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Short North Design Guidelines

Home Forums General Columbus Discussion Development Short North Design Guidelines

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  • #88173

    News
    Participant

    Short North soon to have design guidelines for area developers

    By Mark Ferenchik

    The Columbus Dispatch

    Tuesday September 13, 2011 5:34 AM

    You might be surprised to know that the Short North, with its art galleries, specialty shops and trendy restaurants, doesn’t have a set of standards to guide High Street’s distinctive look.

    That will change with the new Short North Design Guidelines, which the Columbus City Council will discuss on Monday.

    The guidelines recommend that buildings be no more than five stories tall and that parking lots be located behind buildings.

    READ MORE: http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2011/09/13/image-to-uphold.html

    #460610
    Anne Evans
    Anne Evans
    Keymaster

    I love the Jackson Building. I’m glad that got built. Is the Pizzuti hotel still happening?

    I think a mixture of sizes through there is nice.

    #460611

    Mod-dude
    Participant

    I have mixed feelings about this. I don’t know if I want uniformity in the Short North… I guess some are good, but it feels like it could become less organic (maybe it already really has) and more suburban-guided in nature. On the other hand, we all see things on occasion and say to ourselves, “there ought to be some guidelines here.” I think the era of the true artist’s haven is over for the Short North as things are becoming too rigid, rents have become too high and now guidelines to tell artists how they can create the art that spells their name. Where is the next artist’s haven? South Parsons? East Franklinton? King Lincoln/Old Town? Linden? E. Livingston?

    #460612
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Really disappointed to hear that the building height limit caps out at five stories.

    I thought the Short North was an “Arts District” and not a “Historic Preservation” district? An arts district shouldn’t necessarily have a unified design standard. It should be a little more creative, unique and modern.

    I hope that exceptions to these rules can be made for specific projects in the future.

    #460613
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    Mod-dude said:
    Where is the next artist’s haven? East Franklinton?

    Yes.

    Public Input Sought for East Franklinton Creative Community District Plan

    #460614

    rory
    Participant

    Walker said:
    Really disappointed to hear that the building height limit caps out at five stories.

    I thought the Short North was an “Arts District” and not a “Historic Preservation” district? An arts district shouldn’t necessarily have a unified design standard. It should be a little more creative, unique and modern.

    I hope that exceptions to these rules can be made for specific projects in the future.

    While most of it is just common sense type things from Preservation Briefs other parts really strike me as short-sighted and bad for art and historic preservation. The reliance on brick for new buildings just guarantees it’s going to look like Worthington. New brick and mortar doesn’t look like old brick and just lends to a faux historicity. Nothing makes a building look more historic than being next to one with contemporary design and materials. I understand the rhythm of the street in mass and scale but to cap everything at 5 stories seems short-sighted too. Maybe exceptions will be made for nicely designed specific projects but it seems like mediocrity is the preferred avenue (again).

    Is the Pizzuti project affected by this or are they through the process? A lot of the guidelines concerning material and such seemed to be a tailor-made stick in the eye for that project.

    #460615

    surber17
    Participant

    This is absolutely ridiculous! I love the idea of having guidelines to streamline the design process (ex. you could save a lot of time in getting buildings approved) but why 5 stories? Why limit the growth like that? Also, if I was a developer I’d grab that piece of land available on 5th and High right away since it will be one of the only places you can build above 5 stories.

    #460616

    JonMyers
    Participant

    Walker said:
    Really disappointed to hear that the building height limit caps out at five stories.

    +1

    #460617

    anillo
    Participant

    So will developers along High in the SN have to pass these guidelines in addition to the architectural review board, or will this replace those? It seems a bit pointless to me, the guideliens mentioned in the article are either unnecessarily limiting (building height, materials) or just plain unnecessary (parking lots in rear, no one-story developments, can’t really see any developments like that getting approved anyways).

    #460618

    Likes Old Houses
    Participant

    Who does this benefit? It just devalued non-historic parcels that could be redeveloped, because you no longer can build a larger, high dollar developments. Imagine the strip mall property at Price and High redeveloped at 10-12 stories and enclosed parking. Instead you will get 5 stories with a parking lot in the back, becasue the development won’t support building a garage.

    #460619

    Pablo
    Participant

    I read through the guidelines and I don’t think it’s necessarily a bad thing. Although brick and stone are encouraged it doesn’t outlaw titanium or glass. Stucco and stucco-like material “should be avoided” which is probably a good thing.

    Also, from the guidelines: New construction should be no less than two stories above grade. Currently, buildings from three to five stories are found in multiple locations and new construction in that height range will be considered in the context of its location. Buildings of six or more stories, thought not original to the district will be considered on a case-by-case basis

    It seems to me that, if it’s a “good” project, the developer can go taller than 4 stories. It depends on who sits on the design review board….

    #460620

    lifeliberty
    Participant

    Censorshp in the “arts” district, fabulous!

    #460621

    HeySquare
    Participant

    anillo said:
    So will developers along High in the SN have to pass these guidelines in addition to the architectural review board, or will this replace those? It seems a bit pointless to me, the guideliens mentioned in the article are either unnecessarily limiting (building height, materials) or just plain unnecessary (parking lots in rear, no one-story developments, can’t really see any developments like that getting approved anyways).

    Yeah, those UDF, Check Cashing, and Family Dollar type developments would never get approval. Those guidelines are completely unnecessary. ;)

    Guidelines are a necessary legal tool for the Commissions. Without them, it is very difficult to make legally defensible decisions. They need to provide a defensible framework of expectations that property owners can easily understand. While they may seem prescriptive, it is necessary– maybe there is a better alternative to brick, but trust me when I say there are plenty of worse alternatives too. And proposals for the worse alternatives are more typical.

    While I don’t know the specifics, I believe that each of the architectural review boards will use these Guidelines to guide their review of High Street projects, so that developers can have some expectation that a project will get a similar review whether it is located in Victorian Village or Italian Village. People think that the Commissions are unamious in their opinions, but they are comprised of smart professional people who volunteer their time, and there is frequently a diversity of opinion on how projects should be treated.

    Personally I think that guidelines provide a creative framework that pushes architects and designers to think creatively.

    #460622

    Jefe
    Participant

    are they hard limitations, or just guidelines/desires? either way, hopefully the SN will probably survive height limits as long as downtown (and maybe Weinland Park?) encourage higher density. we’re compact enough that it might work. otherwise, prices will go sky high and SN will be pure bourgie retirees and financial types instead of any artsie folks.

    side effects of the well-meaning Jane Jacobs crowd.

    #460623
    Walker Evans
    Walker Evans
    Keymaster

    surber17 said:
    Also, if I was a developer I’d grab that piece of land available on 5th and High right away since it will be one of the only places you can build above 5 stories.

    The asking price for that lot increased today to $1 Trillion. ;)

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 28 total)

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