase in traffic fatalities on rural interstates, and a 12% decrease in traffic fatalities in states that retained the 55 mph speed limit.

    After full repeal of NMSL in 1995, when states were permitted to set their own maximum speed limits, traffic fatalities increased by 17% in states which increased speed limits, with a 35% increase in fatalities in 70 mph states and 38% increase in 75 mph states.

    I agree. 60 is too fast on the back roads.

    Is it too late for him to make the change?

    #477004

    pkovacs
    Participant

    Yes, it’s too late. The bill was already signed into law and goes into effect July 1. ODOT now has control over where they want to increase limits to 60 on state routes.

    #477005

    rodrudinger
    Member

    Count on the Legislature to do the wrong thing. 70 is probably all right on the interstates, which are wide with easy turns and grades, but I’m against increasing the speed limit on other state highways to 60. There’s also the problem of those individuals (some of whom posted here) who routinely do 5 to 15 miles an hour over the speed limit, and distracted driving, such as using cell phones or texting while driving. Texting apparently led to a crash on I-70 west of Columbus which killed two people, wrecked several cars and trucks, and tied up traffic in the area for several hours. When you drive, DRIVE! You should have your full attention devoted to driving and being aware of your surroundings. There is also the possibility of mechanical failure. What are you going to do if you blow a tire, lose steering, or lose a CV joint at 70 mph?

Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 107 total)

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